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All across this country in small towns, rural areas and cities, alcoholism and drug abuse are destroying the lives of men, women and their families. Where to turn for help? What to do when friends, dignity and perhaps employment are lost?

The answer is Palm Partners Recovery Center. It’s a proven path to getting sober and staying sober.

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Is My Teenager Addicted to Drugs?

Is My Teenager Addicted to Drugs?

(This content is being used for illustrative purposes only; any person depicted in the content is a model)

Author: Justin Mckibben

Part of being a parent is wondering what trouble your kids might get into. This is especially true as children become more independent as teens and young adults. Parents worry about how their kids are doing in school, if they are surrounding themselves with good influences and of course, if they’re doing drugs. It seems like there has never been a more appropriate time to be concerned about teenage substance abuse. Parents today are witness to the devastation and despair caused by the opioid epidemic. While teen drug use has always been an issue, it is more frightening than previous years with overdose deaths at such an alarming rate. What are the signs? How serious is teen drug abuse? Is your adolescent addicted to drugs?

Is My Teenager Addicted to Drugs: Teen Drug Abuse Stats

It is not that shocking that teen drug abuse is such a concern for parents. Substance use disorder currently affects more than 20 million people in the United States.

In 2015, more than 33,000 people in the United States died from accidental overdose. According to the 2015 Monitoring the Future College Students and Adults survey, young adults from 18-25 are the biggest abusers of:

The survey also shows young adults use prescription drugs for nonmedical reasons more than any other age group. One report showed that nearly 44% of high school students admit to knowing a classmate who sells drugs. When ask what kind of drugs, students stated:

  • 91%- Marijuana
  • 24%- Prescription drugs
  • 9%- Cocaine
  • 7%- Ecstasy

Experts from National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) state that while illicit substance abuse has shown some decline, prescription drug abuse has done more than enough to fill the void.

Is My Teenager Addicted to Drugs: Those at Risk

If there is one thing we have learned without question from the opioid epidemic, it is that the old archaic mentality that substance use disorders were only experienced by people living troubled lives is anything but true.

Anyone and everyone are at risk. No race, nationality, social or economic background can exempt someone from the potential for addiction, even teenagers. It doesn’t matter if you grow up in a small town, a suburb or a bad part of town. It doesn’t matter if you are homeless or if you inherit a fortune, you still are eligible for addiction.

In a way, that reality makes the prospect of your teenager getting mixed up in drugs more frightening, because the old mentality of “don’t hang out with the wrong crowd” doesn’t really apply anymore. Any crowd and every crowd can get mixed up in this.

Truthfully, teens are exposed to substances in so many ways, but there are also a lot of ways to spot use and try to address it as early as possible.

Is My Teenager Addicted to Drugs: Warning Signs

Knowing the warning signs of addiction can save lives, and ensuring it is addressed through every possible channel is key—even at a yearly doctor’s appointment. Many doctors are being trained to identify the signs of early drug abuse and ask questions about substance use disorders. When you are still wondering- is my teenager addicted to drugs- then you can try to look at signs such as:

  • Mood swings
  • Changes in grades
  • Lack of interest in activities
  • Trouble at school or work
  • Changes in friends
  • Suffering withdrawal symptoms, including shaking, seizures, personality changes
  • Hiding drug use
  • Using substances in private

According to mental health experts, some of these symptoms can also be signs of a mental health disorder. The best course of action when a parent begins to detect some of these signs would be to have a conversation with their teenager. Having a dialog can create opportunities for education, prevention and intervention.

Is My Teenager Addicted to Drugs: Helping VS Hurting

If your teenager is struggling with a substance use disorder there are a number of things you can do to help. There are also some things that parents institutionally do that can ultimately be harmful. Family members are always used to playing different roles, and often times parents want to be as supportive as possible. The important distinction family members all need to learn is the difference between helping and hurting.

As parents people typically lean toward one side or the other. They either want to be protective and enabling, or they chose to use ‘tough love’ to try and force their family members to get clean.

To learn more about how to handle the difficult emotions and situations parents and family members face with an addicted loved one, download our FREE e-book

“What is the Difference Between Helping and Hurting”

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It is important to be compassionate and supportive. It is also important to set boundaries with your addicted teenager. Understanding the self-destructive behaviors of individuals who struggle with addiction will help you to avoid enabling those risk patterns. This knowledge also helps parents and families members to be more constructive and caring when it really matters.

Addiction doesn’t just affect the person who is drinking or drugging, it affects all those that are close to that person. Emotionally, physically, financially, the toll can be significant. The Family Program at Palm Partners is designed to help parents, significant others and family members of addicts. If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free now!

   CALL NOW 1-800-951-6135

In The News: Rachel Canning, the Girl Suing Parents for Tuition, Loses First Hearing

In The News: Rachel Canning, the Girl Suing Parents for Tuition, Loses First HearingA New Jersey teenager who sued her parents for financial support after leaving home has lost the first round of her lawsuit. 18-year-old Rachel Canning sought after $650 in weekly child support from her parents, a deposit for her future college tuition, the payment of the rest of her tuition at her private high school and her lawyers’ charges.

On Tuesday at a family court hearing Miss Canning was told that her parents wouldn’t have to pay child support or her legal fees. The school has put aside its fees until the case is settled. Judge Peter Bogaard cautioned that her suit could lead to a “slippery slope”, inquiring: “Are we going to open the gates for 12-year-olds to sue for an Xbox? For 13-year-olds to sue for an iPhone?” Rachel Canning claims that her parents threw her out in November of 2013 when she turned 18-years-old because they didn’t approve of her boyfriend. She said that they declined to pay for her higher education, even after she received acceptance letters from numerous universities. In court paperwork, she alleged her parents were abusive and contributed to an eating disorder and pressed her to get a basketball scholarship.

The Cannings, who also have two other daughters, said they helped her through her eating disorder and funded for a private school where she would play a lesser amount of basketball than at a state-run school. Retired Lincoln Park police chief Sean Canning and his wife, Elizabeth, said their daughter willingly left home because she did not want to follow practical household rules, such as doing chores, being courteous, keeping a curfew and terminating a relationship with a boyfriend whom they consider to be a negative influence. Rachel is requesting to be confirmed non-emancipated from her parents and as a result reliant on on her parents support.

Mr Canning told the Daily Record New Jersey newspaper before the hearing that“We love our child and miss her. It’s killing me and my wife. We have a child we want home. We’re not draconian and now we’re getting hauled into court. She’s demanding that we pay her bills but she doesn’t want to live at home and she’s saying: ‘I don’t want to live under your rules.’”

Rachel Canning has been living with the family of her best friend Jaime Inglesino and apparently wants to study biomedical engineering at the University of Vermont. This University is thought to have offered her a scholarship worth $20,000. She is still seeking a ruling to say that she is non-emancipated from her parents and that they consequently are obligated to provide her with financial care. The case will resume in court on April 22nd.

In my opinion, this girl just seems spoiled and like she thinks she is entitled. Child protective services had even done an investigation on the girl and her parents and determined that everything was fine. I think this is a young girls way to not follow her parents rules but still get them to pay for her lifestyle and everything that comes along with it. I hope the judge rules in favor of the parents and doesn’t require them to pay for this girl to live. If she is adult enough to go through with suing her parents, she should be able to get a job and take care of herself. If you or a loved one are struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll free 1-800-951-6135.

Source:

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/new-jersey-judge-rules-against-teenager-rachel-canning-suing-for-college-tuition-9170615.html

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