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All across this country in small towns, rural areas and cities, alcoholism and drug abuse are destroying the lives of men, women and their families. Where to turn for help? What to do when friends, dignity and perhaps employment are lost?

The answer is Palm Partners Recovery Center. It’s a proven path to getting sober and staying sober.

Palm Partners’ innovative and consistently successful treatment includes: a focus on holistic health, a multi-disciplinary approach, a 12-step recovery program and customized aftercare. Depend on us for help with:

Is Relapse a Part of Recovery?

Is Relapse A Part of Recovery?

Author: Justin Mckibben

Every once in a while there is that daunting cliché you may hear in the recovery community; that relapse is a part of recovery. It may come from someone who has experienced a relapse themselves, or it may come from someone trying to reassure an individual who has relapsed that they still have a place in recovery. It is never meant to be harmful or frightening. In fact it is typically a phrase used to comfort people who have tried to get clean and sober but sadly found themselves again using substances.

It is an idea used to remind those who slip and fall on the path to recovery that they are still in the fight; that they still have a chance. A lot of people do experience relapse in their journey to get off drugs or alcohol. So, is it true? Is relapse a part of recovery?

Is Relapse a Part of Recovery: What is Relapse?

When looking at the basic definition or relapse, we can break it down a little to show some depth.

  1. In general – a relapse is to suffer deterioration after a period of improvement.
  2. In medicine– relapse, also referred to as recidivism,is a return of a past condition.
  3. With the context of drug use (yes, including alcohol) – relapse is a reinstatement of drug use and drug-seeking behavior. It is the recurrence of pathological drug use after a period of

So the common thread here is that a relapse is when someone:

  1. Is able to start a period of improvement…
  2. Is healing from a previous condition…
  3. Has a period of abstinence… THEN… they use drugs or drink, which ends their period of abstinence and they fall back into drug-seeking behavior and using; activating their condition which can undo their overall improvement.

While some people might have a drink or take a pill and call it a “slip” it is essentially a relapse. Some would say having “recovery” means making improvements to behavior beyond just abstinence, so they might say the real relapse actually starts before you even use drugs; when your behavior regresses to the old destructive or compulsive patterns.

Whether you believe the relapse is the behavior or the actual physical manifestation while getting high, it may determine what your views are on the question is relapse a part of recovery.

Is Relapse a Part of Recovery: What is Recovery?

Before we have discussed that some people will define recovery differently. We will note that in general, recovery is:

  • a return to a normal state of health, mind, or strength.

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administraion (SAMHSA) there are 12 “Guiding Principles of Recovery” stating recovery:

  1. There are many pathways to recovery
  2. Is self-directed and empowering
  3. Involves a personal recognition of the need for change and transformation
  4. Recovery is holistic
  5. Has cultural dimensions
  6. Recovery exists on a continuum of improved health and wellness
  7. It’s supported by peers and allies
  8. Recovery emerges from hope and gratitude
  9. Involves a process of healing and self-redefinition
  10. Recovery involves addressing discrimination and transcending shame and stigma
  11. It involves (re)joining and (re)building a life in the community
  12. Recovery is a reality. It can, will, and does happen

All these definitions emphasize the fact that recovery is about healing, and some even concede that there are many paths to recovery and many different beliefs around how people can successfully recover. Now some people may not like it, but hear me out.

Relapse is not a part of recovery.

Is Relapse a Part of Recovery: Why Not?

Now before anyone gets upset and drops a few choice words in the comments, let me explain.

This answer isn’t so black and white. It is just one way to look at the question and try to answer in a supportive and logical way. Because when we say “is relapse a part of recovery” we are not asking about the general concept of recovery as a whole, but about the definition, and specifically the requirements for “recovery”.

To elaborate; relapse is an option. Relapse is a reality many of us face. I have been sober over 3 years myself… after I had a relapse. My opinion is not meant to exclude people who have relapsed. I do not intend to say they weren’t in recovery. I don’t intend to say they aren’t recovering now. What I am saying is that relapse is not a requirement for recovery. While it may be a part of my recovery, it is not a defining feature of recovery. Recovery can exist without relapse.

Let’s say I have a car. If the car has a sun-roof, then of course the sun-roof is a part of that car. It adds a new element to the experience that not every car has… but if the car doesn’t have the sun-roof… does that make it any less of a car? Is the car considered incomplete without it? Some cars come with accessories and features that not all cars have, while having wheels and a gas pedal is a standard. And that is what this whole conversation is about; setting standards.

A relapse is a similar concept. Plenty of people in the world of recovery from drugs and alcohol have never relapsed. Hopefully they never will. They are recovering the same as the man or woman who has relapsed countless times.

Is Relapse a Part of Recovery: Make it Count

The point of all this is to put forth the idea that maybe we shouldn’t put forth the idea that relapse is part of the recovery process. Surely it is a possibility for everyone, and surely some will consider a relapse one of the most critical moments in their recovery, but that does not mean people should minimalize or “normalize” the idea that relapses are the standard.

Setting higher standards is crucial to lasting change. We don’t want to kick anyone while they are down or fault them for their relapse(s)… however we also don’t want someone who has never tried to get clean before thinking they are going to relapse because it is “part of the plan” and everyone is doing it.

This is especially important because a lot of people have died because of relapsing after periods of abstinence. When the body goes without such potent drugs for longer periods the body is no longer as tolerant to them, and when people relapse and don’t realize their threshold has dropped they often overdose and die. If we let people assume they will have to relapse eventually in order to really get it right, they might never get the chance to get it right again.

We should stop telling people relapse is part of recovery. We should continue to tell them there is recovery after a relapse, but once you stop you never have to start again.

Have you completed treatment but went back to using drugs and alcohol? Have you relapsed more than once, maybe even been labelled a “chronic relapser?” If you or someone you love is struggling, please call toll-free now.

   CALL NOW 1-800-951-6135

Is There a Cure for Addiction?

Is there a Cure for Addiction?

(This content is being used for illustrative purposes only; any person depicted in the content is a model)

Author: Justin Mckibben

Is there a cure for addiction? Anyone who has felt the pain of addiction, or witnessed the suffering of a family member or someone they love, there is of course that hope deep down that there is an answer; a solution that will save their life and remove their difficulties.

In this age of innovation and technology we have an incredible amount of information at our disposal, constantly. Scientific and medical advancements have never happened so fast, and we have created a whole new way to share information. There is almost no task or technique that we cannot learn through blogs and online videos. And in the world of instant everything it only makes sense that we want a quick and effective solution.

So even when it comes to the more difficult obstacles we are struggling to overcome, we often hope to find an easy answer. Sadly, science and technology have not yet found a cure for addiction, by the strictest definition.

What is a cure?

When looking for the answer to “is there a cure for addiction” we should look at a few strict definitions associated with the question.

  1. Cure

A cure is defined as the end of a medical condition. A cure has also been referred to as the substance or procedure that ends the medical condition, such as:

  • Medication
  • A surgical operation
  • Change in lifestyle
  • A philosophical mindset

Any of which that helps end a person’s sufferings.

So if we look at that definition from the beginning, is there an end to addiction? Well first, take into account the difference between an end and a remission.

  1. Remission

Remission is a temporary end to the medical signs and symptoms of an incurable disease. But what is an incurable disease?

  1. Incurable disease

This is an illness where there is always a chance of the patient relapsing, no matter how long the patient has been in remission.

So is addiction an incurable disease?

  1. Addiction

Let us look at the definition of addiction as provided by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), which states:

Addiction is a primary, chronic disease of brain reward, motivation, memory and related circuitry. Dysfunction in these circuits leads to characteristic biological, psychological, social and spiritual manifestations. This is reflected in an individual pathologically pursuing reward and/or relief by substance use and other behaviors.

Addiction is characterized by inability to consistently abstain, impairment in behavioral control, craving, diminished recognition of significant problems with one’s behaviors and interpersonal relationships, and a dysfunctional emotional response. Like other chronic diseases, addiction often involves cycles of relapse and remission. Without treatment or engagement in recovery activities, addiction is progressive and can result in disability or premature death.”

Based on this analysis, addiction does qualify as an incurable disease because addiction is chronic, progressive and relapsing. However, it is important to note relapse is not a requirement. With any incurable disease relapse is a possibility, but it can also be avoided.

Don’t give up yet, because an essential part of the recovery process is relapse prevention.

Recovery is Remission for Addiction

While there may be no cure for addiction per-say, there is treatment. Various programs and support groups have been specifically designed to put an active addiction into remission. So when we talk about recovery from addiction, a program of recovery is essentially how you can effectively treat addiction.

As much as we wish there was a magic medicine that would make it disappear, science has yet to accomplish this.

The closest thing to the definition of a “cure” is that there are usually ways to implement a change in lifestyle and/or philosophical mindset that put an end to the symptoms of addiction. The fact that the definition of a “cure” acknowledges the power of lifestyle and mindset is a tremendous thing.

In a comprehensive treatment program for addiction the hope is to not only separate the individual from the substance through a safe medical detox, but also to address the deeper issues. After all, drugs and alcohol are only symptoms themselves; there are much more powerful components at play, which is why there is no magic pill.

There is a Solution

Addiction is an affliction that is very personal, even though thousands upon thousands of people struggle with it every day. It may be similar somehow, but it is also intensely intimate. There is no “one size fits all” answer to it. Even programs that have a consistent outline will admit there is no monopoly on recovery. Yet, there is a solution; active recovery.

That is exactly why the holistic approach utilized by facilities like Palm Partners is designed so each individual can create a personalized recovery plan to help them find what path they will take toward an effective solution. Part of that is powerful and supportive relapse prevention.

We want you to be actively engaged in your recovery, or that of your loved one, so that you can have the change in lifestyle and/or mindset that will change everything. Through holistic healing, cognitive behavioral therapy and various forms of personal development we hope to help you find your solution.

There may not be an instant cure, but there is treatment. Choosing an educational, caring and inspiring treatment program can help establish the foundation needed to build lasting recovery. If you or someone you love is struggling, please call toll-free now.

   CALL NOW 1-800-951-6135

How to Detox from Drugs at Home

How to Detox from Drugs at Home

(This content is being used for illustrative purposes only; any person depicted in the content is a model)

Author: Justin Mckibben

When it comes to overcoming a serious drug addiction it is crucial to start your recovery strong and with a healthy and stable foundation. Long lasting and sustainable sobriety often means consistent work on not just healing physically, but also psychologically. After-all, drugs and alcohol are not the only symptom to addiction; it is often far deeper than the surface.

So when it comes to the question many people may ask- how to detox from drugs at home- the best answer we can think of is pretty straight forward… just don’t.

You may wonder why, especially if you think it is all just a matter of white-knuckled will-power to get through the initial shock to the system that comes without the substance. Maybe you are a parent or family member who just wants to help your loved one any way you can.

However, the truth is that trying to detox at home isn’t just an unnecessary risk, it can also be incredibly dangerous or even life threatening.

How to Detox from Drugs at Home: Withdrawals

Due to the withdrawals, which can go from modern to overwhelming, many people want to find a way to detox comfortably. Therefore, many people trying to figure out how to detox from drugs at home do so because they want to avoid the physical discomfort while still working towards getting clean.

Then depending on pre-existing conditions or adverse health effects of drug abuse, there can be other medical complications during the detox process that most cannot diagnose or treat at home.

There are also drugs that are so potent and damaging that if someone tries to detox at home “cold turkey” they may do far greater harm to the body and vital organs. Some drug withdrawals can actually kill. If you are to ask how to detox from drugs at home with a primary concern about withdrawals, it is probably not a good idea in the first place.

How to Detox from Drugs at Home: Maintenance Drugs

The physical dependence on the substance that develops from extended use and increased tolerance can be a nightmare. The detox process can be incredibly difficult for most people. Some people have used medication maintenance programs like methadone or Suboxone to try and get off illicit drugs, but often times these methods are also unsustainable in the long-term. Usually, these medications also have side-effects of their own.

Suboxone, for example, is often used as a maintenance drug for opioid addiction. The problem is, there is a lot about Suboxone that most people don’t know.

If you want to read more download our free E-book “5 Things No One Tells You about Suboxone”

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With methadone people find themselves visiting a clinic to receive doses of a maintenance drug that has become infamous for its own horrible withdrawal symptoms.

In the end, recovery experts consistently insist that these drugs are only really useful when accompanied by cognitive behavioral therapy or comprehensive addiction treatment.

How to Detox from Drugs at Home: Relapse Prevention

Another crucial part of drug detox that a lot of people forget about is the importance of relapse prevention. While most people think of detox as just the first stages of trying to get clean, the reality is that there is still an incredibly high chance for someone trying to detox at home of relapsing. Not just because they aren’t removed from the environment in a secure facility, but also because they are struggling with withdrawal while also not getting the strong support and treatment.

Truthfully, most addiction treatment professionals and experts agree that detox should always be done with the supervision and support of medical professionals. Behavioral therapy and other forms of treatment are also critical components of shaping the foundation for recovery from drugs and alcohol. Beyond medication or even natural remedies to combat withdrawal, people also need to develop coping skills to prevent relapse.

Instead, Choose Safe Medical Detox

It is true there are cases of some detox attempts done from home, but at the end of the day it is still an unnecessary level of discomfort and risk. Because people do also die from trying to detox from dangerous drugs at home. There is no need to kick and scream on the couch when there are so many resources that provide safe medical detox.

Ultimately, the specific substance, the length of use and the severity/frequency of use will determine how difficult the detox process will be. A combination of volatile substances can also create a whole new danger.

So instead of giving you a list of supplies, which will be incomplete or insufficient, or giving you a few cliff notes on how to detox from drugs at home, we thought it was important to stress why event though it may be ‘possible’ it can also be harmful, and in the end can even be counterproductive.

The Palm Partners detox facility has a 24-hour medical and addiction professional staff to continuously evaluate individual progress, administer the appropriate levels of medications and provide unlimited support during this process. Our highly qualified specialists genuinely strive to make recovery possible for everyone who needs help. If your or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free.

   CALL NOW 1-800-951-6135

8 Things to Do When You’re in Relapse Mode

8 Things to Do When You’re in Relapse Mode

(This content is being used for illustrative purposes only; any person depicted in the content is a model)

By Cheryl Steinberg

When we talk about relapse, we often use the terms “prelapse” or “mental relapse.” In actuality, the concept of relapse, when it comes to addiction, is something that includes the mental aspect – mood, mindset, and later, behaviors, that reflect a downward spiral. Therefore, “relapse” means all the mental stuff that leads up to picking up a drink or drug after some sobriety.

Here are 8 things to do when you’re in relapse mode.

#1. Be self-aware

Maybe you practice prayer and meditation. Maybe it’s CBT or some other therapy. Whatever it is, you will need something to support you in being self-aware. When we were in active addiction, we were used to just going through the motions and merely trying to survive. Oh, and denial ran deep. Recovering from addiction means having the insight and willingness to look at ourselves.

#2. Be honest

With yourself and others.

#2. Decide where you’re at

There are 11 phases of relapse, with the last phase being the actual use of alcohol or other drug. Get acquainted with this scale and practice identifying how you feel on a daily basis. This will take a heck of a lot of #1 and #2 to accomplish.

#3. Step up your game

Whether it’s a 12 step program or some other program of recovery, it’s time to take action. Get to a meeting. Call someone to get you there. Call your sponsor (again, if 12 steps is your thing).

#4. Get other support

If you see a therapist or other counselor, make an appointment to be seen as soon as possible. If you don’t have other support to bolster your program, such as a therapist, maybe it’s time to consider scheduling an appointment with one. You might be surprised at how much better you feel once you take action – even before you actually get to talk to someone.

#5. Set (and re-set) safe boundaries

You have already heard that you need to change people, places, and things. Perhaps you’ve become complacent in your recovery. Maybe you have some time under your belt and you don’t seem to have a problem hanging out with normies – even as they drink, smoke pot, or use other substances. But, if you’re in relapse mode, it’s urgent to change this. Quick, fast, and in a hurry.

#6. Don’t isolate

As much as you might want to, don’t isolate yourself from others. In fact, you should do the exact opposite. Reach out to the friends and family members you trust the most. Tell on yourself. And let yourself feel the love and support they have to offer.

#7. Help someone else

The 12 Steps is all about service to others but, hear me out, if you’re not a 12-stepper, there are tons of other schools of thought that encourage helping others, especially when you’re going through it. Science supports that being in service to others works tremendously to shift your mood from negative to positive.

#8. Stop feeling sorry for yourself

Be gentle with yourself and show yourself the same compassion that you would want others to show you – often times, we are wayyyy harder on ourselves than we are on others. With that said, don’t sit and wallow in self-pity. Decide that you are worthy of sobriety and that you are willing to do whatever it takes to maintain it.

If you are struggling with substance abuse or addiction, or you have a loved one who struggles, help is available in the form of addiction treatment. Programs that treat this medical condition will teach you all about relapse prevention while handing you the tools – healthy coping methods – to use in order to lead a healthy, happy, substance-free life. Call toll-free 1-800-951-6135 today.

Norfolk, MA Drug Rehab

Norfolk, MA Drug Rehab

Norfolk, MA Drug Rehab: Options

Norfolk, MA Drug Rehab facilities have a few great locations and each has a different approach to the process of recovery. Make sure you do your research to find what addresses what is most important to you, and make the choice of a Norfolk, MA Drug Rehab based on your personal needs. You should always keep in mind that in Norfolk, MA Drug Rehab the programs offer a variety of treatment options to choose from, including programs pertaining to:

Norfolk, MA Drug Rehab: Therapy Types

After you’ve completed an initial detox phase, the next step is to go into treatment and start therapy and learning how to stay sober. In Norfolk, MA Drug Rehab they will ask you a series of questions first to better get to know you and understand your history. Once they have asked you these questions, they will choose a therapist that is best suited for you and you will get started on your treatment plan. There are individual therapy sessions as well as group therapy sessions. Most treatment centers take you to 12-step meetings daily and get you acquainted with the recovery community around you. In treatment, you learn coping skills and how to live your life without drugs and alcohol. Anyone can become confused or over-whelmed by asking recovering alcoholics or drug addicts about Norfolk, MA Drug Rehab or how they personally overcame their substance abuse. They may describe such different and appeal approaches. Some popular suggestions are listed as:

  • Hospitalization
  • Diet
  • Exercise
  • Counseling
  • Sauna’s
  • Religion
  • Hypnosis
  • Self-help groups

Essential to successful treatment one thing is certain: practically any approach will work for some of the people, some of the time. Simply put, successful recovery has got to be tailor-made for each individual. A great deal of variation exists in the degree of dependence among drug users, and the programs Norfolk, MA Drug Rehab can provide.

Norfolk, MA Drug Rehab: Parts of Treatment

Knowing the extent of your recovery program is vital to achieving permanent sobriety. Any Norfolk, MA Drug Rehab should offer the following services:

  • Safe environment where participants are screened for drugs and alcohol
  • Counseling where individual emotional issues can be addressed
  • Emphasis on healthy living
  • Should be licensed and accredited by appropriate governing authorities
  • Fully licenses and certified staff
  • Continuing recover plans including peer review and counseling
  • Relapse prevention plan
  • Stress management counseling

Norfolk, MA Drug Rehab: Continued Sobriety

Once the treatment center has determined that you are ready to leave in-patient rehab, you will start with the IOP program. IOP (intensive outpatient program) is where you continue therapy and group sessions, you just don’t live in the rehab anymore and have a lot more freedom. Most individuals go into a halfway house once they have finished in-patient treatment. A halfway house offers more stability than being on your own, but still gives you a lot of freedom. You will be required to have a job, go to meetings, pay rent, clean and do chores, be drug tested, get a sponsor and work a program. You know you are in a good sober living environment when they want you going to meetings and working a program of recovery.

To successfully stay sober, I had to go to meetings and be involved in my recovery. It’s important to connect with others around you who are in recovery and have a strong support system. It can be difficult in early sobriety to deal with life on life’s term, having supports makes it a lot easier. At Norfolk, MA drug rehab there are programs set to help laying out the stepping stones to get you started living a peaceful and happy life! If you or a loved one is struggling with substance abuse or addiction and is looking for Norfolk, MA Drug Rehab please call 1-800-951-6135.

 

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