Safe, effective drug/alcohol treatment

All across this country in small towns, rural areas and cities, alcoholism and drug abuse are destroying the lives of men, women and their families. Where to turn for help? What to do when friends, dignity and perhaps employment are lost?

The answer is Palm Partners Recovery Center. It’s a proven path to getting sober and staying sober.

Palm Partners’ innovative and consistently successful treatment includes: a focus on holistic health, a multi-disciplinary approach, a 12-step recovery program and customized aftercare. Depend on us for help with:

Celebrity Rehab Host Dr. Drew Blames Opioid Epidemic on Doctors

Celebrity Rehab Host Dr. Drew Blames Opioid Epidemic on Doctors

Celebrity Rehab Host Dr. Drew Blames Opioid Epidemic on Doctors

Dr. Drew Pinsky, a board-certified addictions specialist, famous as the host of Celebrity Rehab With Dr. Drew, recently responded to a New York Times analysis. The analysis revealed that drug-related deaths have spiked to 19% across the country in 2016.  According to the report, drug overdoses are now the leading cause of death for Americans under 50.

In response, Dr. Drew says this epidemic was brought on by the doctors. He blames doctors who continued prescribing opioids to patients despite their awareness of the high risk of addiction.

“The reason we have all these heroin addicts is because physicians over-prescribed opiates and then cut these patients off as opposed to getting them treatment,” he said recently on KABC radio. “And when you cut an opiate addict off, the state they’re in requires they find an alternative source of opiates. The cheapest best route now—fentanyl.”

Although his words are quite direct, they hold true.

Last week, an article published in The New England Journal of Medicine argued that the medical community wrongly cited a small 1980s editorial to repeatedly claim that opioids did not have highly addictive qualities.

“The crisis arose in part because physicians were told that the risk of addiction was low when opioids were prescribed for chronic pain. A one-paragraph letter that was published in the Journal in 1980 was widely invoked in support of this claim, even though no evidence was provided by the correspondents,” the editorial reads.

Essentially, doctors were using a letter rather than a clinical evidence to validate the claim that opioids were not addictive. This led many patients into believing that the medications they were using would not cause any form of dependence.

Addiction Stigma Further Wreaks Havoc

Furthermore, Dr. Drew states stigma surrounding addiction prevents doctors from addressing any concerns they may feel regarding their patients.

“They are afraid of the term addiction. They feel as though diagnosing someone with addiction is somehow judging them,” he continued.

Doctors who regularly prescribe opioids are at the root of the problem, Dr. Drew states, because the chances of dependence are high, and patients are often unaware of how real the risk really is.

“70 to 80% of people develop disabling consequences from their relationship with opiates,” Dr. Drew said,

The problem is when doctors continue to prescribe opioids despite the high risk of addiction, or worse, cut off a patient’s supply to opioids without providing some sort of addiction treatment option.

Patient Satisfaction is King

There is also a mindset in medicine that must abide by the patient when it comes to pain management.

“The discipline holds that ‘pain is what the patient says it is. Who are we to say when we have pain control? Pain control is achieved when the patient says it’s achieved.’ And that group will only admit to the fact that perhaps 30% of the patients get a little bit of a problem,” he said.

Stigma around addiction keeps physicians from talking to their patients about the risks of dependence. This leads to long-term dependence. While there have been regulations in place to prevent abuse, this often backfires.

Many people who were once dependent on opioid prescriptions turn to heroin due to the increased availability and decreased price cost. Heroin varies significantly in strength and many strands contain powerful substances like fentanyl which lead to overdose fatalities.

The opioid epidemic is a complex problem with a myriad of potential solutions. However, it is uncertain what solution will boast the best results.  If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free now.

CALL NOW 1-800-951-6135

Turmeric: Why Everyone Is Suddenly Obsessed With It

Turmeric: Why Everyone Is Suddenly Obsessed With It

Why is Everyone Talking about Turmeric?

No really, I want to know.

Recently, we published an article about the connection between chronic pain and addiction. The article garnered a variety of comments, and many people suggested that those with chronic pain use turmeric to treat their symptoms. Truthfully, this is far from the first time I have heard turmeric suggested for medical purposes.

Where is all the hoopla about turmeric coming from? Is turmeric the new kale?

Not exactly. In fact, turmeric has been used for centuries for its medicinal properties.  In India, turmeric was used for thousands of years as a spice and medicinal herb.

It was not until recently that scientists caught on to what Indians have known for a long time:  turmeric contains strong medicinal properties. It helps with virtually all types of medical problems.

What is Turmeric?

Turmeric is the spice that gives curry its yellow color.  The compounds in turmeric are called curcuminoids; the most important is called Curcumin. Curcumin is the active ingredient in turmeric. Curcumin is known for its anti-inflammatory effects and is a very strong antioxidant.

Surprisingly, the Curcumin content in turmeric is not that high. It’s estimated to be around 3% by weight. Therefore, if you want the full medicinal benefits of turmeric, it is recommended to take turmeric extracts that contain mostly Curcumin itself. Otherwise, it would be challenging to reach these levels on your own simply by using turmeric spice.

Curcumin is not absorbed into the bloodstream, so it is recommended to consume black pepper with it. Black pepper contains piperine, a natural substance that enhances the absorption of Curcumin by 2000%.

To sum it up: Turmeric contains Curcumin, a substance that has potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Recently, the spice gained a huge following from those who benefit from its medicinal properties. As we enter an era where more people are opposed to prescription medications, natural alternatives are making a major comeback.

Turmeric Medicinal Benefits

There have been thousands of peer-reviewed articles proving the benefits of turmeric and the healing compounds Curcumin.  In fact, turmeric is the most frequently mentioned medicinal herb in all of science! Other popularly studied herbals include garlic, cinnamon, ginseng, ginger and milk thistle.

Compared to conventional medicine, the benefits of turmeric equal to that of many pharmaceutical drugs. In fact, some studies report that using Curcumin is more advantageous than certain prescription drugs.

Health Benefits of Turmeric:

Turmeric offers similar benefits to painkillers, anti-depressants, anti-inflammatory drugs, cholesterol drugs, and so much more.

Some specific benefits are:

  1. Preventing Blood Clotting

    Turmeric is shown to offer the same benefits as medications intended to slow and prevent blood clots such as aspirin, Clopidogrel (Plavix) and warfarin. Unlike some of these drugs which pose serious health risks like excessive bleeding and hemorrhage, turmeric has no known side effects unless taken in very heavy doses. Since the mid-1980s, the Curcumin in turmeric has been suggested by researchers as a better alternative to those with vascular thrombosis.

  2. Anti-depressants

    While there are not many studies conducted on humans, dozens of trials have proven that turmeric is especially effective in correcting depression symptoms in laboratory animals. Curcumin was found to be as effective as antidepressants in managing depression. More studies are needed to understand the mood enhancing properties of Curcumin fully.

  1. Anti-inflammatories

    Arguably the most powerful and popular use of Curcumin is its ability to control inflammation. The journal Oncogene revealed several anti-inflammatory compounds. The study found Curcumin to be among the most effective anti-inflammatory compounds in the world, even compared to aspirin and ibuprofen. Diseases today like cancer, ulcerative colitis, arthritis, high cholesterol and chronic pain are partly related to inflammation.

  2. Arthritis Management

    As mentioned below, Curcumin helps with inflammation. A study conducted compared the benefit of Curcumin in turmeric to arthritis drugs that had side effects like leaky gut and heart disease. The study found the highest improvement in patients who took Curcumin compared to the rheumatoid arthritis medication. Since there are fewer side effects in the use of Curcumin, this could be a better option for patients struggling to manage their arthritis.

  3. Pain Relief

    One of the most widely accepted properties of Curcumin is the pain management properties. Research released discovered that Curcumin naturally activates the opioid system in diabetics rap. Typically manipulated by painkillers, this natural process serves as the body’s inherent pain-relieving response. However, Curcumin does not have the risk of opioid dependency like painkillers such as oxycodone do, therefore the risk fo dependency diminishes.

Could Turmeric Help Combat Opioid Epidemic?

The benefits of turmeric go so much further than this article. Of course, is always crucial to talk about different treatment options with your doctor. Do not attempt to change your regimen without professional guidance.

Still, turmeric could help with pain management, which may improve the risk of opioid dependency overall. What are your thoughts? Could turmeric really make a difference? Have you used it?

Nevertheless, if you are struggling with addiction or mental illness, please reach out. We want to help you. Do not wait. Call now. 

   CALL NOW 1-800-951-6135

The Connection Between Chronic Pain, Mental Illness and Addiction

The Connection Between Chronic Pain, Mental Illness and Addiction

Author: Shernide Delva

Chronic pain can be extremely difficult to manage. Pain management involves a variety of treatment options, but one area that desperately needs attention is the psychological impact of chronic pain. According to researchers, about half of adults with chronic pain also experience anxiety or mood disorders like depression.

The findings, published online in the Journal of Affective Disorders, highlight the need to offer treatment and resources to those struggling with the psychological impact of chronic pain.

“The dual burden of chronic physical conditions and mood and anxiety disorders is a significant and growing problem,” said Silvia Martins, MD, Ph.D., associate professor of Epidemiology at the Mailman School of Public Health, and senior author.

The research examined data to analyze the associations between mood and anxiety disorder and self-reported chronic physical conditions. 5,037 participants in São Paulo, Brazil participated in the interview process.

Among individuals with mood disorders, chronic pain was reported by 50 percent, followed by respiratory disease at 33 percent, cardiovascular disease at 10 percent, arthritis by 9 percent, and diabetes by 7 percent.

Anxiety disorders were also common among those with chronic pain reported at 45 percent, and respiratory at 30 percent, as well as arthritis and cardiovascular disease, each 11 percent.

“These results shed new light on the public health impact of the dual burden of physical and mental illness,” said Dr. Martins. “Chronic disease coupled with a psychiatric disorder is a pressing issue that health providers should consider when designing preventive interventions and treatment services — especially the heavy mental health burden experienced by those with two or more chronic diseases.”

Chronic Pain and Painkiller Addiction

One common treatment for chronic pain is the use of prescription painkillers. Opioids like Vicodin, OxyContin, and Percocet affect specific parts of the brain that reduce the perception of pain. However, along with reducing the perception of pain, these medications also release feel-good chemicals in the brain, often leading to dependence.

With this study, it is clear why chronic pain sufferers are susceptible to opioid dependence due to a variety of factors including the need for feel-good chemicals like dopamine. Chemicals like dopamine and serotonin are lacking in those with depression and anxiety.

Many patients who take prescription painkillers do so without forming any dependence.  In some, opioid use generates negative side effects such as nausea, making them more unwilling to use the drug’s long-term. Still, some individuals are so desperate for pain relief, that they take larger doses than prescribed more frequently. Not long after, a full-blown addiction develops.

It is important to note that there is no way to know whether a prescription painkiller user will develop an addiction to opioids. However, factors like having a family history of addiction, struggling with mood disorders such as depression or anxiety, or experiencing a past trauma, such as physical or sexual abuse all increase the risk. Those who have struggled with previous addiction are at a higher risk as well.

Another dangerous aspect of opioid addiction is that it often leads to heroin use. Health officials confirm that this is not uncommon. Because painkillers are more difficult to obtain and more expensive, many users turn to using heroin. Heroin is in a similar drug classification as opioids and is easy to obtain for cheap on the street.

Overall, this study says a lot about the way mental disorders and addiction often go hand in hand. That’s why so many treatment centers offer a dual diagnosis program. Therefore, if you struggle with mental illness, addiction or both, please call now. We want to help.

   CALL NOW 1-800-951-6135

Is it Dangerous to Quit Using Opioids Cold Turkey On My Own?

 

Is it Dangerous to Quit Using Opioids Cold Turkey On My Own?

Author: Shernide Delva

The opioid epidemic has reached record-breaking numbers, and with that shift comes many seeking to recover from opioid addiction. However, the withdrawal process for opioids can be a very uncomfortable process.

It is advisable to seek medical treatment to recover from opioid dependence.  This process usually involves detox and professional treatment to address the addiction. It is a bad idea to try and quit cold turkey on your own terms.

Without professional addiction treatment, people who quit opioid use on their own risk severe complications. While opioid withdrawal is not fatal necessarily, related complications can be dangerous. Even with the utmost determination and preparation, the painful side effects of withdrawal can cause even the strongest-willed person to relapse.

How Addiction and Withdrawal Works

In the brain, opioids target receptors that govern things like mood, emotion, feeling of reward and the natural pain response. When opioids hit these receptors, they cause them to over-fire, leading to short-term feelings of euphoria. Over time, the intensity of these feelings dwindles leading to the need to take more of these substances to feel good. That is why dependence begins to occur.

With regular use, your brain rewires, and eventually, the use of opioids will be the only way to feel pleasure. All other activities that gave you joy will fall by the wayside, and your main goal will be to obtain your next high.

All of this can happen relatively quickly, sometimes within a few weeks.  What makes addiction to opioids severe is the level of tolerance that quickly follows. Within a week of using the drug, you may find you need to take more achieve the same effects, and if you continue to use that amount regularly, your addiction will become much more severe. Eventually, you will need several times more a day than a doctor would ever prescribe—a recipe for a very difficult withdrawal.

Withdrawal occurs from your body trying to adjust to not having the substance anymore. When you quit cold turkey, it is like seeing the wall you are leaning on crumble. It can have very shocking effects on your system.

Opiate Withdrawal Complications

It can take weeks to recovery from substance abuse. The effects of withdrawal can be severe. Within a few days, you are likely to encounter a few of these withdrawal symptoms.

A few days later, more severe symptoms can occur like:

  • Painful abdominal cramping
  • Severe nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Chills and shivers

Opioid addiction may cause you to experience hallucinations, severe body tremors, and even suicidal thoughts. It is important to be aware of these symptoms and to have medical professionals monitoring you throughout the process. Medical professionals also have medications and holistic alternatives to help guide you through the detox process.

The biggest risk during the detox period is that you will relapse. People who quit cold turkey often start off feeling strong and determined, but severe withdrawals completely change that mindset. Many reach a point in which they would do absolutely anything to get ahold of the drug, even if it means hurting others.

Sadly, if you relapse after withdrawal, you have a higher chance of not surviving the next high. Because your tolerance decreases during detox, your body will not handle the same amount of opioids that you were used to taking. Therefore, if you relapse and take the same amount of opioid medication that you did prior, you may accidentally overdose.

While withdrawal itself may not be fatal, the instances of addicts dying due to relapsing after withdrawal are common. Furthermore, there are cases of addicts dying during the withdrawal process. Some addicts forget to keep themselves hydrated which can lead to electrolyte disturbances. The body is also prone to infections or other complications, which can have deadly consequences.

Overall, quitting cold turkey is a bad idea. It may seem like a simple solution at first, but please understand the danger you risk by doing this on your own. Remember, so many people are struggling with addiction. Instead, call us today. We have professionals waiting to get you on the right track. Recovery is possible. Call now.

   CALL NOW 1-800-951-6135

Why Should I Travel For Rehab Instead of Staying Local?

Why Should I Travel For Rehab Instead of Staying Local?

(This content is being used for illustrative purposes only; any person depicted in the content is a model)

Author: Shernide Delva

When it comes to looking for addiction treatment, there are a variety of concerns that need addressing. One important decision is whether or not to travel for recovery or stay at home. Regardless of what you decide, the primary concern should be finding the right treatment for your needs.

That said, sometimes it is necessary to travel for treatment to receive the best care. People often turn to their insurance to figure out what treatment centers are covered under their benefits. Many plans offer a variety of treatment options, and while some options are local, others are further away.

Regardless of how you pay for treatment, some options locally may not offer the level of care you need. If you are willing to travel for treatment, it expands your options tremendously to hundreds of thousands of centers across the country. Therefore, you can be more selective in what program suits your needs.

With all that said, are there any benefits for traveling to treatment?

The answer is Yes. There are quite a few benefits to traveling to a new city or state for treatment. Traveling puts you in the mindset of taking a journey toward recovery. It offers you a fresh step in a new environment.

For many, it is crucial to put some distance between their hometown and recovery. Some may find that staying home brings up way too many triggers which increase vulnerability to a relapse.

But Staying Home is Way More Convenient!

When looking for a treatment center, may consider convenience first. This is understandable. We all lead busy lives, and it might seem easier to go to a nearby treatment center instead of traveling hundreds to thousands of miles. However, you must remember that your disease requires the best care possible.

Your addiction has become unmanageable, and it is important to make time for yourself to heal. Your family, work life, and routine are already being affected by addiction and traveling for treatment give you the best chance of recovering.

Here are a few reasons why you should recover away from home:

  1. You get a fresh start:

    Pursuing treatment in another geographical area provides a “fresh start” both physically and psychologically. A new location allows you to move forward instead of being reminded of past mistakes. The goal is a long-term recovery, not short-term convenience. In a new location, you can focus on recovery and healing. Addiction is a brain disease, and recovery requires brain healing and restoration. Attending rehab in a new environment jumpstarts the process of your brain forming new neural connections and associations.

  2. Fewer Distractions:

    Seeking treatment far away from home limits the amount of distraction you have around you. You won’t run into “friends” who are also seeking treatment, and your old life will not interfere with your future. Traveling also makes it more difficult to continue using drugs or alcohol. Of course, it is still feasible; however, familiarity with an area can make it easier to do drugs. In a new location, there are fewer memories of past substance abuse. You are not near any drug dealers you already know or neighborhoods that you used to do drugs in. Finally, you can begin to build and experience healthy relationships and learn what it means to lead a sober life.

  3. You can curb impulsive behavior:

    When you are in a familiar area, it is easier to follow through on impulsive decisions. Remaining in rehab for a longer period is crucial to recovery. Several studies note how extended periods of time in treatment away from home increase the chance of recovery long term. It is easy to not give into impulses when you have a strong support system hoping the best for you.

While you may know of some programs close to home, that does not mean they are right for you. Price and convenience should not be the only consideration when choosing treatment. Your life depends on finding adequate care. Do not skimp on your recovery. Choose the best treatment center that you can afford to go to, even if it means spending more or sacrificing more.


Getting treatment for substance abuse is an investment.  It is your first step toward a new, sober life. What are your thoughts on traveling for treatment? Remember, if you are currently struggling with substance abuse, please do not wait. Seek adequate care today. Call now.

   CALL NOW 1-800-951-6135

free treatment ebook

Categories

Accepted Insurance Types Please call to inquire
Call Now