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Overprescribing Opioids: Four Doctors Prescribe 6 Million Pills in 1 Year

Overprescribing Opioids: Four Doctors Prescribe 6 Million Pills in 1 Year

Author: Justin Mckibben

Despite the fact that over 91 people die every day from an overdose due to prescription drugs, some people still struggle to realize that prescription drug abuse is the driving force behind the current opioid epidemic. According to the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM):

  • 4 out of 5 heroin users started out abusing prescription pain medication
  • 94% of people in treatment for opioid addiction surveyed in 2014 switched to heroin from prescription opioids.

One of the biggest issues is that powerful opioid painkillers are being overprescribed. Whether due to aggressive marketing tactics used by Big Pharma companies or the corrupt ‘pill mills’ where doctors were dishing out excessive prescriptions of potent drugs to be sold on the street, prescription opioids flooded the neighborhoods across the nation, helping create one of the worst addiction outbreaks in American history.

But it wasn’t just the fact that drugs were making it onto the streets. In general, even legitimate opioid prescriptions were astonishingly high. While too many people still think the only problem is heroin or street drugs, the facts show us that opioid painkillers were still largely overprescribed in recent years, which contributed to the current crisis.

Too ‘Legit’ to Quit

According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, nearly 92 million U.S. adults in 2015 were taking a legitimately prescribed opioid. That translates to 38% of the adult American population.

There were an estimated 240 million opioid prescriptions in 2015, nearly one for every adult in the general population. Even the Deputy Director of the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse, Dr. Wilson Compton, said,

“The proportion of adults who receive these medications in any year seemed startling to me”..”It’s an awful lot of people who take these, mostly for medical purposes, but within that, a significant percentage end up misusing them,”

So while a lot of these prescriptions were going to treating serious conditions, how many ended up on the street or being abused at home because they were overprescribed?

The same NSDUH survey found that 11.5 million people misused prescription opioids they obtained through illicit means. Overall, Dr. Compton states that these results indicate medical professionals are doing a poor job of appropriately prescribing these medications.

The trend didn’t end there. According to a new report, nearly 3 million people who had surgery in 2016 became persistent opioid users, taking the drugs 3-6 months after a procedure. The report also states that due to overprescribing, 3.3 billion pills were left unused by patients, which left them open for diversion or misuse.

Some pain management advocates insist that pain may end up being undertreated due to the rising scrutiny of opioid prescriptions.  Many of these advocates say it is extremely difficult to truly know if opioids are overprescribed because pain is too hard to objectively quantify. Therefore, some patients may actually need more relief resources than others.

Yet, prescribing rates are still, at the very least, questionably high. Especially considering by most estimates that over 50% of opioid pills legitimately prescribed are unused by patients, which suggests significant overprescribing certainly exists.

4 Doctors, 6 Million Pills, 1 Year

One recent case in particular that stands out concerning overprescribing of medications is the story of a small northwestern county in Arizona where 4 doctors prescribed nearly 6 million opioid pills in a 12 month period. The data provided by the Controlled Substances Prescription Monitoring Program did not list the doctors by name, but did give detailed information about the prescriptions.

Out of all 4, the top prescribing doctor is responsible for:

  • More than 20,000 opioid prescriptions
  • Equaling out to over 1.9 million pills
  • That comes to 7,350 pills a day

The second-place prescriber is responsible for:

  • More than 15,000 prescriptions
  • Equaling out to nearly 1.6 million pills

The other two doctors totally a combined 2.4 million pills prescribed.

The four doctors in question are located in Mohave County, which as of 2016 is home to approximately only 205,249 people. That comes out to about a 30 opioid supply for every single person in that county.

Now while pain may be hard to objectively quantify, these numbers are obviously unsettling. Even the executive director of the Arizona Board of Pharmacy, Kam Gandhi, could not explain why or how these four physicians were able to issue so many opioid pills.

A spokesperson for Attorney General Mark Brnovich declined to specify exactly what actions are being taken by his office concerning this development. However, according to AZ Central Doug Skvarla, who directs the Controlled Substances Prescription Monitoring Program, said that information has been passed on to Brnovich’s office for “an open investigation.”

Illicit Use of Prescriptions

There are plenty other issues with opioid prescriptions being taken advantage of all over the United States. Pain management advocates often argue that the problem isn’t about opioid prescriptions; it’s the people that misuse and divert the medications. In other words, that the people abusing opioids frequently don’t have a legitimate prescription. A lot of opioid pills being abused are obtained illicitly.

Many people won’t use their whole prescription. Many will actually give pills to a loved one who doesn’t have their own pain treatment. Or they will sell their remaining pills. Pill mills and ‘doctor shopping’ allowed for the even worse spread of excessive opioid prescriptions. Like in Illinois, where one individual received 73 prescriptions for opioid drugs from 11 different prescribers and filed them at 20 different pharmacies. In some cases, the individual filled prescriptions at multiple pharmacies in one day.

There is absolutely a high demand on the illegal drug market for prescription opioid painkillers. As a former addict who spent over 7 years using, buying and selling opioid medications on the street, I can say there is plenty of ways to get these drugs without a prescription.

However, if we back-track a little bit, how did so many potent medications get onto the streets if there is no overprescribing?

Feeling the Pain

Pain management is absolutely necessary. There must be resources and effective medications available for those suffering from serious medical conditions or recovering from life-altering procedures. There is no denying that we have to provide effective pain relief options for patients who desperately need it. So, of course, this is a difficult conversation to have, because many people can take these medications are directed and be fine when they are gone. Some people require long-term pain treatment, but it does not result in a severe addiction.

Still, the fact is that if these medications weren’t being prescribed more than medically necessary, they would have never flooded the underground drug marketplace as rapidly and as abundantly as they did. Between doctors overprescribing (sometimes for kickbacks), patients working the system and manipulating physicians, and the aggressive marketing tactics of Big Pharma going unchecked, there are plenty of elements at play.

Undoubtedly when we examine the opioid epidemic we cannot ignore any contribution. We have to make efforts to combat the spread of heroin addiction. There has to be an intensive effort to deal with the incredibly deadly synthetic opioids like fentanyl and carfentanil, and people also have to acknowledge their own choices and do their part to move forward. It might be a difficult and painful process, but it is necessary.

Still, overprescribing of opioid medications cannot be ignored. We should explore all options concerning prescription monitoring programs, enforce current regulations of drug distribution, and develop innovations in pain management therapy.

According to one report, even just a 10% reduction in surgery-related opioid prescribing would reduce:

  • The number of excess post-surgical pills available for diversion or misuse by 332 million
  • The annual number of patients who go on to persistent opioid use after surgery by 300,000
  • Annual drug costs by $830 million

Not only can we do better to treat those suffering from chronic and severe pain, but we can do better to make sure these potent and habit-forming medications don’t end up in the wrong place. For those who abuse prescription opioids, or who have found themselves using heroin, we need to provide safe and effective treatment options. Palm Partners Recovery Center has been treating people struggling with drug dependence and substance use disorder for decades, focusing on holistic and comprehensive care. If you or someone you love is struggling, please call toll-free now.

CALL NOW 1-800-951-6135

NOFX Puts Punk Rock VS Big Pharma with “Oxy Moronic”

NOFX Band Puts Punk Rock VS Big Pharma

Author: Justin Mckibben

Michael John Burkett, AKA ‘Fat Mike’, is an American musician and producer. Fat Mike is best known as the bassist and lead vocalist for the punk rock band NOFX from Los Angeles, California. Fat Mike started the band in 1983, and over the years they gained momentum until their 5th studio album Punk in Drublic gained them popularity back in 1994. In recent years Fat Mike has spoken honestly and openly about his battle with addiction. He even took to Instagram to publish the play-by-play of his detoxing from painkillers. Now Fat Mike and NOFX have made it a fight of punk rock VS Big Pharma with their newest video “Oxy Moronic.”

NOFX and First Ditch Effort

NOFX is excited to release a new album First Ditch Effort on Fat Wreck Chords on October 7th. Fat Wreck Chords is the legendary label Fat Mike started, which is part of the reason NOFX stands out; they never signed to a major label.

NOFX’s new music video for “Oxy Moronic” off the album makes a bold statement from the first line, and they consistently address the concept in their typical punk rock humor. “Oxy Moronic” is the first single and the track takes on Big Pharma in a big way. Just a sample will show it:

“I’ve been called an Oxy Moron

Because I question which drugs our war’s on

Why are there more drug stores than liquor stores you can score on

The healers have become the harmers

They’re just pharmaceutical farmers

What we used to call dealers

We now call doctors”

And from there, the song just drives the point home with a stream of clever word-play that calls out basically every major pharmaceutical company in the industry. Phrases like:

“It isn’t ADDERALL-trustic by overprescribing… how can we fight them in a SUBOXON ring?”

…or later on in the song with…

“With every DEMEROL-tercation… they’ll have a good XANAX-planation…”

The Emmy-winning comedy video website and production company Funny or Die produced the NOFX music video, and throughout it is designed to mock the well-known infomercials that the public is so used to seeing. Not only is this entertaining, but it is full of direct jabs at an issue impacting so many. Our country has been suffering for years thanks to the failed War on Drugs, while simultaneously over-consuming prescription medications.

Drug Dealing Commercials

The aspect of the NOFX video that parodies drug commercials actually is more important than most people might recognize. This is not the first time attention has been brought to how Big Pharma is allowed to advertise in our country. Meanwhile, we have learned to shrug off the idea as an everyday norm, the truth is most other countries don’t allow Big Pharma to advertise prescription drugs to individuals.

It seems like almost all other countries only let Big Pharma advertise prescription drugs to doctors. Some doctors have even been accused of prescribing more meds after receiving money from Big Pharma. In America, we have new commercials every other day trying to deal out a new miracle pill product, while listing off a pretty scary list of side-effects. Then, the ads encourage people to “ask a doctor if (blank medication) is right for you.”

Thanks in part to the over-prescribing of America, an estimated 52 million Americans abuse prescription drugs. With a country containing only 5% of the world’s population, it is truly troubling to know we as a nation consume 75% of the world’s prescriptions.

Fighting Big Pharma

Many experts do believe that public advertising of such powerful prescription drugs does indeed cause people to seek out healthcare. Even worse, some of these Big Pharma companies have already been accused of minimizing necessary warnings about substance abuse or addiction.

I need no more convincing. Literally, as I write this I’m watching YouTube and have been interrupted by 3 commercials for prescription drugs. The fact is, Big Pharma has been over-saturating us with potent medications, while not giving us all the facts on how dangerous they are, and impact should be obvious at this point. America is entrenched in an opiate epidemic, and prescription drug abuse has caused more damage than ever before.

In the words of Fat Mike, “How can we HYDRO-condone this conduct?”

The fight against addiction is about more than the fight against Big Pharma. There is real help out there; real solutions beyond relying on medication, and being medicated to overcome medications. If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free now. We want to help.

   CALL NOW 1-800-951-6135

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