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All across this country in small towns, rural areas and cities, alcoholism and drug abuse are destroying the lives of men, women and their families. Where to turn for help? What to do when friends, dignity and perhaps employment are lost?

The answer is Palm Partners Recovery Center. It’s a proven path to getting sober and staying sober.

Palm Partners’ innovative and consistently successful treatment includes: a focus on holistic health, a multi-disciplinary approach, a 12-step recovery program and customized aftercare. Depend on us for help with:

Why Supporting Jobs for Recovering Addicts is Great Economics

Why Supporting Jobs for Recovering Addicts is Great Economics

(This content is being used for illustrative purposes only; any person depicted in the content is a model)

Author: Justin Mckibben

Think about this for a minute… according to the National Institute of Drug Abuse:

  • Over 23 million American adults have reported using illicit drugs within the past year
  • More than 2/3 of individuals who report using or abusing drugs and alcohol are without work

When we talk about overcoming the drug problem in America, it means more than just reducing the amount of overdose and drug-related deaths. National recovery from the issue of widespread addiction is about more than getting drugs off the streets or cutting back on the financial strain on communities. Recovery is about rebuilding and reinventing; not only for the individual but for all those around them. Part of truly turning things around isn’t just getting addicts into recovery; it’s about getting recovering addicts back to work and back to helping build up their communities. So why is having jobs for recovering addicts good for the economy?

Recovery is Better for Business

For many, the idea of hiring someone who has admittedly struggled with drugs or alcohol is counterintuitive. Many employers still see substance use through the lenses of stigma, and so they fear the worst. Some employers may still think being addict makes someone a thief, or simply untrustworthy. Others may be worried the addict will bring unprofessional or even dangerous behavior with them to work. There are so many stereotypes attached to addiction, it is understandable why many are still hesitant. Some may even have had a bad experience themselves.

At the same time, professionals actually suffer more commonly from substance use disorder than most might expect.

Either way, many business owners will tell you that someone recovering from drug or alcohol abuse also has incredible potential to become one of the most valued members of your workforce. Many professionals believe that employing people in recovery has benefits that greatly outweigh the risks.

Some find when providing jobs for recovering addicts, these employees turn out to be some of the most grateful and hardworking. Because it is so hard to find work for some they are just happy to have an opportunity to restart their lives. Some business owners find that because many recovering addicts follow abstinence-based programs, they don’t have to worry about them going out partying all night and not showing up for work, or coming in late and hung over. The attitude of gratitude does an especially great job of boosting work-force morale, and others say that providing jobs for recovering addicts has given them some of the most loyal and committed members of their workforce.

Addiction Impacting the Economy

It is crucial for all of us to be aware of the economic impact of substance use disorder. Now, in the midst of an opioid crisis and overdose epidemic, it isn’t too hard to notice.

The abuse of alcohol and drugs in the workplace and the effects of chemical addiction on the workplace have emerged as the major health concern, eclipsing AIDS as the primary workplace concern of the decade.

According to information provided by the University of Pennsylvania Health System:

  • It is estimated that drug and alcohol abuse, including smoking, costs the nation $562 billion per year or almost 10% of the gross domestic product.
  • 3/4 of lost costs in industry are due to lost employment and reduced productivity
  • 25% is due to medical costs and the cost of treatment for addiction

Experts believe that between 10% and 23% of all workers use drugs on the job. Data collected through a survey on the cocaine hotline reported that 75% of the callers to the hotline had used drugs on the job.

That’s not even getting into the tens of billions of dollars a pop spent on things connected to substance abuse such as:

Turning it Around

When we play with the numbers, we can also see how once recovering addicts get back to work, not only to they contribute to the workforce, but they put more money back into the economy.

For example- in 2006 estimates show Americans spent:

With just these four drugs alone, the billions of dollars being put back into the economy would transform the financial landscape of the nation. So if even half of these people were given effective treatment to get off drugs, and then received jobs for recovering addicts, the amount of money and productivity flowing back into the economy would make an enormous footprint, not to mention the billions saved on those same services like criminal justice.

Ways to Find Jobs for Recovering Addicts

While many find that early on there are jobs for recovering addicts that may be less stressful and more flexible, like working in coffee shops or at restaurants, there are also some great career opportunities out there. Some companies even have programs specifically to offer jobs for recovering addicts.

If you’re having difficulty finding work as a recovering addict, there are many programs out there to help you. No matter where you live, it is likely there are organizations that can help transition back into the workforce.

America in Recovery

Patent engineer, founder, and CEO Larry Keast started Venturetech Drilling Technologies in his garage in 1980 to design and manufacture new drilling technologies for the oil business. The Houston-based company is now a well-respected international business.

A former Venturetech general manager who was in recovery from addiction first gave Larry Keast the idea to specifically recruit recovering addicts. According to Keast, it has paid off.

Keast was so inspired by his experience working with recovering addicts that he founded the nonprofit America in Recovery. This venture has also been good for business since people want to support the company’s mission. Keast says,

“We have a number of customers and vendors that donate to our non-profit and wholeheartedly agree with our hiring policies,”

America in Recovery runs several job sites for recovering addicts, ex-offenders, and older workers. Employers post vacancies on the site expecting applications from people with past drug and alcohol problems, so hopefully, it can eliminate the anxiety recovering addicts may feel about being denied for work.

State Help

Some states provide recovery support services that offer careers advice to former addicts. The support available from these programs can range from job search assistance and placements to help with paying for transportation to interviews. Some even run training and education programs for recovering substance abusers.

Just recently the Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine introduced “Recovery Ohio” plan. In his outline, he includes an initiative to provide incentives and reduced risks to business owners willing to offer a job for recovering addicts.

Different states all over the country have unique programs designed to promote the re-entry of former drug users into the workplace. You can look online to find resources in your area.

Why it Matters

It is understandable why many people are still going to be hesitant about hiring former drug users. It doesn’t always work out when hiring people who have struggled with substances, especially when they relapse. However, if any business owner is honest with themselves, even the non-recovering addicts don’t always work out. It is realistic enough to come across an underperforming employee without worrying about issues concerning addiction.

So why does it matter?

Well, because we are fighting such a serious drug problem in America. At the moment, we are struggling to curb the rising rates of overdose and death across the country. If we want to be able to win this fight, we have to be willing to train and work hard for it. Also, we have to have compassion for those who just want another chance. This is partially why so many recovering addicts end up getting jobs in the treatment industry; it provides a compassionate and enthusiastic atmosphere for those in recovery to give back while learning skills that will help them create career goals and build strong work ethics.

But besides compassion and commitment, we have to understand that for those recovering from addiction, recovery means more than just quitting the alcohol or the drugs. Recovery means creating a life worth having. Quality of life and adding hope through the opportunity to grow and contribute to the world gives someone a reason to work harder in recovery.

With that commitment, compassion, hope and hard work, the nation could see a moment uplifting not just for the economy, but for the society as a whole.

Before getting a job, building a future in recovery begins with doing the work to better yourself. Someone recovering from drug or alcohol use deserves the opportunity to build a foundation that can transform their life and help them succeed. If you or someone you love is struggling, please call toll-free now.

CALL NOW 1-800-951-6135

Do You Struggle With Debt Addiction?

Do You Struggle With Debt Addiction?

(This content is being used for illustrative purposes only; any person depicted in the content is a model)

Author: Shernide Delva

For many of us, our personal struggles reveal themselves in all aspects of our life, especially our finances. It may seem easier at the moment to ignore your money problems, but over time, mounting debt can lead to severe consequences…

A common result is debt addiction. Debt Addiction is more than compulsive shopping. A person with debt addiction uses debt as a crutch to solve their personal and financial problems. They hardly make a plan for getting out of the debt. Signs of debt addiction include living paycheck to paycheck and never planning for the future. Someone who struggles with debt addiction is always in a financial crisis, yet never manages to take care of themselves enough to pay off creditors.

There are a variety of signs of debt addiction.  Chances are, if you struggle with money, you already know that you do. It is easy to lose track of finances, even for the non-addict. However, when years or even decades past and no change has happened, that is a major sign that you have a debt addiction that needs addressing.

It can be confusing to understand debt addiction. After all, many people are in credit card debt or struggle with finances. Not everyone is a debt addict though. There is a difference between using your credit card because you have to, and using your credit card because you are angry, emotional or going through a rough time. Debt addiction is more of a mental issue than anything else. Often there is a mentality of “What does it matter if I put more on my card? I do not care about my balances, and I am going to ignore it.”

Those with debt addiction use debt as a way to avoid acknowledging that they do not have the money to provide for themselves or their desired lifestyle. Instead, they increase their debt and continue to ignore the problem. The good news is that there are ways to overcome debt addiction.

The first step is acknowledging you have a problem. I know, that may sound cliché, but it is true. There are groups like Debtors Anonymous, which is a 12-step fellowship group for those who struggle with debt addiction. Just by looking on the DA website, there is a long list of questions readers can ask themselves before going to a meeting.

Some of these questions include:

  • Are your debts making your home life unhappy?
  • Does the pressure of your debts distract you from your daily work?
  • Are your debts affecting your reputation?
  • Do your debts cause you to think less of yourself?
  • Do you ever fear that your employer, family or friends will learn the extent of your total indebtedness?
  • When faced with a difficult financial situation, does the prospect of borrowing give you an inordinate feeling of relief?
  • Has the pressure of your debts ever caused you to consider getting drunk?
  • Do you usually expect a negative response when you are subject to a credit investigation?
  • Have you ever developed a strict regimen for paying off your debts, only to break it under pressure?

More questions are found on the website, but those are some that stood out as  clear signs of debt addiction.  It is important to develop an action plan to deal with the debt. Facing the amount of debt you have is a big step to acknowledging the role you played in digging that financial hole.

Here are the four steps that can help you move forward:

  1. Make an inventory of your debt.
    Track the interest rates and total balance on everything you owe. You can also pull a free credit report to ensure everything is counted.
  2. Stop running new debt.
    If you can, stop using all credit cards. Make a budget that includes paying at least the minimal payment on all credit cards. You will also need to consider your needs seriously from you wants. That means fancy hair appointments and manicures may have to go. Only consider you daily necessities. Also, call your creditors and ask for help.
  3. Free up more cash to pay down debt.
    If your debt has become overwhelming, it is time to reevaluate your lifestyle and make some serious changes. You may have to consider living in a smaller home, driving an older car, reducing your utility bills. Do not think of it as a punishment. It is an investment in your future. Think of the freedom you will have when you no longer have to be burdened by debt.
  4. Consider Bankruptcy.
    Bankruptcy is a serious decision that should be discussed with a professional. However, if you are already cutting everything down to the bone, and still overwhelmed, bankruptcy may be an option for you. Bankruptcy could be looked at like an investment in your future. Still, it should not be considered lightly. Consider all other options first.
  5. Get support.
    There are so many people out there who have been in the same scenario as you. Search engines are your friend. Check out the many websites and blogs from others who are getting out of debt. Join Debtors Anonymous to have a support group that can keep you accountable. Talk to others about your struggle. You never know who might be willing to help. Stay focused and remember you are not alone.

Debt could be the one major thing keeping you from living life in recovery to the fullest. Instead of getting deeper into debt, you should focus on getting out of it. If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free 1-800-951-6135.

 

President Obama Seeks Over $1 Billion to Combat Drug Epidemic

President Obama Seeks Over $1 Billion to Combat Drug Epidemic

Author: Shernide Delva

President Barack Obama will make a budget request to Congress for $1 billion dollars to fight drug abuse and overdoses. The amount of overdoses in the United States is currently at an all-time high.  More than 47,000 people died from drug overdoses last year, according to the CDC. That exceeds the amount of deaths in traffic accidents.  Obama’s budget request aims to expand treatment specifically to those suffering from abusing prescription opioid painkillers as well those using cheaper drugs like heroin.

The majority of the $1 billion dollars would go to states under joint state-federal agreements increase the amount of people who have access to treatment. A smaller portion of $50 million would pay for a corps of 700 providers who know how to use drugs and therapy to treat drug addiction.

“Second, the President’s budget includes approximately $500 million — an increase of more than $90 million — to continue and build on current efforts across the Departments of Justice and Health and Human Services to expand state-level prescription drug overdose prevention strategies, increase the availability of medication-assisted treatment programs, improve access to the overdose-reversal drug naloxone, and support targeted enforcement activities,” the White House said in a statement.

The drug naloxone, more commonly known by its trade name Narcan, can quickly reverse the effects of an overdose. Many states and cities are ensuring that first responders have naloxone on hand to save the lives of those who have overdosed. Recently, a variety of efforts has been made to make Narcan more readily available. Everything from having school nurses has access to the drug to making the drug available over the counter at pharmacies.  With Narcan, the quicker a patient receives the drug, the better chance they have of surviving.

In the past, Obama has made it clear in the past that the opioid overdose epidemic is a priority for his Administration. Not long ago, the president issued a memorandum that served to combat the opioid epidemic through improving education and training as well as increase access to treatment.  In 2012, health care providers wrote 259 million prescriptions for opioid pain medications– enough for every American adult to have a bottle of pills.

Obama went to West Virginia in October to hear personal accounts from individuals and families affected by the epidemic. West Virginia has the highest rate of overdoses in the country.  He spoke to health care professionals, law enforcement officers, and community leaders working to prevent addiction and respond to its aftermath.

The President’s FY 2017 budget takes a two-pronged approach:

First, it includes $1 billion in new mandatory funding over two years to expand access to treatment for prescription drug abuse and heroin use.  The funds are allotted in the following ways:

  • $920 million to support and expand access to medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorders. States can use these funds to expand treatment capacity and make services more affordable.
  • $50 million in National Health Service Corps funding to expand access to substance use treatment providers. This funding will make it possible for close to 700 providers to provide substance use disorder treatment services in areas across the country most in need of behavioral health providers.
  • $30 million to identify and evaluate the effectiveness of various treatment programs. This money would be used to understand the real-world conditions of drug abuse and understand the unique needs of patients with opioid use disorders.

Second, the president will increase the budget by close to 90 million for the Department of Justice (DOJ) and Health and Human Services (HHS). The increase in funds will be used to continue to implement prevention strategies as well as increase the availability of medication-assisted treatment programs. The budget includes an HHS pilot program for nurse practitioners and physician assistants to prescribe buprenorphine for opioid use disorder treatment, where allowed by state law.  Another objective is to increase access to Naloxone (Narcan) with these funds.  The budget includes an HHS pilot program for nurse practitioners and physician assistants to prescribe buprenorphine for opioid use disorder treatment, where allowed by state law.

Along with President Obama’s announcement come several proposals from presidential candidates for the upcoming election. It is clear that the drug epidemic is going to be a critical topic to tackle in the next coming years.  If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free 1-800-951-6135

Crazy News Stories of the Week

moneycrazy

Author: Shernide Delva

It’s Friday! Hope you had a wonderful week. This week, we wrap up the top crazy news stories that circulated all over social media. Tons of stories this week grabbed our attention and these are just a few that stood out to me that relate to addiction. Which one stood out to you?

1. Kris Jenner Offers Son $1 Million to Check Into Rehab

Would a million dollars get you sober? Kris Jenner seems to think it might work for her son. Recent reports have revealed that Kris Jenner is trying to get her son, Rob Kardashian sober by offering him a $1 million to check into rehab.

Rob Kardashian had struggled with weight gain and is rumored to have an addiction to painkillers, Xanax and other substances. The 28-year-old was recently diagnosed with type-2 diabetes after being rushed to the hospital for stomach problems in December.

“She thinks that one way to get through to him might be by using money,” a source close to the Kardashian family stated.

However, getting Rob Kardashian sober might not be Kris Jenner’s only motivation.

“Kris looks at Rob’s health crisis as a potential storyline for the show,” said the source. “She wants him to let cameras inside of his struggle because she believes that his downward spiral would make for great ratings.”

Jenner has reportedly ordered a private chef, psychologist, nutritionist and therapist to help her son, yet according to sources, she still has yet to go to the hospital to visit him personally.

2.  Newlyweds Come Home to Airbnb Guests’ Cocaine-Fueled Orgy

I’ve heard of horrible wedding night stories but this one tops the cake.  A couple, Justin Smith and Francisco Peres, came home on their wedding night to find a coke-fueled orgy happening in their home. First, we must premise this story by saying the couple had allowed renters to stay in their Montreal apartment through Airbnb after forgetting to disable instant booking.

If you do not know what Airbnb is, it’s a website for people to list, find, and rent lodging to each other. It basically works as a hotel however you are booking rooms in people’s homes and not hotel rooms. The couple had forgotten to remove the “instant booking” feature which allows customers to reserve a room without having to get approved from the host.

After realizing their error, the couple tried to cancel the reservation because it was their wedding night; however the guests begged and begged to stay since it was New Year’s Eve. They reluctantly agreed. Imagine their surprise when the newlyweds walked in and saw the place was a mess, with half the food in their kitchen eaten and the living room filled with garbage.

It gets worse. After grudgingly going to sleep, the couple was awoken to sounds at 5 a.m. of snorting cocaine, loud bangs and drunken stumbling and sex sounds. The morning after the aftermath, they awoke to strangers perusing their home. The renters apologized profusely and left a note seeking forgiveness for their behavior. They also helped to clean up the mess of the night.

“They’re like, 20-22, just being dumb kids but did their best to make it right,” Smith noted. “Still less than ideal way of starting my day, but could have been worse.”

3. Middle School Teacher Coach Charged with Taking Student’s Pills

A middle school teacher is facing felony charges for reportedly stealing her student’s antidepressant medication. Tania Gerving, who worked at Horizon Middle School in Bismarck, North Dakota, has been placed on administrative leave while officials conduct a full investigation.  From Sept. 12. To Oct. 12, police placed surveillance camera in the school and observed Gerving entering an area where the school stored medication and opening a bottle sitting on the counter. She then put the pills in her pocket before placing the bottle back on the counter.

Officer Joshua Brown said Gerving has admitted to taking the pills without permission. She is not responsible for administering medication and would have no reason to handle them.  Gerving was sentenced to jail with a set bail at $1500. She is not allowed to enter areas within Bismarck Public School District where controlled substances are stored and must wear a drug patch as a condition of her bond. Further action will depend on what happens with the criminal complaint in court.

4. Internet Addict Develops Painful Disease

Apparently, social media is bad for more than just your mental health. It can actually have serious physical side effects too.  A notorious internet addict has developed a painful disease from hunching over her computer. Michele Gore spent 23 hours a day online at one point, which caused her to develop a painful stomach disease called Tietze disease at the age of 21.

After visiting her doctor, she was told that her addiction had put a strain on her rib cartilage, causing the inflammatory disorder – which is characterized by chest pain and swelling between the upper ribs. As a result, he was told to significantly reduce her time online. She realized the day after Christmas how much her addiction was controlling her life.

“I had the laptop wire round my leg, my headphones around my neck, my mobile under my pillow, my tablet charging on my bedside table and my Xbox and PlayStation controls at the foot of the bed. I thought, ‘this isn’t normal’,”she said.

Gore is now spending time away from the internet and is seeking professional treatment for her addiction. She hopes to raise awareness about the reality of internet addiction to others who may be suffering.

5. Tucson Starbucks Plans to Add Liquor to Menu

Residents at a local Starbucks chain are drinking more than coffee these days. A Starbucks at Tucson, Arizona is adding booze to its menu. A few years ago, select Starbucks locations began selling liquor as part of their “evening menu.” Now, many Starbucks locations are jumping on board.

Many customers are excited about the possibility of having a shot along with their double shot of espresso. Starbuck’s first announced in 2010 that they were considering adding wine and craft beer to the menu to help boost business after 4 p.m. when sales tend to dwindle.

However, some customers are concerned about their local coffee shop turning into a bar.

“Downside is that Starbucks has never really been an alcohol type of place so it could change just based on the environment,” customer Ben Strobeck said.

The city council will unanimously vote to approve the liquor license on Tuesday, Jan. 5.  If the city council does approve the application, it would then move to the State Liquor Board, which has the final say. If all passes approval, alcohol could be at the Tucson location as early as spring.

There you have it. Your crazy news stories of the week. Now, you can feel grateful you are healthy and happy in your life in sobriety. However, if you are struggling, remember you are not alone. If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free 1-800-951-6135.

Money and Work Addiction

Money and Work Addiction

Money and work addiction, in some ways, can be just as harmful as substance addiction. In a society that prides the hard-working kind, it can be difficult to know when to stop. After all, working hard is respectable right? Not exactly.

Work and Money are commonly seen as ‘respectable’ addictions due the fact that the benefits are increases in financial independence and the ability to progress further in one’s career. However, when work completely overwhelms and takes away from a person’s life, it can become a serious problem.

Believe it or not, some people have worked themselves to death. Money is essential for our daily existence and unfortunately overworking can lead to depression and even substance abuse. An article on money and work addiction mentions how 21-year-old  Moritz Erhardt was found dead after a 72-hour stint of working at the financial management company Merrill Lynch. Some have even committed suicide due to work-related stress.

Money can alleviate the suffering associated with not have enough. As a society, money, for many, becomes  “the source of our security, success, happiness, peace, popularity, and prestige. If we have it, we will have life. If not we will forever be unfulfilled” (Courtney Bourns 1982).

Work and money addictions are known as process addictions and fall into the same bracket as eating disorders and gambling addictions.  Addiction professionals now recognize process addictions like gambling, porn addiction and shopping addiction as legitimate disorders, however it can be difficult to diagnose work or money related addictions

In an attempt to measure out relationship with money, Bonnie denDooven, a researcher with IITAP – the International Institute of Trauma and Addiction Professionals, developed a screen tool that identifies 16 different manifestations that play into our relationship with money.

Areas such as:

  • Money obsession
  • Problematic wealth
  • Under-earning
  • Deprivation
  • Money aversion (financial anorexia)
  • Adrenaline jobs
  • Dysfunctional relational attachment

While there are no accepted instruments to test these issues, practitioners can determine if a client has a problem dependent upon these seven questions:

  1. Tolerance: Does the client increase the amounts of their behavior overtime?
  2. Withdrawal: Are there withdrawal symptoms from ceasing this behavior?
  3. Continuation despite harm: Even with negative side effects such as physical, psychological, or financial harm, does the client continue the behavior?
  4. Loss of control: Is the client unable to control their behavior for long periods of time?
  5. Attempts to cut down: Has the client made conscious, but unsuccessful, efforts to reduce the behaviors?
  6. Salience: Does the client spend time planning, exhibiting, or recovering from the behavior and its effect.
  7. Reduced involvement: How has the behavior affected the client’s personal life? Has the client reduce involvement in family, social, and recreational activities due to the behaviors?

Money and work addiction stem from insecurity—a belief that we are not good enough. The belief drives us into addictive behaviors because we earn our validation from how much we can achieve and do.

Financial insecurity plays a huge role in our working behavior. A person obsessed with working and money may have struggled financially in the past and is striving to avoid that situation from reoccurring at all costs. Still, even after achieving financial stability, they may continue this working pattern in an addictive and compulsive manner.

There is a “rush” that money addicts feel when they think of making money and excelling in their occupation. Achievements release the happy ‘feel good’ chemical dopamine, as well as serotonin which are responsible for pride and status. However, when we experience loss, our brain releases cortisol, the chemical responsible for stress and anxiety. It can become a dangerous cycle

Cortisol

  • Shuts off our immune system
  • Creates paranoia
  • Inhibits release of oxytocin
  • Makes us less empathetic and generous.

Oxytocin:

  • Promotes Feelings of love, trust and friendship
  • Boosts immune system
  • Increases creativity
  • Inhibits addiction

As you can see, money can medicate our ‘less than’ feelings of insecurity but the danger is that this relationship can spin out of control. When working with money and love addiction, areas like denial, insecurity, depression, and compulsiveness are addressed often in a therapeutic setting.

Money does not always make us happy like we expect it to and making work and money your only priority can lead to many consequences. If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free 1-800-951-6135

Author: Shernide Delva

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