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Could Creatine Help Treat Meth Addiction?

Male athlete holding protein drink

(This content is being used for illustrative purposes only; any person depicted in the content is a model)

Could a workout supplement help treat meth addiction? According to recent research, this may be a real possibility. Researchers at Montana State University just launched a study to determine if the supplement creatine monohydrate could treat dependence to meth.

Creatine is an insanely popular muscle building supplement well-known in the fitness industry for its ability to help with gaining muscle mass. Creatine works by allowing the body to produce more energy rapidly. With more energy, you can train harder and that produces faster results.

It was interesting to read that a supplement so popular in the fitness community could be beneficial for meth addiction. Furthermore, Tracy Hellem, PhD, an assistant professor of the College of Nursing at Montana State led the study to examine the amino acid’s efficacy in reducing symptoms of depression and anxiety in meth users.

Participants in the study were male and females between the ages of 18 and 59 who had symptoms of depression and anxiety. They were given eight weeks of treatment with creatine and two follow-up visits. The results were positive.  Participants who suffered from mental illness and used meth found that the drug helped them by boosting their energy levels and decreasing their appetitive. The drug was also able to create the need to sleep. However, consistent use also led to feels of depression which increased the user’s intake of the drug.

Hellem first thought of the idea of treating meth addiction with creating when she was finishing her studies at the University of Utah. During her studies, her professor of psychiatry, Dr. Perry Renshaw, had used magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to determine that people with mood disorders and substance abuse issues actually had deficiencies in their brain cell production. As a result, both Renshaw and Hellem hypothesized that creatine used by athletes to build body mass and strength, as well as energy and stamina, might also reduce the depression and anxiety in these individuals.

The study was initially successful in producing favorable results which prompted more studies like this one just released. The current study included patients with anxiety disorder as well as addiction to methamphetamine.

“This will be the first study of creatine that includes a triple diagnosis: depression, anxiety, and methamphetamine dependence,” said Hellem.

Creatine is one of the most researched sports supplements and has gained immense popularity over the few years as more fitness professionals are recommending the supplement for its muscle building potential. Creatine has been proven to work for activities like weight training, sprinting and other sports. It is effective in helping build muscle fibers in those who combine the supplement with exercise. Some side effects ranging from cramping to kidney problems have occasionally been reported however for most people, creatine is very safe to use.

Overall, creatine could be an effective supplement to use to help aid with meth addiction; however it is not a cure, simply a treatment option. There are a lot of nutritional options to help with rebuilding energy depletion when overcoming symptoms of withdrawal. It seems as though the supplement would benefit with treating symptoms of withdrawal and dependence due to its energy lifting properties. The more healthy a person feels, the better chance they have of a full recovery.

Still, it is only one part of the equation of treatment and a person with a meth addiction should treat their condition in s trained professional atmosphere with careful monitoring.  Still, learning different options that can aid with the recovery process is very beneficial as a whole. If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free 1-800-951-6135.

Author: Shernide Delva

Maine Has More Meth Labs than Ever

Maine has More Meth Labs than Ever

Author: Justin Mckibben

Methamphetamine is one of the most intimidating drugs out there for addicts and non-addicts alike. The photos of meth users are enough to shock anyone even meth users themselves. So is it true that the US has a meth epidemic? That question may not have the most definitive answer, but it is indisputable that meth is extremely addictive, very destructive, and just all around bad for you, and meth labs are on the rise in certain areas.

The Maine Meth Problem

Law enforcement officials in Maine are currently over-exerted in their resources and manpower in a progressive struggle to stop methamphetamine labs in their state, and it seems that this trend of cook-houses doesn’t seem to be going anywhere anytime too soon. Officials from the Maine Drug Enforcement Agency (MDEA) reported that they dismantled 28 labs 2014, which is 12 more than in 2013, and more than 6 times as many in 2011!

That rate of increase is pretty radical, and those numbers do not even include the number of “dump sites” where chemicals and other materials used to make meth are disposed of. Even without that estimate it is probably safe to presume that more and more meth is being produced in the area than ever before, and that alone is a dangerous and volatile situation for Maine.

MDEA Resources

So you may be asking why is it a problem if the labs are being torn down? It is a victory each time some drugs are taken on the streets, even a little bit. But MDEA spends more than $10,000 of its budget to dismantle each lab individually, and that figure does not include the expenses incurred by local police and firefighters who are also often called into the scene due to the high incident of fires and explosions caused by chemicals that are associated with clearing out and disposing of meth labs.

However, despite the increased number of lab locations, this may not mean what people assume it means at first glance. MDEA officials believe that the rise in lab numbers actually has nothing to do with being part of expanded trafficking in the state, so it’s not that the real-life Breaking Bad crew came in and started up a new empire or anything like that.

They actually attribute the increase in labs being found to improvement in the training procedures for local law enforcement agencies, causing them to have gotten better at finding such operations. One piece of the puzzle that supports this theory is that the treatment levels for meth addiction in Maine having experienced only slight growth over the last few years, and actually runs below the statistics reported back in 2006, according to the Office of Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services.

Still, the cost of fighting this branch of the ‘war on drugs’ does exists, and the MDEA hopes that they will be getting some assistance for the coming year ahead. The Maine officials are hoping that a $900,000 federal grant will be approved that could provide greater assistance in their efforts to postpone and possibly subdue the growing meth labs in the area. The grant, which the state announced in October 2014, will allow the state to hire 4 new drug agents and buy specialized equipment for first responders to lab sites, making the entire team more efficient in facing the rising meth issue head on.

Currently, the most effective meth addiction treatment is a combination of behavioral therapies such as cognitive behavioral and contingency management interventions. A comprehensive behavioral treatment approach includes behavioral therapy, family education, individual counseling, drug testing for accountability, and encouragement for clean and sober activities combined with an active aftercare program.

There doesn’t have to be a high concentration of meth labs, or even meth addicts in your area for you to be an addict, and it may seem impossible, but people do it every day and there are those that want to help. If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free 1-800-951-3561

Treatment for Meth Addiction in Kansas City, Missouri

Treatment for Meth Addiction in Kansas City, Missouri

(This content is being used for illustrative purposes only; any person depicted in the content is a model)

Author: Justin Mckibben

When talking about looking for treatment for meth addiction in Kansas City, Missouri  it is important to taking several factors into consideration, especially in regard to what exactly meth is and how it affects the user.

As with any addiction there are also the signs of serious physical dependency, the long-term effects on the body, and the symptoms of withdrawal that should be factored in when someone struggling with meth addiction wants to give up using for good.

Treatment for Meth Addiction in Kansas City, Missouri: What is Meth?

The term “meth” is short for methamphetamine, which is a highly addictive stimulant that affects the central nervous system. Methamphetamine causes increased activity and talkativeness, decreased appetite, and a general sense of well-being. Street names include:

  • Speed
  • Crank
  • Glass
  • Chalk
  • Crystal
  • Ice

Treatment for Meth Addiction in Kansas City, Missouri: Medical uses

Medical uses for methamphetamine are limited. Methamphetamine is often the active ingredient in medications prescribed for treating ADHD and certain cases of obesity. Off-label uses include the treatment of narcolepsy and for cases of treatment-resistant depression.

So when looking for treatment for meth addiction in Kansas City, Missouri it is important to understand that even if you have developed this problem based off of a prescription medication, you will still benefit from the right recovery program.

Treatment for Meth Addiction in Kansas City, Missouri: Recreational use

The recreational use of meth is for the desired “high” it produces, like any other drug. More specifically meth users experience a euphoric rush, as well as experiencing increased wakefulness and physical activity and decreased appetite.

Methamphetamine causes cardiovascular problems, so users run a serious health risk with each use. Some of the cardiovascular effects include:

  • Rapid heart rate
  • Irregular heartbeat
  • Increased blood pressure

Hyperthermia, which is when one experiences an extremely elevated body temperature, and convulsions can occur from an overdose of meth. If the individual experiencing this is not treated immediately, a meth overdose can cause death.

Treatment for Meth Addiction in Kansas City, Missouri: Long-term affects

One of the most detrimental long term effects of meth use and abuse is addiction. Treatment for Meth Addiction in Kansas City, Missouri is one of the many necessary steps someone struggles with meth addiction should consider taking in order to get clean.

In addition, long term meth users experience psychosis, with symptoms that include:

  • Paranoia
  • Hallucinations
  • Repetitive motor activity
  • Changes in brain structure and function

As well as experiencing:

  • Memory loss
  • Aggressive or violent behavior
  • Mood disturbances
  • Severe dental problems
  • Weight loss

The Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) collects information on drug-related episodes from hospital emergency rooms throughout the nation. Between 1995 and 2002 DAWN has reported a greater than 50% increase in the number of ER visits related to meth abuse. So treatment for meth addiction in Kansas City, Missouri has become increasingly relevant over time.

Luckily, the treatment for meth addiction overall has also increased substantially. In 1992, there were approximately 21,000 treatment admissions in which meth was identified as the primary drug responsible for the individuals addiction issue. That represents more than 1% of all treatment admissions. By 2004, the number of methamphetamine treatment admissions increased to more than 150,000, representing 8% of all admissions.

Treatment for Meth Addiction in Kansas City, Missouri: Withdrawal

One of the most important pieces of the puzzle that makes treatment for meth addiction in Kansas City, Missouri so essential is because the withdrawal can be uncomfortable at the least, and can lead to a potentially fatal situation in the worst cases.

Once a meth addict stops using, they experience  a number of disorientating and sometimes painful withdrawal symptoms, including:

  • Fatigue
  • Depression
  • Increased appetite
  • Excessive sleeping
  • Anxiety
  • Irritability
  • Headaches
  • Suicidal ideation (obsessive thoughts of suicide)

Treatment for Meth Addiction in Kansas City, Missouri

Currently, the most effective Treatment for Meth Addiction in Kansas City, Missouri and anywhere treating meth addiction is a combination of behavioral therapies such as cognitive behavioral and contingency management interventions.

Contingency management interventions are used for the treatment for meth addiction in Kansas City, Missouri to help provide the person suffering with some tangible recompenses in exchange for complying with treatment while maintaining abstinence.

Comprehensive behavioral treatment approaches include a variety of different courses that are integrated in order to try and build a well-rounded foundation. This includes:

These methods, along with consistent accountability through drug tests and encouragement through sober activities and have been shown to be effective in the treatment for meth addiction and abuse.

As for medications, there are no one cure-all pills with the specific purpose of the treatment for meth addiction in Kansas City, Missouri . However, there has been some research that shows that the use of certain anti-depressants has decreased cravings that arise, and these medications even diminish the high that is experienced when the meth addict actually uses.

While many people who are battling with a meth addiction aren’t aware of any way to get out of their addiction, treatment for Meth Addiction in Kansas City, Missouri is available to help, as well as other resources and experts in other areas that are more than happy to work with you on your recovery. If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free 1-800-951-6135

Meth Addiction Treatment in Anderson County, TN

Meth Addiction Treatment in Anderson County, TN

Author: Justin Mckibben

According to a report by the state of Tennessee’s comptroller’s Offices of Education Research and Accountability the production of Methamphetamine throughout Tennessee remains drastically high despite the use of a database that tracks pseudoephedrine purchases. Pseudoephedrine is an ingredient in some cold and allergy medicines that meth cooks use to make the illegal stimulant. With such a visible issue going on with the production, sale, and use of meth in the state of Tennessee it is no wonder that there is a real need for meth addiction treatment in Anderson County, TN.

Meth Addiction Treatment in Anderson County, TN: A Growing Concern

This report by the Offices of Education Research and Accountability came just days before the General Assembly was set to convene, and there was some hope that it would provide additional ammunition for legislators who want to move forward on a proposed bill that would require a prescription for pseudoephedrine. 18 Tennessee municipalities have passed ordinances prior to these reports that create the requirement for a prescription with the purchase of any products containing pseudoephedrine. But the ordinances were made insufficient this past December after the state attorney general’s office ruled they were in direct conflict with Tennessee state law.

Statewide, even though lab seizures fell by 7 percent for 2013, Tennessee still ranked second in the nation after Indiana citing preliminary figures for 2013.

In 2013, a total of 1,685 labs were seized, which generated 21,000 pounds of meth drug waste, according to figures.

Meth Addiction Treatment in Anderson County, TN: Long-term effects of Meth

Taking all the information about the problem facing the state about meth addiction and the need for reform, meth addiction treatment in Anderson County, TN is set in place to combat the bigger dangers faced by individuals who suffer from this wide-spread problem.

One of the most detrimental long term effects of crystal meth use and abuse is addiction. Therefore, it is best to consider meth addiction treatment in Anderson Country, TN to safely and medically monitor the effects of meth. In addition, long term meth users experience symptoms such as:

  • Psychosis (paranoia, hallucinations, repetitive motor activity)
  • Changes in brain structure and function
  • Memory loss
  • Aggressive or violent behavior
  • Mood disturbances
  • Severe dental problems
  • Weight loss

The Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN), which collects information on drug-related episodes from hospital emergency rooms throughout the nation, has reported a greater than 50% increase in the number of ER visits related to meth abuse between 1995 and 2002 nation-wide.

Crystal meth abuse has also increased substantially. In 1992, there were approximately 21,000 treatment admissions in which crystal meth was identified as the primary drug of abuse, representing more than 1% of all treatment admissions. By 2004, the number of methamphetamine treatment admissions increased to more than 150,000, representing 8% of all admissions.

Meth Addiction Treatment in Anderson County, TN: Meth Withdrawal

Meth addiction treatment in Anderson County, TN is crucial for anyone struggling with the addiction because the withdrawal from crystal meth can be uncomfortable to say the very least, and at its worst can lead to a potentially fatal situation. Once crystal meth addicts stop using, they experience several withdrawal symptoms which vary in intensity, such as:

  • Fatigue
  • Depression
  • Increased appetite
  • Excessive sleeping
  • Anxiety
  • Irritability
  • Headaches
  • Suicidal ideation (obsessive thoughts of suicide)

Meth Addiction Treatment in Anderson County, TN: Detox and Rehab

Currently, the most effective crystal meth addiction treatment is a combination of therapies such as cognitive behavioral therapy and contingency management interventions. This is best done in a safe and comfortable setting known as inpatient rehab. A good crystal meth addiction treatment program will offer a medical detox as well as a 30 day inpatient stay during which the person who is addicted to crystal meth can begin the healing and recovery process.

Meth Addiction Treatment in Anderson County, TN: Intensive Outpatient Programs

An intensive outpatient program (IOP) should absolutely be implemented as part of meth addiction treatment in Anderson County, TN if at all possible. This is a program that will continue to offer comprehensive behavioral therapeutic support including behavioral therapy, family education, individual counseling, and 12-Step support groups during the period after the time spent in the inpatient rehab facility. IOP is designed to assist the individual in the transition back into the world while they can begin to enjoy more freedom and less structure.

Meth Addiction Treatment in Anderson County, TN: Sober Living House

While attending the IOP, it is also typically suggested for the recovering addict to live in a sober living house or a halfway house especially while in early recovery. Here they will continue to receive support and be given a level of structure while beginning the process of reentering society. There is drug testing for accountability, peer support, and encouragement for clean and sober activities. This strategy for continued recovery has proven to be effective in the later stages of recovery for meth addiction, and meth addiction treatment in Anderson County, TN provides options to seek this level of support out after rehab.

Crystal meth has made its presence known in the state of Tennessee, and while there is much effort being put into regulating the chemicals used to manufacture this drug, there is still a need for treating the addicts who already suffer. If you or someone you know is struggling with a substance abuse or addiction or is seeking crystal meth addiction treatment in Anderson County, TN please call toll-free at 1-800-951-6135. We can help. You are not alone. 

Drug Abuse by Region: Midwest

Drug Abuse by Region: Midwest

Here it is, another installment of Drug Abuse by Region. In the Midwest, the drug of choice is methamphetamine. This probably comes as no surprise to many, what with pop culture references making the Midwest notorious for its industry of meth labs. But there is a history lesson here, steeped in agriculture, economics, and politics that accounts for such a prevalence of meth in this region of the United States.

The methamphetamine panic really began to build by the mid-2000s. But, the events leading up to this epidemic began to unfold well before that.

Perhaps because of how easy it is to make – you can make meth out of readily available industrial and pharmaceutical products, a twenty-first-century version of moonshine was born.

Drug Abuse by Region: Midwest

The “Heartland”

What allowed meth to capture the public imagination so fully was the way in which it attacked the beliefs that Americans had about their beloved heartland: a picturesque landscape with an ideal wholesomeness of decency and morality. Perhaps one of the most shocking aspects of meth is its clientele: the same predominantly white small-town residents who had witnessed from a safe distance, the ravages of crack cocaine on the more urban areas of the country and who had told themselves that they weren’t that kind of people.

Drug Abuse by Region: Midwest

Manufacturing Meth

A crumbled local agricultural economy turned out to be a windfall. Falling tax revenues had left local law enforcement underfunded, understaffed, and unable to stop the growing manufacture a selling of meth. Hard-up fertilizer suppliers and farmers were happy to cut deals on large volumes of anhydrous ammonia, a fertilizer ingredient that is also used in meth processing. And unlike other drugs, meth didn’t require contraband raw materials from South America or Southeast Asia.

Its most ‘exotic’ ingredient at the time, ephedrine, was also used to make cold medication – which meant that efforts by the DEA to place restrictions on its importation were routinely thwarted by the pharmaceutical lobby and its congressional champions, who guaranteed that ephedrine would remain free of federal regulation. Not since Prohibition had an illegal drug been so easy to make inconspicuously by anyone with a high school-grade knowledge of chemistry.

Drug Abuse by Region: Midwest

Meth: A Lesson in History

Meth, also called crystal meth, was not a new drug. It had first been manufactured by a Japanese chemist nearly a century earlier. It had only recently fallen from favor as a legal prescription narcotic, and was and has been a go-to by long-haul truckers to enable them to pull off inhuman stints without sleep in order to deliver their goods across the country. It was even advertised in women’s magazines to housewives as an aid for increasing their energy and overall perkiness, as well as prescribed to American GIs, during World War II. As the legal market for meth had diminished, however, an increasing illegal trade had emerged, built on a small group of professional suppliers in Southern California and a network of motorcycle gangs that distributed the drug elsewhere.

But it was Lori Kaye Arnold, the wife of a biker gang member and sister of comedian Tom Arnold, whose own innovations in the late ’80s transformed meth into a rural Midwestern phenomenon. After first setting up Ottumwa, Iowa as the premier heartland distribution hub for Californian meth, Arnold decided to borrow a page from Monsanto and better integrate her supply chain, building her own production facilities, which were to become the first Midwestern meth lab in Iowa.

If you or a loved one is struggling with meth addiction or another addiction, please call toll-free 1-800-951-6135. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.alternet.org/

http://www.motherjones.com/

 

 

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