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Safe, effective drug/alcohol treatment

All across this country in small towns, rural areas and cities, alcoholism and drug abuse are destroying the lives of men, women and their families. Where to turn for help? What to do when friends, dignity and perhaps employment are lost?

The answer is Palm Partners Recovery Center. It’s a proven path to getting sober and staying sober.

Palm Partners’ innovative and consistently successful treatment includes: a focus on holistic health, a multi-disciplinary approach, a 12-step recovery program and customized aftercare. Depend on us for help with:

Opinion: Does Court-Ordered Drug Treatment Work?

court ordered drug treatmentIt has been a long held belief that addicts and alcoholics must want to get sober in order to get sober. Or that they can’t be forced into sobriety. I can definitely see why this belief exists because many addicts and alcoholics won’t get sober until they are ready and willing to do it for themselves. But this isn’t always the case. And often times addicts and alcoholics don’t know their drug use and drinking has put them on death’s front door until it is too late. That is why court-ordered drug treatment is available.

But does court ordered drug treatment work?

Often times, yes it does. Unfortunately getting exact numbers on how court ordered drug treatment fares in comparison to a regular treatment center is difficult. This is because even the numbers for people who choose to go to drug treatment are skewed by relapse and what the definition of success in sobriety even is. Often times relapse is part of the process and it takes an individual a few times through treatment before it sticks. Once it sticks though, does that mean that the individual wasn’t successful due to the relapses? Whatever the case may be it is probably smart to assume that while the numbers or success rate for court ordered drug treatment may not be as high it is still just almost just as effective as any other drug treatment program. And that’s because even the success rates of the best drug treatment centers aren’t very high.

The opinion

I believe that court ordered drug treatment serves an important purpose in the lives of many addicts and alcoholics, as well as their families. I myself was court ordered to a detox center and it worked for me. I took the next step into drug treatment afterwards. I think often times addicts and alcoholics don’t want drug treatment simply because they are comfortable getting high. I feel, if they got the chance though to see what sobriety could be like and that they didn’t have to do that anymore they might feel differently about using and drinking. Alcoholics and addicts don’t have the foresight, because of their disease, to realize how drug treatment could help them until after they have completed drug treatment. This was exactly my story. I did not want to go to detox, when I was in detox I was much more receptive once my head started to clear, and now after the fact I thank God often that I was involuntarily sent there because I probably would have never gotten help if I hadn’t been. All in all, addicts and alcoholics don’t have to want to get sober to stay sober. I am living proof of that. Sometimes addicts and alcoholics don’t know what they need and when they get it, they are glad they did.

Court ordered drug treatment can work. And the reason it doesn’t for some is because of many different factors not just that the addict and alcoholic doesn’t want it. For instance, a judge is setting the amount of time that an addict or alcoholic has to be in treatment and a judge is not a doctor. The judge may require much too short of mandatory stay than is necessary. If the addict or alcoholic stayed longer they might be more successful but often times after only a short period of time, in court ordered drug treatment or not, the addict or alcoholic thinks they are well again and they are not.

Either way court ordered drug treatment saves lives and while it may or may not have high rates of people staying sober for the rest of their lives, most treatment centers don’t.

If you or your loved one is in need of drug treatment please don’t hesitate to call us at toll-free: 1-800-951-6135

Can I force my child to get drug treatment?

an I force my child to get drug treatment

Can I force my child to get drug treatment is the question many parents ask when their loved one that is abusing drugs is absolutely refusing and unwilling to seek help for themselves. It is scary to have a child that is using drugs and drinking dangerously and won’t help themselves. A parent feels as if it is their job to protect their children from pretty much everything. So what can you do as a parent if you have a child who is bad off on drugs and alcohol and won’t go to rehab? Luckily, there are things in place for just this scenario and you can force rehab if it is absolutely necessary. The hope, to force rehab is that the person once they get to rehab would give it a try.

Force rehab with an intervention:

If your child refuses to go to rehab and you must force rehab then staging an intervention may be a way to make that person understand that people care and that their behavior is hurting themselves and the other people around them that they love. Conveniently enough there are people who specialize in helping you stage an intervention with your child to force rehab. It is not recommended that you try to force rehab with an intervention on your own. An intervention is usually a surprise to the person and themore people who are close to that person who can tell him or her how they feel about their drug use and drinking the better because the more it can force rehab with that person. The goal is to show the person how much you care and that they need to get help through a rehab facility.

Force rehab with the Baker act:

If a person is over eighteen that is when the Baker Act would want to be used. If the person you are trying to force rehab with was under eighteen you could simply make them go. Unfortunately if they are over 18 they have a say in the matter and that’s where the Baker Act comes in. The Baker Act or the Florida Mental Health Act of 1971, allows for involuntary examination (what some call emergency or involuntary commitment). It can be initiated by judges, law enforcement officials, physicians, or mental health professionals. There must be evidence that the person:

  • Has a mental illness (as defined in the Baker Act)
  • Is a harm to self, harm to others, or self-neglectful (as defined in the Baker Act)

Force rehab with the Marchman Act:

The Marchman Act is somewhat similar to the Baker Act (involuntary commitment) and is especially helpful for those individuals who are over the age of 18 and don’t want to seek out help through a rehab on their own. Forcing rehab with the Marchman Act allows you to put an individual in rehab for up to 48 hours without any mental illness or other issues and the hold is usually released after the 48 hours is up unless the person asks for help themselves at that time. Each state has varying laws when it comes to the Marchman Act so if you want to use this to force rehab check out your state’s laws.

If you want to force rehab realize that it may be unrealistic to expect your child to get well. Most addicts and alcoholics have to want help in order to get sober and stay sober. There are many instances though where parents force rehab and the child goes on to live a happy and fulfilling life. In fact if the parents hadn’t forced rehab they may not even be alive today. So if you feel it is necessary never hesitate to force rehab it could save your loved one’s life.

For more information on how to stage an intervention or how to use the Florida Baker Act or Marchman Act to force your loved one to get drug treatment, please give us a call at 800-951-6135.

How Can I Get Someone Psychiatric Care?

How To Get Someone Psychiatric Care

Getting someone psychiatric help is an emotional and stomach turning thing to do but sometimes it is for their own good and it must be done. The procedure for getting some psychiatric help varies from state to state but in general an involuntary commitment is done by a doctor, therapist, and/or court. In many cases getting someone psychiatric help through an involuntary commitment is done after they have done something that makes them a danger to themselves or others. It is not easy but sometimes getting someone psychiatric help is absolutely necessary.

For psychiatric help that is involuntary

If  you feel that a person is an immediate danger to themselves or to others then dial 991 and get emergency assistance. It’s better to be safe now than sorry later. Calling the police or emergency services on a loved one can be a very tough thing to do but it’s important to know that you are not doing it to hurt them. You have to emotionally detach yourself from the situation at hand and think of their safety and the safety of other people.

Someone who is in danger of seriously injuring themselves or another because they are not in a stable mindset is not their fault. They need someone to intervene and sometimes that person is going to have to be you. Although it may not sound ideal at the time having phoned for emergency help can you later on in court if and when you need to show proof as to why this person needs to be monitored and evaluated by a mental health professional.

If you are in Florida you have the Florida Marchman Act and the Florida Baker Act on your side.

What is the Florida Marchman Act?

A Marchman Act is a means of providing an individual in need of substance abuse services with emergency services and temporary detention for substance abuse evaluation and treatment when required, either on a voluntary or involuntary basis.

What is the Florida Baker Act?

The Florida Baker Act is actually the Florida Mental Health Act of 1971. The Florida Baker Act allows for involuntary examination or what some know it as, involuntary commitment. The Florida Baker Act can be initiated by judges, law enforcement, physicians or mental health professionals. In order for an individual to have the Florida Baker Act initiated on them there must be proof that the person has a mental illness or is a danger to themselves, a danger to others or is self-neglectful.

Other Options for Involuntary Psychiatric Care…

  • Visit your city or county courthouse to get someone psychiatric help. This will need to be done in the district where the person you want to commit to psychiatric help, lives. Ask the clerk of court for the right papers and application papers. Fill those out.
  • Attend the hearing. If there is not a reason for immediate involuntary commitment a hearing will because the judge will make the final decision based on the evidence. Once all the papers are filed you will have little say in what happens to the person you are trying to get psychiatric help for. You may be asked to testify in the hearing as well.
  • Be prepared for problems. The person you are trying to get psychiatric help for may be very upset with being placed in a mental institution. If the person you are trying to get psychiatric help doesn’t immediately get into the mental institution and you feel like you are in danger then have a restraining order put in place. If they violate that you can then call the police and have the mental health professionals act enforced.

For voluntary psychiatric help

Psychiatric help can come in the form of inpatient treatment in a mental health facility, outpatient programs and/or groups with a therapist. The hardest parts about getting someone psychiatric help is convincing the person that they need help. Many times individuals do not feel that they need help, are aggressively against the idea or some are incapable of understanding what is going on.

Either way, if you are trying to get someone psychiatric help make sure that you:

  • Tell them that you love them and support them.
  • Educate yourself on their illness.
  • Drive them to appointments.
  • Find them psychiatric help.
  • Make sure they have their medications.
  • Make sure they are talking to their doctor and/or therapist.
  • Make sure they are doing ok.
  • Offer to help them where and when you can.

And last but not least if you are looking to get psychiatric help for someone else you must also get help for yourself. It’s hard to be there for a sick person and remain level headed. It can stress you out and be very hard on you – emotionally, physically, financially, socially, etc.

If your loved one is in need of alcohol or drug addiction treatment please give us a call at 800-951-6135.

Source: http://www.healthyplace.com/blogs/breakingbipolar/2011/03/how-to-help-someone-with-a-mental-illness/

 

How Do I Find Addiction Treatment Facilities in FL That Work with the Marchman Act?

Treatment Facilities in FL That Work With a Marchman Act

Treatment Facilities in FL That Work With a Marchman Act

 

The Marchman Act is a way for the law and the loved one’s of someone struggling with addiction to be able to help someone who cannot help themselves. A Marchman Act is a means of providing an individual in need of drug treatment, drug alcohol detox, or a medical/mental facility with emergency services and temporary detention for substance abuse evaluation and treatment when required either on an involuntary or voluntary basis.

There are many addiction treatment facilities in FL that work with the Marchman Act. In voluntary type Marchman Act, the person who needs drug treatment applies to the facility to undergo observation and treatment. There needs to be evident that the person is in need of substance abuse treatment and poses a danger to themselves, their family or the community. To admit someone to addiction treatment facilities in FL on an involuntary basis, there needs to be evidence that the person has lost the power of control with regards to substance abuse and either 1.) has inflicted or threatened to inflict bodily harm to themselves or others OR 2.) has lost the ability to make a rational decision about addiction treatment due to substance abuse.

If someone is voluntarily going to an addiction treatment facility in FL that works with the Marchman Act, they will need to apply directly to the facility. Addiction treatment facilities in FL that work with the Marchman Act for involuntary admissions have different criteria than those that accept voluntary admissions. Almost all drug treatment facilities are able to accept people under the voluntary provision of the Marchman Act.

 If you are trying to get someone into treatment on an involuntary basis, the first step in finding addiction treatment facilities in FL that work with the Marchman Act is filing the petition with the court. A private practitioner, the persons spouse or relative of the person, the director of a licensed service provider or the directors designee, 3 responsible adults who have personal knowledge of the persons substance abuse problem or, in the case of a minor, the minor’s parents, legal guardian, legal custodian, or a licensed service provider can file an involuntary Marchman Act petition. If a judge decides that your loved one may need one of the addiction treatment facilities in Florida that works with the Marchman Act, they will be able to provide a list of state-approved facilities.  Also, a list of addiction treatment facilities in FL that work with the Marchman Act can be found by contacting the Department of Children and Families (DCF)

Addiction facilities that in FL that work with the Marchman Act include hospitals, detoxes, and addiction receiving facilities (ARF). An ARF is a state-contracted facility that has been designated as secure and able to handle aggressive behavior and deter departures of people who are admitted involuntarily under the Marchman Act.

If you or someone you know needs drug or alcohol treatment or is looking for addiction treatment facilities that work with the Marchman Act, call us at (877) 711-HOPE (4673) or visit us online at www.palmpartners.com.

Source:

http://www.dcf.state.fl.us/programs/samh/SubstanceAbuse/marchman/index.shtml

How Can I Use the Marchman Act to Help My Loved One Struggling with Addiction?

How can I use the Marchman Act to help my loved one struggling with addiction

How can I use the Marchman Act to help my loved one?

The Marchman Act is a way for family and loved one’s to help someone, struggling with addiction, who cannot help themselves. A Marchman Act is a legal means of providing an individual in need of drug treatment, drug alcohol detox, or a medical/mental facility with emergency services and temporary detention for substance abuse evaluation and treatment when required either on an involuntary or voluntary basis.

How can I use the Marchman Act to help my loved one who’s struggling with addiction?

It is very easy for the person struggling with addiction to find multiple reasons why they don’t want or need to go to treatment; it is also easy for that person to lose the mental capacity to make healthy decisions for themselves even if it means they may die; that’s where the Marchman Act comes into play. The Marchman Act helps your loved one receive emergency treatment whether they want substance abuse treatment for their addiction or not. Regardless if the loved one struggling with addiction think they need substance abuse the Marchman Act allows the family and friends to find help for that person and make sure they utilize it. The Marchman Act is legal process that consists of different steps but it is easily utilized when someone is in desperate need of drug treatment, drug alcohol detox, or a medical/mental facility. The Marchman Act is meant to help your loved one struggling with addiction.

How does the Marchman Act work?

An involuntary admission through use of the Marchman act to help your loved one struggling with addiction can be one of the greatest gifts you ever give them even if they don’t see it initially. An involuntary admission is when there is good faith and reason to believe the person is substance abuse impaired and, because of said impairment, has lost the power of self-control over their substance use; either has inflicted, attempted or threatened to inflict or is likely to inflict physical harm on himself or herself or another person; or the persons judgment has been so impaired because of substance abuse that he/she is incapable of appreciating the need for substance abuse treatment. After a Marchman act has been put in place it will be used to help your loved one through the legal process that goes along with it.

Who has permission to enforce a Marchman Act?

A law enforcement officer may also take your loved one into protective custody until your loved one appears to meet the admission criteria and is brought to the attention of law enforcement officer in a public place. A law enforcement officer has the authority to implement the Marchman Act or protective custody. Also a private practitioner, the persons spouse or relative of the person, the director of a licensed service provider or the directors designee, 3 responsible adults who have personal knowledge of the persons substance abuse problem or, in the case of a minor, the minor’s parents, legal guardian, legal custodian, or a licensed service provider can file an involuntary Marchman Act petition.

If you have personal knowledge of a person’s substance abuse problem and because of this impairment the person has lost the power of self-control with respect to substance abuse, drinking and drugging; and you have reason to believe that that person is a danger to him/herself or others you may file a Marchman Act petition which you can use to help your loved one struggling with addiction. If you’d like to know how Palm Partners can help you in the process of a Marchman Act for your loved one please give our 24-hour crisis counselors a call at 800-951-6135.

 

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