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Safe, effective drug/alcohol treatment

All across this country in small towns, rural areas and cities, alcoholism and drug abuse are destroying the lives of men, women and their families. Where to turn for help? What to do when friends, dignity and perhaps employment are lost?

The answer is Palm Partners Recovery Center. It’s a proven path to getting sober and staying sober.

Palm Partners’ innovative and consistently successful treatment includes: a focus on holistic health, a multi-disciplinary approach, a 12-step recovery program and customized aftercare. Depend on us for help with:

The Americans with Disabilities Act Helps Addicts Who Need Treatment

The Americans with Disabilities Act Helps Addicts Who Need Treatment

(This content is being used for illustrative purposes only; any person depicted in the content is a model)

Author: Justin Mckibben

The vast majority of people struggling with addiction are actually employed. In fact, too many people actually never try to get help for their addiction because they think that having a job means they are not that far gone. However, being a ‘functioning addict’ does not make you any less addicted. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) actually noted some time ago that 76% of people with substance abuse problems are employed. Unfortunately, too many of them also avoid getting treatment because they fear doing so could actually hurt their careers.

What many may not realize is how things like the Americans with Disabilities Act helps addicts with treatment by protecting them from discrimination.

What Is the Americans with Disabilities Act?

The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, commonly referred to as the ADA, is a civil rights law prohibiting discrimination based on disability. It protects individuals with disabilities and guarantees equal opportunity for individuals with disabilities in:

  • Public accommodations
  • Employment
  • Transportation
  • State and local government services
  • Telecommunications

People with disabilities deserve the same rights and opportunities as everyone else, and the ADA is designed to ensure they have them.

One thing that makes the ADA so important is that it requires covered employers to provide reasonable accommodations to employees with disabilities, and imposes accessibility requirements on public accommodations.

How Does ADA Define Disability?

To be clear, employees undergoing treatment for drug or alcohol addiction have always been covered under the ADA. The ADA defines a disability as:

A physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, a history of having such an impairment, or being regarded as having such an impairment.

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) was charged with interpreting the 1990 law, and ended up EEOC developing regulations limiting an individual’s impairment to one that “severely or significantly restricts” a major life activity.

Later on the ADAAA directed the EEOC to amend this regulation and replace “severely or significantly” with “substantially limits”.

The ADA added a few extra As around 18 years later.

In 2008, the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act (ADAAA) was signed into law and became effective on January 1, 2009. The implementation of the ADAAA made a number of significant changes to the definition of disability. The ADAAA also added to the ADA examples of “major life activities” including, but not limited to:

  • Caring for oneself
  • Performing manual tasks
  • Seeing
  • Hearing
  • Eating
  • Sleeping
  • Walking
  • Standing
  • Lifting
  • Bending
  • Speaking
  • Breathing
  • Learning
  • Reading
  • Concentrating
  • Thinking
  • Communicating
  • Working

They also included the operation of several specified major bodily functions. If we look at all of these criteria, it is not that surprising that alcoholism and drug addiction would qualify.

How Does Americans with Disabilities Act Help Addicts?

Addiction stigma is one of the hardest hurdles for most people to have to overcome when trying to find addiction treatment. A lot of people never even seek out the help because they are afraid their job or career would be jeopardized. But the ADA helps alcoholics and addicts by protecting them.

  • ADA and Alcoholics

According to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s (EEOC’s) Technical Assistance Manual: Title I of the ADA,

“A person who currently uses alcohol is not automatically denied protection simply because of the alcohol use. An alcoholic is a person with a disability under the ADA and may be entitled to consideration of accommodation, if s/he is qualified to perform the essential functions of a job. However, an employer may discipline, discharge or deny employment to an alcoholic whose use of alcohol adversely affects job performance or conduct to the extent that s/he is not ‘qualified.’ ”

While ADA regulations may permit allowances for alcoholism, illegal drug use is never protected. However, addicts who are recovering are protected under the ADA.

  • ADA and Addicts

According to the EEOC’s manual:

“Persons addicted to drugs, but who are no longer using drugs illegally and are receiving treatment for drug addiction or who have been rehabilitated successfully, are protected by the ADA from discrimination on the basis of past drug addiction.”

So if you were to take a drug test and it shows that you are using an illicit substance you disqualify yourself from ADA protections.

How it Helps with Treatment

Fear of losing a job or sabotaging your financial future is a huge obstacle for most people who desperately need addiction treatment but are afraid to ask for help. Too many people think they will be black-listed or discriminated against for their struggles with drugs or alcohol. Breaking the stigma is essential to helping more people recover.

The ADA helps by treating alcoholics and addicts like people suffering from an illness or disability instead of punishing them. It protects your right to get help, as long as you don’t violate the policies of your profession. Therefore, it doesn’t necessarily protect people actively using drugs or alcohol. You can still face the consequences that come with it despite the ADA protections.

If you are attending a rehabilitation program, or you have successfully completed a program of rehabilitation, you are covered under the ADA. To find out more about these and other protections, look into the opportunities you are eligible for with the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA) offered through your company.

Discrimination is always wrong, and discrimination against people recovering from substance use disorder is no different. People who suffer from drug or alcohol addiction need to be supported, especially when it comes to maintaining the aspects of their life that help them build a future. Know your rights and be aware of the protections in place so that you don’t put it off until it is too late. If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free now.

CALL NOW 1-800-951-6135

Drug Rehab in Florida for Professionals

Drug Rehab in Florida for Professionals

(This content is being used for illustrative purposes only; any person depicted in the content is a model)

Author: Justin Mckibben

Sometimes people are looking for drug rehab in Florida for professionals, specifically because they are active in their careers and want to be assured that not only are they able to commit to their recovery, but also that they’re able to work with their professional schedule or responsibilities around their time in treatment. Professionals are at risk of addiction too.

Being confident about anonymity being kept during and after treatment is another priority. Drug and alcohol treatment for employees is available when someone takes medical leave or uses vacation time to maintain their job while getting the help they need, and there are plenty of aspects of drug rehab in Florida for professionals that can be especially effective in helping the career individual keep up while making a change.

Drug Rehab in Florida for Professionals: HIPPA

First things first, let us talk about privacy. Most adults with a professional career want to be sure that during a time where they are dealing with an issue involving drugs or alcohol that they are being cared for in an environment that respects their right to privacy. Many professionals are familiar with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA), which is a regulation designed to protect personal information and data collected and stored in medical records.

HIPPA has established a national standard to be used in all doctors’ offices, hospitals and other businesses where personal medical information is stored, and is specifically designed to protect any personal medical information. Of course any drug rehab in Florida for professionals will be a HIPPA compliant business, and any individual can be assured that their privacy is protected.

Drug Rehab in Florida for Professionals: FMLA

Employers are responsible for providing access to drug and alcohol treatment to their employees, with legislations and regulations to protect patients such as the FMLA (Family Medical Leave Act) to protect the rights of individuals with careers seeking drug rehab in Florida for professionals.

The FMLA entitles eligible employees of covered employers to take unpaid, job-protected leave for specified family and medical reasons with continuation of group health insurance coverage under the same terms and conditions as if the employee had not taken leave. When looking for drug rehab in Florida for professionals you have several options as long as you’re eligible. If so, you are entitled to 12 workweeks of leave in a 12-month period for:

  • The birth of a child and to care for the newborn child within one year of birth;
  • The placement with the employee of a child for adoption or foster care and to care for the newly placed child within one year of placement;
  • To care for the employee’s spouse, child, or parent who has a serious health condition;
  • A serious health condition that makes the employee unable to perform the essential functions of his or her job;
  • Any qualifying exigency arising out of the fact that the employee’s spouse, son, daughter, or parent is a covered military member on “covered active duty;” or

Or even 26 workweeks of leave during a single 12-month period to care for a covered service member with a serious injury or illness if the eligible employee is the service member’s spouse, son, daughter, parent, or next of kin.

Drug Rehab in Florida for Professionals: Accessible Admission

All it takes to find a drug rehab in Florida for professionals is a call to our facility. Our professionals can assist you with the entire process of enrollment into a drug rehab in Florida for professionals. The Palm Healthcare staff is familiar with all aspects of enrollment, from verifying insurance benefits to identifying an appropriate treatment program, to choosing a program for ongoing follow-up aftercare drug and alcohol treatment for employees, such as an intensive outpatient program (IOP).

  • We are able to verify insurance benefits within 2 hours of your call
  • We can often facilitate your employee’s program admission within 24 hours
  • We handle the research, paperwork, and all logistics involved in the process
  • We make it easy so that there are no hiccups in the process

At Palm Healthcare, we strive to remove the obstacles and barriers that limit access to treatment so that your employees, members, and their loved ones can find the treatment program that best suits their needs.

Drug Rehab in Florida for Professionals: Assistance Programs

Along with FMLA there are other assistance programs that are available to help people seeking drug and alcohol treatment for employees such as:

  • EAP (Employee Assistance Program) work-based intervention program designed to identify and assist employees in resolving personal problems (e.g., marital, financial or emotional problems; family issues; substance/alcohol abuse)
  • MAP (Member Assistance Program) Help Union members and their families with personal and work-related concerns. Implementing and promoting a MAP provides early intervention and helps members balance work responsibilities and their personal lives.
  • LAP (Labor Assistance Professionals) dedicated to obtaining comprehensive drug and alcohol treatment for employees, and all other mental health services for our members at a reasonable and fair price, while advocating for member assistance program development within labor and for recognition of the key role labor plays from the fields’ professional organization and by its treatment providers.

Palm Healthcare offers assistance to employers and their employees when it comes to initiating the treatment process. Our addiction specialists and case managers are just one part of a compassionated staff thoroughly trained to navigate the process so that employees seeking drug rehab in Florida for professionals   can do so easily and seamlessly.

Addiction does not discriminate, it does not target the unemployed. Plenty of professionals experience serious issues with substance abuse, even CEO’s and CFO’s need help sometimes. Drugs and alcohol can destroy the careers we spend out lives building, but there is drug and alcohol treatment available for professionals. If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free 1-800-951-6135

 

Drug and Alcohol Treatment for Professionals

Drug and Alcohol Treatment for Professionals

Author: Justin Mckibben

Sometimes people are looking for drug and alcohol treatment for professionals because they have active careers that they wish to keep, and want to be assured that not only are they able to work their schedule or responsibilities around their time in treatment, but to be sure that their anonymity will be kept once they have entered into treatment. Drug and alcohol treatment for employees is available when someone takes medical leave or uses vacation time to maintain their job while getting the help they need.

Drug and Alcohol Treatment for Professionals: FMLA

With legislations and regulations to protect patients such as the FMLA (Family Medical Leave Act) employers are responsible for providing access to drug and alcohol treatment to their employees. The FMLA entitles eligible employees of covered employers to take unpaid, job-protected leave for specified family and medical reasons with continuation of group health insurance coverage under the same terms and conditions as if the employee had not taken leave. Those employees looking for drug and alcohol treatment for professionals have several options as long as they are eligible. If so, employees are entitled to 12 workweeks of leave in a 12-month period for:

  • The birth of a child and to care for the newborn child within one year of birth;
  • The placement with the employee of a child for adoption or foster care and to care for the newly placed child within one year of placement;
  • To care for the employee’s spouse, child, or parent who has a serious health condition;
  • A serious health condition that makes the employee unable to perform the essential functions of his or her job;
  • Any qualifying exigency arising out of the fact that the employee’s spouse, son, daughter, or parent is a covered military member on “covered active duty;” or

Or even 26 workweeks of leave during a single 12-month period to care for a covered service member with a serious injury or illness if the eligible employee is the service member’s spouse, son, daughter, parent, or next of kin.

Drug and Alcohol Treatment for Professionals: Other Assistance Programs

Along with FMLA there are other assistance programs that are available to help people seeking drug and alcohol treatment for employees such as:

  • EAP (Employee Assistance Program)

work-based intervention program designed to identify and assist employees in resolving personal problems (e.g., marital, financial or emotional problems; family issues; substance/alcohol abuse)

  • MAP (Member Assistance Program)

Help Union members and their families with personal and work-related concerns. Implementing and promoting a MAP provides early intervention and helps members balance work responsibilities and their personal lives.

  • LAP (Labor Assistance Professionals)

dedicated to obtaining comprehensive drug and alcohol treatment for employees, and all other mental health services for our members at a reasonable and fair price, while advocating for member assistance program development within labor and for recognition of the key role labor plays from the fields’ professional organization and by its treatment providers.

These programs are very beneficial to the individual looking for drug and alcohol treatment for professionals or drug and alcohol treatment for employees, but it can be an involved process that adds strain and stress to your already-busy Human Resources Department.

But Palm Healthcare offers assistance to employers and their employees when it comes to initiating the treatment process. Our Addiction Specialists and Case Managers are just one part of a compassionated staff thoroughly trained to navigate the process so that employees seeking drug and alcohol treatment for professionals can do so easily and seamlessly.

Drug and Alcohol Treatment for Professionals: Accessible Admission

With just one phone call to our facility, our professionals can assist with the entire process of enrollment into drug and alcohol treatment for professionals. The Palm Healthcare staff is familiar with all aspects of enrollment, from verifying insurance benefits to identifying an appropriate treatment program, to choosing a program for ongoing follow-up aftercare drug and alcohol treatment for employees, such as an intensive outpatient program (IOP).

  • We are able to verify insurance benefits within 2 hours of your call
  • We can often facilitate your employee’s program admission within 24 hours
  • We handle the research, paperwork, and all logistics involved in the process
  • We make it easy so that there are no hiccups in the process

At Palm Healthcare, we strive to remove the obstacles and barriers that limit access to treatment so that your employees, members, and their loved ones can find the treatment program that best suits their needs.

Drug and Alcohol Treatment for Professionals: HIPPA

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA) is regulation designed to protect personal information and data collected and stored in medical records. HIPPA has established a national standard to be used in all doctors’ offices, hospitals and other businesses where personal medical information is stored. HIPPA protects personal medical information, and being a HIPPA compliant business any individual seeking drug and alcohol treatment for professionals can be assured that their privacy is protected.

Addiction is not specific to the unemployed, plenty of people who have serious issues with substance abuse have jobs or careers they have worked a life-time for, even businessmen and CEO’s need help sometimes. Drugs and alcohol are dangerous and do not discriminate, but there is drug and alcohol treatment available for professionals. If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free 1-800-951-6135

 

11 Top Reasons for Not Seeking Drug Abuse Treatment

11 Top Reasons for Not Seeking Drug Abuse Treatment

There are many reasons why people put off getting help for their drug abuse issues. Much of what it boils down to is fear. However, there are some specific fears as well as other reasons that keep people from seeking help for their substance abuse or addiction issues. Here are the 11 top reasons for not seeking drug abuse treatment:

#1. Fear of change/of the unknown

One of the main reasons that keep people from seeking drug abuse treatment is the fear of change and of the unknown. This is a common fear that everyone experiences in their daily lives, not just those who struggle with addiction. For those who do, it is the fear of not knowing what to expect from treatment as well as fearing the whole lifestyle change – one in which they’re not depending on drugs to function daily.

#2. Fear of withdrawal symptoms

Research shows that the fear of drug withdrawal is one of the main reasons that deters people from seeking drug abuse treatment. If you’ve ever tried to quit drinking or using drugs, then you know quite well what it feels like to go through withdrawal. The good news is that drug abuse treatment, such as inpatient rehab, offers a medical detox, which is a program that tapers you down with the use of medication in order to keep you comfortable and safe through the process.

#3. Unwilling to leave behind a beloved pet

If you’re not an animal lover, this one might sound silly. However, there are a lot of people that use their pet as an excuse to put off getting help. Our furry companions offer us unconditional love and comfort and it’s difficult to leave them for any amount of time, no matter how temporary. But, in order to be their best human possible, it’s necessary to get the help you need first.

#4. Fear of failure

The idea of living a life without the use of alcohol and other drugs can be a daunting one for those of us who have gotten used to drinking and using on a daily basis just to feel normal and to function. Like many others regarding typical new tasks, like taking on a new job, going to rehab and making long-lasting changes can evoke a fear of failure at accomplishing these things.

#5. Fear of losing their job

If you receive health insurance through your job, you are covered by a law known as the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA). This allows you to take medical leave – for reasons including seeking drug abuse treatment – without losing your job. And again, you do not have to divulge the reason for which you are taking medical leave; it’s confidential.

If this is not the case, you might be surprised at just how understanding employers can be if you go to them in private and tell them you are struggling with this problem. I have heard several people’s stories in which their bosses told them to get help. In fact, as many as 1 in 3 people are affected by addiction and so, chances are that your boss might be in recovery or they might have a loved one in recovery.

#6. Fear of losing custody of their children

This is a very real situation for many people who struggle with substance abuse and addiction. Again, there’s good news. More and more judges have begun to understand the nature of addiction and have become more compassionate to those who struggle. They are often willing to reserve judgment while you go and get help for your substance abuse.

#7. Financial reasons (need to be around to pay the bills)

This, too, is a very real situation for many. The best way to overcome this obstacle to seeking substance abuse treatment is to understand your priorities and that you and your health and well-being must come first. Think about all the ways you got out of a tight spot in your addiction, whether it was finding ways to pay for drugs when you were flat broke, or maybe it was getting out of a dangerous situation with a nefarious drug dealer. Put that kind of resourceful problem-solving into figuring out how you will handle financial obligations while in rehab. Where there’s a will, there’s a way.

#8. A belief that they have to hold the family/business together

Many people who put off seeking drug abuse treatment do so because they have this inflated sense of self and responsibility. I hear people use the excuse that they can’t go to rehab because they are the only one who can hold down the business and/or keep the family running.

The fact of the matter is, you can’t be the best spouse/parent/boss/employee while you are struggling with a drug addiction; it’s impossible. Although you might think you are doing a pretty damn good job, that’s probably not the reality of the situation. Putting yourself first for once and getting the help you need so that you can heal and function at 100% is the only way you can guarantee that you are holding it down back home.

#9. Stigma

Unfortunately, there is still a rather negative stigma attached to drug addiction and drug abuse treatment, much like that of having a mental health disorder. There are two things to keep in mind here. One, attitudes and beliefs are changing as more and more research and information about the disease of addiction surfaces and two, seeking drug abuse treatment is your business, alone. There is federal legislation that requires this information, like any other private medical information, to be kept confidential. No one will know you are in rehab except for the people that you tell.

#10. Denial

Some people simply don’t believe they have a problem or they think that they’re still having too good of a time drinking and using to go and get help. The fact of the matter is, if you’re loved ones are concerned, or if your health is failing, or if you are seeing negative consequences as a result of your substance use/abuse, you have a real problem and you need help.

#11. Concern about being able to pay for it

Substance abuse treatment can be expensive but they are ways to handle this reason for not seeking drug abuse treatment. If you have health insurance through your employer, your plan most likely covers rehab as well as offers short term disability (and long term if you opted for it), which means you will continue to get paid even while away from your job.

If you have Obamacare, there are ever-expanding plans that cover treatment for substance abuse and addiction.

If neither of these applies, you can always pay out-of-pocket and perhaps family members can help. Lastly, there are state-funded programs for those without health insurance and who are unable to afford the cost of treatment.

Whatever your reason or reasons for not seeking drug abuse treatment, it’s time to get your priorities straight. You must be willing to put yourself first for once by getting help and getting better. Once you get help, you’ll realize that you were making your life so much harder by continuing to abuse substances rather than getting help. Substance abuse treatment is the best gift you can give yourself. Call us toll-free at 1-800-951-6135 to speak with an Addiction Specialist. We are here to help.

Can I Make Someone Go to Rehab?

Can I Make Someone Go to Rehab?

Can I make someone go to rehab? Try talking to them

You can try talking to your loved one about getting help by going to rehab for substance abuse and addiction. Here are some tips on how to talk to your loved one about this very sensitive subject.

First of all, take a matter-of-fact tack. Simply state what you know happened, rather than asking loaded questions and encouraging lying, only to call them out on it after you get them to produce some kind of answer. Use language that reflects how you see things, such as “I feel,” and “I think” being careful not to start statements with “You” as it sounds accusatory.

Don’t blame yourself or your loved one for their addiction. Also, don’t take anything your loved one says personally. It really isn’t about you.

Be sure to provide information that might influence your loved one in making the decision themselves, rather than trying to convince them to change. Focusing on how things will improve your loved one makes changes, rather than how things will be worse if they don’t is also effective when talking to someone about their addition.

Can I make someone go to rehab? Family pressure

First, of all, the idea of going into treatment is often a frightening one. Your loved one might be more open to the idea if you do the research for them because they are already feeling overwhelmed. Look into treatment programs and rehabs that are covered by their insurance. Gather brochures, literature, information from their websites, and contact phone numbers.

One of the main fears of going to rehab is that of job loss. The good news is that there is legislation that protects many people’s jobs when they go to get help for substance abuse and addiction. Get information related to HIPAA and FMLA and present it to your family member or loved one who struggles. It will outline how both their job and privacy are protected by these laws.

Appeal to their emotions by letting them know you fully support their decision to get help and build up their self-esteem with affirmations about them that don’t have to do with their addiction, instead of dwelling on all the negative ways in which it’s affecting them.

Talk to them in a non-confrontational, non-judgmental manner and in a private setting. Another suggestion is to write them a letter and either sit with them as they read it or allow them to read it on their own. Putting your feelings on paper is the best way to get your point across without tempers running high, which can happen in a face-to-face situation; having an emotionally-charged conversation with someone who is likely to become defensive and even angry will more than likely turn into a screaming match. By writing it down, you can get out everything you need to without being interrupted and without things escalating into a heated argument in which both sides so things they really don’t mean.

Can I make someone go to rehab? Tough Love

Some may disagree with the ‘tough love’ approach but, it’s important to know what enabling is and how to set limits and boundaries with a loved one who is using. This usually means cutting off any financial support you have been giving them and all other means of support, such as helping out with rides, paying bills, and basically bailing them out any time they’re in a jam. Saying ‘no’ and sticking to your guns is important. Otherwise, you run the risk of enabling them and essentially supporting their drug habit, either directly or indirectly.

Can I make someone go to rehab? 5150 hold

The 5150 hold allows someone to be held up to 72 hours against their will. A 5150 is not supposed to be used to hold a person who has been reported by anyone other than a qualified officer or clinician. That is, in order to use this option, you would have to get the authorities involved. There is no guarantee that your loved one will stay in the facility. The request merely gets them in the door of the facility and, depending on the assessment performed by staff, your loved one might be kept for up to 72 hours.

Can I make someone go to rehab? Get support

If you need support with learning how to support your loved one and getting them to get help for their addiction, there are several things you can do.

Support groups such as Al-Anon (an AA spin-off for the family and friends of alcoholics), Nar-Anon (for the family members of narcotics abusers), Family Anonymous, or Alateen (geared toward teenagers and preteens) exist specifically to support the loved ones of those who struggle with substance abuse and addiction. These groups are free and open to the public. These, like AA and NA are fellowship groups can help you better understand your loved one’s addiction as well as ways to cope. You will learn and understand that you aren’t responsible for their substance abuse and that you can’t force them to stop. These groups also can teach you effective ways to cope as your friend or family member faces the consequences of addiction and how to talk about addiction with them.

Another option is to arrange an intervention, which is a meeting or confrontation between the loved ones of the addict and the addict. By confronting your loved one and being able to talk about addiction with them, including the consequences of the addiction, an intervention is geared toward popping their bubble of denial as well as finally acknowledging the ways in which their behavior is destroying their relationships as well as their own life. Finally, the goal of the intervention is to get your loved one to agree to seek treatment.

Be aware, however, that interventions can be drag up all kinds of painful memories and accusations. Also, it’s important to know that this approach doesn’t always work and may even backfire, by alienating your loved one from their support system – their concerned loved ones. This can result in pushing them away from the idea of getting help.

If you need support and have questions, you can call 1-800-951-6135 to speak with an Addiction Specialist around the clock. If you’re wrestling with the idea of “can I make someone go to rehab?” speaking with a specialist can help you with ways to address the situation with your loved one.

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