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Drug Addicted Men in Treatment Turn to Crossfit

 

Drug Addicted Men in Treatment Turn to Crossfit

(This content is being used for illustrative purposes only; any person depicted in the content is a model)

By now, we know how beneficial exercise can be to our health. Exercise can be an excellent alternative to drug addiction because exercise relieves stress and reduces the chance of a relapse. Now, drug addicted men are turning to the popular fitness program Crossfit to help them in their recovery process.

Whether you are addicted to drugs, alcohol, sex, or any other addiction, you understand how your addiction can help you temporarily escape the stresses of daily life. Fortunately, exercise releases the same chemicals in the brain, like dopamine, that help with increasing mood and reducing stress. It can be very helpful to establish a routine exercise pattern to help heal the mind and body from dependency on drugs

Furthermore, the Charlotte Rescue Mission out of North Carolina, is setting a new approach to drug addiction recovery by incorporating Crossfit exercise for more than 100 men in addiction recovery. The Mission is a treatment program that brings in people with drug and alcohol addictions for a 90-day treatment program.

The Mission brings addicts into their in-house program for free and helps them get on the path to recovery. Just recently, intense exercise was added as another element to the healing process.  Crossfit instructors volunteer their time to help the men in recovery.

“Just to instill this idea that proper movement is going to help you feel better,” Michelle Crawford said.

Michelle Crawford is one of many instructors donating their time to teach CrossFit classes to men at the Mission each day.  The Mission has been around for over 70 years but only recently have they implemented such an intense exercise regimen into their program. More than a dozen gyms got together and donated equipment to fill a full-size gym at the Mission.

Those who run the facility insist that the exercise program is helping men recover from the physical pain their drug and alcohol abuse has done to their bodies.

“I think it give them some confidence in their physical abilities, some of which they’ve neglected over the years,” Charlotte Rescue Mission’s John Snider said.

Fighting Drug Addiction With Exercise

This is not the first time exercise was considered to be an excellent treatment for drug addiction. Scientists have done extensive research to understand the relationship between drug addiction and exercise. Exercise, as we all know, gives us endorphins which in turn, make you a much happier person. By replacing the endorphins released from drugs with exercise, addicts have a much lower desire to return to their addiction.

Over the past decade, Crossfit has become a huge fitness craze. Everyone is doing it.  Soon, rehab facilities started to pay attention to the program and many, like Mission in North Carolina, have implemented similar intensive exercise programs as part of their treatment plan.

In a 2012 study, researchers examined the impact of running on neuro-biological rewards and it garnered positive results. However, not everyone enjoys running and Crossfit is a great way of incorporating repetitive exercises in an exciting way. Crossfit allows addicts to strive for a goal. Invitational meets are held for the chance to compete in CrossFit Games which is an exercise version of the Olympics. The program airs on television on a yearly basis.

The numbers are in and it reveals that exercise greatly benefits those recovering from addiction. Still, one must remember to use exercise in a healthy way. It is possible that exercise can become just as addictive as drugs. However, when used in moderation, exercise can be the stepping stone to a healthy life after sobriety. If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free 1-800-951-6135.

Update: Scientology Rehab Center Denied in Maryland

Update: Scientology Rehab Center Denied in Maryland

Author: Justin Mckibben

This story began just over a year ago when the Church of Scientology bought the plot of land for just over $4 million before announcing the intentions of opening a rehab center on the property. Residents in the area began rallying against these efforts, but the church persisted in its efforts, and actually came pretty close to crossing the finish line. Unfortunately, it was not close enough to get what they wanted, but maybe Maryland thinks it’s too close for comfort.

The Build Up

Narconon has so far been failing in the fight for the goal of establishing a few “Narconon residential drug rehabilitation centers”, including recently one location Maryland at Tout Run, a pristine 40-acre camp in Frederick County which has in the past been visited by numerous presidents including Herbert Hoover, Franklin Roosevelt, and Dwight Eisenhower, merely miles away from Camp David.

As covered in a previous article, the Church of Scientology has been criticized in the past for the various extensions of the church manipulating circumstances to achieve their ends. The church’s real estate arm and Narconon were able to get every other approval permit that was required to build the rehab, except needing the property to be designated for historic preservation, which would allow them to make changes otherwise banned by zoning laws.

Many local council members expressed concerns and skepticism about Scientology and their plans for the area, including at the time one member of the council who pointed out the power-play by the real estate extension of the church, claiming Narconon was “going through the back end” to get the appropriate licensing for the center, leading residents to regard the organization as dishonest.

Frederick County council had originally decided to postpone the decision until April 21 to allow for more public consideration, and just this Tuesday the council members voted to deny the proposal.

Stage of Denial

The vote cast by the Frederick County Council was pretty one sided, with an almost unanimous 6-1 tally against allowing the church to open the drug rehab facility on the premises.

The one council member who voted in favor of allowing the rehab to be built was Billy Shreve, and he was quoted by local news as stating:

“This application has been clouded because the record does reflect that there was testimony based on Narconon and Scientology. So I think that has clouded our decision a few times, and has led us to probably go a lot further into this decision than it really merited.”

Maryland local Mark Long, an opponent of the Narconon facility being established in the community stated,

“Having a 6 to 1 vote it does show some precedence that the public doesn’t want this here. I mean, to get that vote across party lines is pretty significant. I hope they understand that it’s best just to go home and give up on this.”

However, according to news reports Narconon officials said they may take the matter to court, and that they have not decided exactly what action they plan to take but that the fight is not over and they are “not going away.” So will a second run at this provide them with a different result?

This is definitely not the first time that the Church of Scientology has been shunned by a community for trying to build a treatment center, nor is it the first time they have been accused of using shady or under-handed tactics to try and get their way.

In February there was a story of the church trying to establish a similar compound in Milton, Canada that was met with resistance, and ultimately had a hearing set for March to April to further rule on the case.

Since the center wouldn’t use over-the-counter drugs to treat addiction, it’s not required to obtain a license from the Province to do so. According to company representative Rubina Qureshi,

“And, therefore we were put in a position of having to ask for a minor variance (of zoning bylaw) to clarify that a private drug and alcohol rehabilitation centre conforms with the Town’s definition of a group home,”

But Barbara Koopmans, the Town’s Planning Director, stated the application for a minor variance was denied because it did not conform with the ‘group home type 2’ definition under which the company applied. Many in Milton were vocal about their opposition, but Scientology officials remain persistent.

Should these communities open their arms to these centers? Or should they be concerned considering the controversy surrounding the Narconon methods and the tragic deaths of some patients under sketchy circumstances?

While some treatment centers have a tough time getting off the ground thanks to questionable methods and a bad rep, some people avoid treatment thinking they are all the same, but this is NOT the case. Palm Partners is a certified and celebrated holistic healing center for those suffering from alcohol or drug addiction, and our skilled and professional staff members want to help. If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free 1-800-951-6135

What to Expect from Drug and Alcohol Treatment

What to Expect from Drug and Alcohol Treatment

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What to Expect from Drug and Alcohol Treatment: How It Works

A drug and alcohol treatment facility or program is a medical and residential program that specializes in helping you get off drugs and alcohol. A medical staff monitors you and administers medicine to alleviate your withdrawal symptoms so that your detox and recovery are safe and comfortable.

What to Expect from Drug and Alcohol Treatment: Alcohol Detox

If you are dependent on alcohol, you will require the help that a drug and alcohol treatment program can offer. It’s not safe to go “cold turkey,” suddenly stopping your drinking. The staff at the drug and alcohol treatment facility is trained to help and administer certain medications in order to ease your withdrawal symptoms.

Alcohol withdrawal syndrome is a medical condition that results when you stop drinking once you are physically dependent on alcohol. The withdrawal symptoms from alcohol dependence can range in severity, from mild such as insomnia and anxiety to severe and life-threatening, such as convulsions, which can lead to death. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome can cause seizures, delirium tremens, also known as “the shakes,” anxiety, panic attacks, and paranoia.

What to Expect from Drug and Alcohol Treatment: Drug Detox

The withdrawal symptoms from alcohol and other drugs can be extremely uncomfortable, even painful, psychologically disturbing and can result in death. So much so that, many people in your situation say that the biggest obstacle to their recovery is their fear of withdrawal symptoms. The staff at the drug and alcohol treatment facility can address your withdrawal symptoms from a number of different drugs, not just alcohol.

If you are using opiates, such as the prescription painkillers oxycodone, hydrocodone, methadone or heroin, the withdrawals aren’t life-threatening however, in some cases, people have experienced seizures when they stopped on their own. Alcohol and drug treatment programs can help alleviate your withdrawal symptoms and you will be able to manage them much more comfortably.

If you are dependent on benzos, such as Xanax or Valium, or barbiturates then a medical drug detox is necessary. Just like with alcohol withdrawal syndrome, benzo withdrawal syndrome is potentially fatal. Severe symptoms are seizure, heart failure, stroke, coma, and death.

If you are addicted to amphetamines, such as cocaine and crack, and methamphetamine, such as crystal meth, the withdrawals include uncomfortable and frightening psychological symptoms such as hallucinations and extreme paranoia. The drug and alcohol treatment programs are equipped for treating these symptoms as well.

What to Expect from Drug and Alcohol Treatment: Rehab

After detox, which may last from 4 to 10 days depending on your progress, you will enter the next level of the program offered at your drug and alcohol treatment. A detox program is not enough, on its own.

Real recovery begins with the residential inpatient rehabilitation level of treatment, called “rehab” for short. This can last up to 30 days, which really is only a drop in the bucket compared to a lifetime. At the rehab level, you will reside in a safe and comfortable environment where all of your needs will be met.

You will be kept comfortable, have case management support, and will have medical services provided. You will attend meetings, called groups, where you will learn about substance abuse and be given the tools to use once you complete the program so that you don’t get caught up in drugs and alcohol again. You will also have group and individual therapy sessions where you can address any dual diagnosis, or co-occurring issues such as depression, anxiety, as well as trauma-related issues.

If you or a loved one is struggling with substance abuse or addiction and don’t know what to expect from a drug and alcohol treatment, please call toll-free 1-800-951-6135 so that you can speak directly with an Addiction Specialist. We are available around the clock to answer your questions and help you decide what’s next.

2014: The Year in Celebrity Drug News

2014: The Year in Celebrity Drug News

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Here it is 2014: The Year in Celebrity Drug News

#1. Creed’s Scott Stapp Has Public Meltdown, Fueled By Drugs

Last November, the lead singer of Creed, Scott Stapp, posted a rambling Facebook video in which he claimed he was broke and homeless due to an IRS error. Stapp has insisted that he’s sober, but has displayed disturbing behavior as of late: he had placed numerous calls to 9-1-1 rambling about terrorist attacks and left a voicemail to the principal of his son’s school, declaring that the school would soon be the victim of an attack from ISIS. Stapp was placed on an involuntary psych hold in November and has since reportedly lost custody of his children.

Wife Jaclyn declared that Stapp was now abusing amphetamines, crystal meth and steroids. His 16-year-old son, Jagger, posted on Twitter that “my father once again chose drugs over his family. He needs help, but refuses to get it. He’s been on a 9 week binge.”

In an interview with The Fix in December 2013, he said he had been sober for over three years, barring sporadic relapses.

#2. Chris Brown Gets Kicked Out Of Rehab and Sent To Jail

Chris Brown ended up in jail last March after being kicked out of court-ordered rehab. Brown was on probation for assaulting then-girlfriend Rihanna in 2009 when he violated, being arrested in October 2013 for felony assault after getting into a fight outside of a hotel in Washington, D.C. He was then ordered to rehab.

Brown was kicked out of the facility after he refused to take a drug test and also for leaving the facility without authorization, among other infractions. He was sentenced in May to 131 days behind bars, including time already served, but was released the following month after serving 108 days.

#3. Philip Seymour Hoffman Dies of Drug Overdose

The well-known and highly acclaimed actor and director tragically died in his NYC apartment last February. Hoffman had attended rehab at age 22 after graduating from NYU and remained sober for 23 years. In May 2013, Hoffman completed a 10-day detox after admitting he had been abusing pills for over a year and heroin for about a week.

Mr. Hoffman was found with a syringe still in his arm and he was pronounced dead at the scene. Police found nearly 50 envelopes of heroin marked “Ace of Spades,” 20 used syringes in a plastic cup, several bags containing an unknown white powder and various prescription drugs.

#4. Phil Rudd Charged With Drug Possession, Murder Plot

The drummer for the prolific rock band AC/DC was charged last November with possession of methamphetamine and marijuana and his alleged drug use may have led to the far more serious charge of planning a murder plot.

Rudd was arrested in New Zealand for allegedly plotting a double-murder and even hiring a hitman. This led to a police raid of his home, which led to finding the drugs. Rudd faces up to 10 years in jail if convicted for murder conspiracy, but has denied the accusations against him, calling them “ludicrous” and vowed that “I’m going back to work with AC/DC, and I don’t care who likes it and who doesn’t.”

#5. Jackie Chan’s Son Arrested On Drug Charges

Jaycee Chan, 32, was arrested in August after a police raid of his Beijing home, along with Taiwanese actor Kai Ko. Chinese media reported that 100 grams of pot were confiscated from his home, leading to a formal charge of Jaycee using his home as a “shelter” for others to take drugs in. It was also reported that Jackie Chan’s son tested positive for marijuana at the time of his arrest.

The trial is expected to begin next year and he could face three years in prison if convicted on all charges.

#6. Michael Phelps Busted For DUI Again, Enters Rehab

Michael Phelps was busted for drunken driving once again on Sept. 30, ten years after his first DUI. The Olympic gold medalist was pulled over for driving 84 mph in a 40 mph zone and failed a series of roadside sobriety tests. Phelps was Breatholized and blew a .14, nearly double the legal limit.

As a result, Phelps was suspended from competition for six months, in addition to pulling him from the Long Course World Championship Team. Phelps quickly responded, announcing that he would be going to rehab.

“I’m going to take some time away to attend a program that will provide the help I need to better understand myself,” he wrote on Twitter. Swimming is a major part of my life, but right now I need to focus my attention on me as an individual.” He has since completed rehab and is back training for competitions next year.

#7. Peaches Geldof Follows Mom’s Fate, Dies From Drug Overdose

British socialite and TV presenter Peaches Geldof died in April from a heroin overdose. Geldof’s death played out in the same her mother’s did. Paula Yates died at age 41 from a heroin overdose in 2000.

The socialite had struggled with substance abuse throughout her life and had been receiving drug treatment in the two years before she died. Her final interview before her death showed Geldof revealing that she being a mother had been a “healing process” to help her “correct those awful parts of my childhood.”

#8. Justin Bieber Busted For DUI

In Miami last year, the Canadian singer was arrested and charged with drunk-driving, resisting arrest and driving without a valid license after being pulled over in a rented Lamborghini. Bieber was initially pulled over after being caught racing at speeds of 60 mph in a 30 mph zone. After failing a roadside sobriety test, he admitted to consuming alcohol, smoking marijuana and using prescription drugs prior to getting behind the wheel.

In the months following this incident, there have been rumors of him being addicted to marijuana and Sizzurp; however, it seems that Bieber, in an effort to start over, has been seen attending Bible classes, as well as taking up tennis and cycling.

#9. Scott Disick Enters Rehab

The father of Kourtney Kardashian’s children was seen entering rehab this year during an episode Kourtney & Khloe Take the Hamptons, which aired last monthDuring a previous episode from November, Disick was heavily intoxicated, falling over and having difficulty forming sentences. His bodyguard had to physically pick him up and carry him to bed and Disick was still under the influence the next morning. Disick then asks his friend if they can take more sleeping pills together.

Disick entered rehab for five days, admitting that he had been using alcohol to cope with the recent deaths of his parents. He reportedly stopped drinking cold turkey afterwards.

#10. Lil Za Arrested Twice In One Day

The aspiring rapper who used to stay in Justin Bieber’s mansion managed to get arrested twice in one day this January. Lil Za (real name: Zavier Smith) was first arrested for drug possession after police found cocaine during a raid of Bieber’s home in California, which was done in connection with a felony search warrant. Reports later stated that the confiscated drugs were actually Molly and Xanax. Police cleared Bieber of any connection to them. Lil Za was then re-arrested for vandalism charges after reportedly smashing a phone inside his holding cell. His bail was increased from $20,000 to $70,000, but he posted it and was then released.

Addiction is a disease that can affect anyone, regardless, of age, gender, class, ethnicity, religion, or creed. Help in the form of specially-designed treatment is available and recovery from addiction is possible. If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free 1-800-951-6135 to speak with an Addiction Specialist today.

3 Reasons Drug Fear Mongering is Dangerous

3 Reasons Drug Fear Mongering is Dangerous

Author: Justin Mckibben

The ‘War on Drugs’ is not something that anyone would say should be taken lightly. It is true that addiction to drugs and alcohol is a dangerous disease, and it is true that it has affected the lives of so many people across the world, but drug fear mongering is dangerous as well.

All of these tactics prove ineffective because they ignore the basic realities of the circumstances they seek to overcome. That includes the fact that addiction is a disease, and that these witch-hunts for addicts as criminals or degenerates push people away from getting the help they need. Here are 3 reasons drug fear mongering is dangerous, and to prove the point we will look at details from specific examples.

  1. Drug fear mongering can actually (ironically) promote drug use

-Example: D.A.R.E. Program

Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.) is a very popular program that was created to combat drug and alcohol addiction by trying to educate kids at a young age. Although D.A.R.E. was designed with the best intentions it is completely ineffective and sometimes even counterproductive. That conclusion was actually reached by the congressional General Accounting Office (GAO), the U.S. Surgeon General, the National Academy of Sciences, and the U.S. Department of Education. Because of the D.A.R.E. programs inability to actually effectively address addiction, the federal government now prohibits schools from spending their Safe and Drug Free Schools funding on D.A.R.E.

The irony of the situation is that based on the fact that after being presented with the concept of D.A.R.E. to keep an eye out for those around you using drugs or drinking, the vast majority of young people greatly exaggerate in their minds the quantity and frequency of drinking among their peers. Therefore, they tend to drink (or drink more) than they would otherwise, in an effort to “fit in.”

So because of the style of awareness D.A.R.E. tried to promote was fueled with paranoia, it actually made things worse by planting the idea to use drug into the minds of children because they believed everyone was doing it.

  1. Drug fear mongering creates false information and panic

-Example: 80’s Crack Baby Scare

Drug fear mongering also tends to take a ‘boogie-man’ approach to addressing the issue of drugs and alcohol. One of the worst parts of fear mongering is that quite often there is false information that is adopted as fact because the media hopes to use it as a powerful tool to draw a lot of attention to an issue by making it seem more urgent and magnifying the horrors of addiction.

Over the decades of the twentieth century, drug use has gone through cycles of intense public awareness and concern and relative indifference. For some of these decades reformers, the public, the media, or legislators focus on a specific drug which stands in for or represents the drug problem generally. The late 1980s witnessed a drug “panic,” “crisis,” or “scare” specific to cocaine, or more specifically crack cocaine. Drug use generally came to be seen as the social problem of the decade and emerged into the forefront like never before. This was strange because drug use had been on the rise for several years by the time it caught media attention in 1985, yet people were rushed into fear as if it fell out of nowhere.

Widespread use of crack cocaine during the 80’s led to the “Crack Baby” scare, when babies born to crack cocaine users sometimes had symptoms including but not limited to jitteriness and smaller heads. Studies at the time blamed prenatal drug use, and experts suggested that the affected children had irreversible brain damage and predicted dire futures for them. These reports led to widespread media coverage featuring breathless headlines and heart-rending images of tiny sick newborns hooked up to hospital machines.

In recent years experts have mostly discounted any link, noting that so-called crack babies often were born prematurely, which could account for many of their early symptoms. Studies that tracked children beyond infancy have failed to find any severe outcomes. Crack-exposed teens had lower scores on developmental tests than other children but their scores were still within normal limits, so the panic that was induced by the media was quite baseless information that was used to fan the flames of the war on drugs with fear in the 1980’s.

  1. Drug fear mongering promotes prisons and not proper treatment for addiction

-Example: Heroin Epidemic

In comparison to the 1980’s ‘Crack Baby’ Panic, America is currently experiencing what the media is announcing as a ‘Heroin Epidemic’ that is sweeping the nation. It is true that recently the numbers of heroin addicts recorded has increased, and the use of heroin has spread, however the real question is why it has suddenly become an ‘epidemic’.

The National Survey on Drug Use and Health reported that America had 373,000 users in 2007 and 669,000 in 2012. The increase is largely attributed to heroin being much cheaper than prescription opiates, which have become increasingly expensive due to reforms combating prescription pill addiction.

That being said, by fear mongering the drug use in this situation, we are only putting the real problem behind us, which is that the country has ineffective incarceration policies for the individuals who are arrested in possession, while actually treating drug addiction as a disease is being largely swept under the rug. Or at least it has up to this point. This kind of publicity controlled through propaganda only prohibits people from seeking help, and it makes some addicts believe they must fit into a certain stigma in order to need treatment.

By putting the fear into the American people about the use of heroin and other opiates, it may be creating healthy fear for those who are not yet using, but that is a small victory compared to the thousands of addicts out there who become terrified of getting honest about their opiate addiction and seeking treatment for their addiction.

The devastation and the evils of the disease of addiction are all very real and a lot of the truth is scary without the scare tactics. Fear mongering is counter-productive to keeping people informed and helping them equip themselves with the means to recover from their addictions. The sad part is that instead of making people afraid to use drugs, fear mongering makes more addicts and alcoholics afraid to seek help. How can you save your life when you’re scared to death? If you or someone you love is struggling from substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free 1-800-951-6135

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