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All across this country in small towns, rural areas and cities, alcoholism and drug abuse are destroying the lives of men, women and their families. Where to turn for help? What to do when friends, dignity and perhaps employment are lost?

The answer is Palm Partners Recovery Center. It’s a proven path to getting sober and staying sober.

Palm Partners’ innovative and consistently successful treatment includes: a focus on holistic health, a multi-disciplinary approach, a 12-step recovery program and customized aftercare. Depend on us for help with:

Charlie Sheen Reflects On Past: Blames ‘Tiger Blood’ Rants On Roid Rage

Charlie Sheen Reflects On Past: Blames 'Tiger Blood' Rants On Roid Rage

(This content is being used for illustrative purposes only; any person depicted in the content is a model)

Author: Shernide Delva

Do you remember Charlie Sheen’s crazy antics back in 2011? Actually, a better question would be, who doesn’t remember?

Here are just a few crazy quotes from those days:

“I have a 10,000-year-old brain and the boogers of a 7-year-old. That’s how I describe myself.”

“I’m tired of pretending I’m not a total bitchin’ rock star from Mars, and people can’t figure me out; they can’t process me. I don’t expect them to. You can’t process me with a normal brain.”

And crowd favorites:

“I’m not bi-polar, I’m bi-winning.”

“I don’t know man, I was bangin’ seven gram rocks and finishing them because that’s how I roll, I have one speed, I have one gear … go!”

Along with mentions of Adonis blood and tiger blood DNA, these quotes from Sheen are difficult for anyone to forget, including Sheen himself.   Jokes aside, that period in Charlie Sheen’s life was indeed a tumultuous one.

Fortunately, quite some time has passed since then. Now, Sheen is opening up about that part of his life and his current mental state.

In an interview with Michael Strahan on Good Morning America, Charlie Sheen explained that during his 2011 meltdown, he was actually using testosterone cream. According to Sheen, the cream he was using “metabolizes into basically a roid rage” and led him to the out-of-control moments memorably caught on camera.

Sheen initially started using testosterone cream in a bid to “keep the old libido up,” he says. However, he was using way above the recommended dosage. Looking back, Sheen feels like a combination of the roid rage and his personal vendetta led to the rampage.

“The whole odyssey, that was basically an accidental roid rage. But there’s some good quotes that came out of it, right?” he joked. “There’s a few fun moments. So bizarre. It’s so bizarre.”

Although Sheen is no longer on the testosterone cream, he admits he can not blame all his actions on the product.

“I think, ultimately, in our blueprint, in our DNA, I believe that we are the sum total of all of our experiences, good and bad. But they don’t lead the charge,” he said. “It’s fun to kind of watch sometimes, but also just a little bit cringeable. It’s like, ‘Dude, what the hell was that?'”

Towards the end of 2015, Charlie Sheen publicly announced his HIV diagnosis. Now, 11 months later, Sheen says he is feeling better than ever. He is part of an FDA study for a new HIV treatment.  However, things were not always so positive. In the early days of his diagnosis, he admits he became suicidal.

“The day I was diagnosed, I immediately wanted to eat a bullet.”

“But my mom was there,” he said. “I wouldn’t do that in front of her or let her find me to clean up that mess.”


Now, Sheen considers himself to be an advocate for others.

“I’m carrying the torch for a lot of folks out there that are suffering from the same thing,” he explained.

For a while, Sheen was making very questionable decisions regarding his HIV treatments. Last year, on an episode of The Dr. Oz Show, Sheen said he was opting for alternative therapies in Mexico instead of traditional HIV medication. Sheen hired Dr. Sam Chachoua, a physician not licensed to practice medicine in the United States. Not too long after, he began to see negative consequences from the move.

Right before taping, Sheen was told that there were detectable traces of HIV in his blood, a stark contrast from his state two months ago. These results led Sheen to conclude that he should immediately return to his normal treatments.  Now, Sheen is part of an FDA study which, if approved, will result in a better treatment for HIV patients.

“It’s in the late stages of its trial run. We are very close to being approved,” Sheen said. “It is not this hideous cocktail that leads to so many side effects, emotionally and physically. It’s one shot a week. I feel like I’m carrying the torch for a lot of folks out there who are suffering from the same thing.”

Charlie Sheen has a new movie, Mad Families, now released on the popular online streaming website Crackle. While he won’t call the movie a comeback, he considers it a “stepping stone” in the new direction of his life.

Despite the criticism, Charlie Sheen has managed to progress from the person he was in 2011. His HIV diagnosis has motivated him to be an advocate for other, and he has slowly turned his life around. If Charlie Sheen can do it, what is stopping you from taking the next step? If you or someone you know is struggling with drug addiction, please call now. Do not wait. Call toll-free today.

    CALL NOW 1-800-951-6135

72 Russians Died After Drinking Scented Bath Oil

72 Russians Died After Drinking Scented Bath Oil

(This content is being used for illustrative purposes only; any person depicted in the content is a model)

Author:Shernide Delva

People are dying from scented bath oils.

Wait, what?

Sounds crazy, but it is true. Over the last week, 72 Russians died after drinking bath oils. Many of the victims were poor residents between the ages of 35 and 50 who could not afford regular alcohol. Instead, they opted for the bath oils because the ingredient label stated it was made from “ethyl alcohol.” Ethyl alcohol is the alcohol used in drinking alcohol.

Unfortunately, the bath oils were not made with just ethyl alcohol. Instead, they were packed with deadly levels of methanol, a toxic alcohol used in antifreeze.

A local prosecutor, Stanislav Zubovsky, said that 57 people were in the hospital over the weekend related to consuming the bath oils. Over 2,000 bottles of the bath oil were seized. Police found an underground manufacturing plant believed to be responsible for producing the tainted liquid, according to ABC News.

As a result of the incident, Russian Prime Minister Dmitri Medvedev called for the government to put controls on the circulation of cheap liquids like perfume and soaps that contain alcohol.

“This is a complete disgrace and clearly we should put an end to it,” Medvedev said in a cabinet meeting on Monday. “Such liquids should simply be banned.”

Russia economy is just starting to recovery since the oil prices plummeted in 2015. The mayor declared a state of emergency, and officials posted warnings in homeless populations in regards to drinking the cheap alcohol knock-offs.

In January, a Russian consumer watchdog group reported that alcohol deaths contributed to the deaths of 30% of Russian men and 15% of Russian women.  Although drinking is an important part of the Russian culture, alcohol is too expensive for some citizens to afford.

This is especially true in the city Irkutsk which is home to 620,000 people.  At one time, the city was home to a booming industry, but the collapse of the Soviet Union and the decreased demand for machinery turned the city into a struggling economy.  With income levels lower than seen before, many find more affordable creative ways to consume alcohol.  Unfortunately, the attempt to maintain drinking culture resulted in unexpected fatalities.

Homeless Population Most At Risk

Russia is not the only area with an issue like this. The homeless population is known for finding ways to consume alcohol and other drugs through synthetic alternatives. The drug k2 is a synthetic form of marijuana popular in homeless areas all across the United States.

Just this November, dozens of homeless people in St. Louis, Missouri were found in a zombie state after consuming the k2 drug.

“People were standing and walking around like zombies,” said St. Louis Fire Chief Dennis Jenkerson. “They didn’t know what they were doing or where they were at.”

It was estimated that in one short period, over 100 members of the homeless population overdosed on the K2 drug. Other drug alternatives commonly used are products like Listerine and hand sanitizer.

Should companies feel obligated to ensure their products are safe for consumption? With the example of the bath oils, should the company be held responsible?

Regardless, addiction is rampant in all communities, both the upper class and homeless populations. Therefore, if you are someone you know are struggling with addiction or mental illness, please reach out. The disease of addiction does not discriminate. Call toll-free today. 

   CALL NOW 1-800-951-6135

The Second Deadliest Drug in the United States is Cocaine

Author: Shernide Delva

The opioid addiction epidemic continues to increase in fatalities each and every year.  The use of opioids tripled between 2010 to 2014 and opioid overdoses occur every 19 minutes, according to the most recent surgeon general’s report. However, all the news about the opioid epidemic overshadowed the second deadliest drug in the United States. What is it, you ask?

Cocaine.

That’s right. The popularity of cocaine has not dwindled in the midst of the opioid epidemic. People are doing it, and doing lots of it. In fact, a recent CDC report revealed that heroin and cocaine are the drugs most frequently involved in overdose deaths in the US.

An analysis from U.S. News and World Report revealed that cocaine is the second most common drug involved in fatal overdoses.  Nevertheless, do not be fooled by these statistics. Opioids are much more deadly than cocaine and have a strong lead in comparison.

Breaking Down the Numbers: Heroin Leading Big Time

While heroin was responsible for 10,863 deaths in 2014 (23.1%), cocaine was responsible for 5,856 deaths (12.4%).  To gather the results, researchers looked at data from death certificates where medical examiners and coroners rule on the cause of death.

“The method was applied to provide a more in-depth understanding of the national picture of the drugs involved in drug overdose deaths,” the researchers wrote.

In addition to revealing the amounts of deaths, the data showed how the prevalence of heroin deaths have increased significantly, while cocaine deaths have remained for the most part stable. For example, in 2010, heroin caused 3,020 fatal overdoses. Only four years later, in 2014 that number tripled to 10,863 deaths. Yet, cocaine stayed relatively stable. In 2010, cocaine deaths were at 4,312 and rose to 5,856 deaths in 2014.

Other drugs that saw dramatic increases were antianxiety medications (4,212 deaths) and fentanyl (4,200 deaths). Although these numbers serve a valuable purpose, researchers do caution comparing numbers across years because increased reporting and detection can skew results.

Drug Interactions: A Deadly Combination

Another important part to note is that 49% of these overdose drugs involved more than one drug, according to 2014 data. Most of the time, overdose deaths involve more than one substance so the numbers could coincide with one another.

“For example, the majority of the drug overdose deaths [in 2014] involving methamphetamine did not involve other drugs,” the researchers wrote. “In contrast, among deaths involving alprazolam and diazepam, more than 95% involved other drugs.”

Overall, the number of overdose deaths increased by 23%, rising from 38,329 in 2010 to 47,055 in 2014. Although drugs other than opioids contributed to the rising overdose rates, the data confirm that opioids have a massive impact on overdose death rates.

“The most frequently mentioned drugs involved in these deaths were the opioids: heroin, oxycodone, methadone, morphine, hydrocodone, and fentanyl,” researchers wrote.

In addition to data about specific drugs, researchers called for more accurate data on overdose deaths to be kept. In the future, they would like a more detailed analysis on these increasing drug overdoses.

“The report also demonstrates the ability of a new method for abstracting data from the death certificate to enhance national monitoring of drug overdose deaths, and it emphasizes the need to include specific drugs involved in the death on the death certificate,” said the researchers.


Whether it is cocaine or opioids like heroin or oxycodone, the epidemic is resulting in massive fatalities. With the new year right around the corner, the time is now to make a change. Your past should not dictate your future. We are here to guide you in the right direction. If you are struggling with drugs or mental illness, do not wait. Call toll-free today.

   CALL NOW 1-800-951-6135

More Sober High Schools Appearing Nationwide But Do They Work?

More Sober High Schools Appearing Nationwide But Do They Work?

(This content is being used for illustrative purposes only; any person depicted in the content is a model)

Author: Shernide Delva

The drug epidemic has affected people from all backgrounds and ages, and unfortunately, that includes students in high school. Now, a local woman in Colorado wants to ensure high school students struggling with addiction have a chance of getting their high school diploma. Her solution? She’s opening up a high school targeted for students struggling with addiction.

Leslie Patterson is a program director at Landmark Community School. She says she had the idea after watching the documentary “The Anonymous People” which was a movie set on exploring recovery high schools in Massachusetts. The documentary made her realize her community needed the same resource.

“We have a lot of youth that suffer from addiction. And it’s not even just addiction, it’s that they’re using drugs and alcohol to cover up whatever it is that they’re not wanting to feel and experience, so providing them alternative interventions so they don’t have to become full-blown addicts, or if they are into their own addiction, then giving them some tools to work with that,” She said.

Unfortunately, it can be difficult for students under 18 years old to find resources for their addiction. Treatment centers targeted for teenagers are scarce, yet high school is usually the period when drug experimentation begins.  Even after receiving treatment, the students are not able to get the same support at school.

“Resources for addiction are horrid, horrendous…families are spending thousands of dollars getting help for their student, and then they go back into high school and then two weeks later they’re relapsing,” said Patterson.

Patterson decided that her community in Colorado deserved the same opportunity that the high school in Massachusetts provided.  The school will run under the umbrella of Community Prep School in District 11 east of downtown Colorado Springs.

“We’re going to start with upwards of 20 students in this first semester, and our first day will be January 30th,” said Martin Schneider, director of Community Prep School.

Over the next five years, they hope to grow to 100 students.  The school will operate as a conventional high school with students between the ages of 14-19 years old. Schools will get a high school diploma through Community Prep, and they will have to earn credits to get their diploma.  However, unlike typical high schools, students struggling with addiction will have the support they need to stay sober.  Schneider believes this will make a tremendous impact on the lives of students.

“When there are cracks in that support system or there’s no support system at all, the relapse rate is close to 90 percent, so kids going back to their old high schools, for instance, after going to treatment, have really, really struggled to maintain sobriety,” said Schneider.

For Leslie Patterson, it’s a mission close to her heart.

“I’m in long-term recovery myself and my addiction started in high school, so it’s a full circle for me to do this also,” Patterson added.

“If you can get a student sober at 15, the trajectory has changed for that child,”

Are These Schools Effective?

One in five high school students meet the criteria for addiction. The consensus for “sober high schools” is that they are effective in preventing further drug abuse.  Research examining these schools shows a significant reduction in substance use as well as mental health symptoms among the students. Each school is different, but for the most part, they provide group and individual counseling, consistent monitoring and individualized attention.

Hopefully, in the future, we will see more schools like these pop up throughout the country. The sooner addiction is treated, the better outcome for long-term recovery. How do you feel about these schools? Regardless of how old you are, it is never too late to seek help for your addiction. Call now.

   CALL NOW 1-800-951-6135

What New Parity Report Means for Mental Health and Substance Abuse

What New Parity Report Means for Mental Health and Substance Abuse

(This content is being used for illustrative purposes only; any person depicted in the content is a model)

Author: Justin Mckibben

In 2008 the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act passed. Ever since then health insurers and employers have progressed toward improving coverage for mental health and substance abuse issues. One step in the new direction includes insurance plans no longer charging higher copays or separate deductibles for mental health care, but beyond that there is more to be done.

In March President Obama announced the establishment of a task force focused on further studying and improving the scope of coverage for mental health to ensure that patients with mental illness and addiction would not face discrimination in their health care.

The task force recently submitted a report in which they have made a series of recommendations. Part of this initiative called for $9.3 million in funding to improve enforcement of the federal parity law. Taking a closer look at the report, this is important news for those trying to find help.

The Task Force Report

As part of the report, the task force authors touch on how the lack of effective treatment impacts more than just the costs of treatment and actually creates more issues and more costs down the road. The report states:

“These disorders affect society in ways that go beyond the direct cost of care. Without effective treatment, people with these health conditions may find it difficult to find or maintain a job, may be less able to pursue education and training opportunities, may require more social support services, and are more likely to have their housing stability threatened.”

This is the truth. People who fail to receive quality care for substance abuse and addiction often end up facing multiple hurdles later on. The fact is there are significant problems with the parity law. But some are probably asking, what is parity and what does it mean for substance abuse?

Parity Law Explained

Mental health parity means equal treatment of mental health and substance abuse disorders in insurance plans. When an insurance plan has parity, it means you should get the same benefits for mental health or addiction treatment as you do for other chronic conditions.

For example: If your insurance plan provides unlimited doctor visits for diabetes, they must also offer unlimited visits for depression or schizophrenia.

However, parity makes no guarantee for quality of coverage. Many would argue that “equal” coverage does not translate to “good” coverage. So if your health insurance is limited, your mental health coverage is also limited.

The rules of parity law can be a little confusing, and there are some big problems with regulation.

Task Force Recommendations

In order to get a comprehensive idea of how to address problems with parity, the task force reached out to several sources. They received 1,161 public comments from:

  • Patients
  • Families
  • Insurers
  • Advocates
  • State regulators

Based on the findings, the task force has enacted some new strategies to work toward move effective parity regulation. Some of these include:

  • The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services is awarding $9.3 million to states to help enforce parity protections.
  • A new government website will help consumers identify the right agency to assist with parity complaints and appeals.
  • A new consumer guide to help patients, families and providers understand their rights and look into whether they have experienced a parity violation.
  • The Department of Labor will report each year on investigations into violations.

The federal task force also recommended the government increase its aptitude to audit health plans for parity compliance. Also they suggest the same for the Department of Labor when assessing civil monetary penalties for violations.

Opinions on Parity Plans

Former congressman Patrick Kennedy is one of the authors of the 2008 parity law. After examining the task force’s report he said the actions were a step in the right direction, but much of it still places the burden of real action on the patients. Kennedy insisted that the next administration will need to be vigilant in enforcing the parity law.

Both the America’s Health Insurance Plans and the American Psychiatric Association showed support for the report and its recommendations.

Benjamin Miller, director of the health policy center at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, has an even more direct stance on the matter. Miller says,

“Separate is not equal — mental health is core to health. People do not see themselves as a disease or a select health benefit, but rather a person who has needs. Benefits and payments should follow the person, address their needs, and address the whole of their health.”

Miller’s idea is that if we want the treatment coverage to be absolutely equal, why not just eliminate any borders of distinction?

What does it all mean?

Essentially, the federal task force is fighting to assure that insurance coverage for mental health and substance abuse be more available and more strictly enforced. At the end of the day, the government realizes that allowing insurance companies to skimp on the bill when it comes to treating these kinds of disorders is not tolerable, and that people should be made more aware of their rights to coverage.

State and federal laws may also be different in regards to protection of parity. People should be educated on how this affects them and how to make sure their insurance providers are offering them the quality and equality of care they’re entitled to.

People struggling with substance abuse and addiction deserve comprehensive and compassionate treatment, and these actions are an important step towards making treatment more available.

Substance abuse should be getting the attention is deserves. Hopefully the discussion on drug policies will gain priority in the upcoming months. If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free now.

   CALL NOW 1-800-951-6135

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