Safe, effective drug/alcohol treatment

All across this country in small towns, rural areas and cities, alcoholism and drug abuse are destroying the lives of men, women and their families. Where to turn for help? What to do when friends, dignity and perhaps employment are lost?

The answer is Palm Partners Recovery Center. It’s a proven path to getting sober and staying sober.

Palm Partners’ innovative and consistently successful treatment includes: a focus on holistic health, a multi-disciplinary approach, a 12-step recovery program and customized aftercare. Depend on us for help with:

Heroin Detox: What You Need to Know

Heroin Detox: What You Need to Know

Every day, thousands of men and women all over America lose their lives to heroin addiction. In every state, there are families and communities suffering from the loss of friends, neighbors and loved ones. Heroin addiction is more prevalent than ever before in our country.

At the same time, there are people every day trying to give up using heroin and other opioid drugs. Some people try to do it on their own, and very few of them succeed. Many end up relapsing due to the pain of withdrawal and the intense dependence on this life-threatening drug.

But there is hope. With professional help and safe, medically assisted heroin detox many people have the opportunity to build a strong foundation for recovering from their addiction.

Let us look at what you need to know about heroin detox when you reach out to get help.

Heroin Detox: Understanding Drug Dependence

Like most drugs, excessive and prolonged abuse of heroin leads to a medical condition called Substance Use Disorder (SUD). But a crucial part of the development of a SUD is drug dependence, and there are two particular kinds of dependence that people should understand.

  1. Physical Dependence

This is about how your body adapts to substances. When the cells of your body can’t function without a substance, that is a clear indication of physical dependence. The body gets used to the presence of a chemical over time, so when the chemical is no longer present the body is forced to regulate itself.

The body also stops producing certain chemicals in the brain naturally because it gets them artificially through drugs. However, once you stop using the drugs the body is no longer producing what it needs.

Physical dependency becomes pretty apparent when you try to stop using heroin without any medical help. When you try to stop using abruptly you experience extremely uncomfortable physical withdrawal symptoms because of the imbalance in the body.

  1. Psychological Dependence

Psychological or emotional dependence is a result of the changes a drug creates in the mind. It is defined as a compulsion or perceived obsession for the substance. So while the individual may not be experiencing intense physical withdrawal, they may be psychologically impaired by the abrupt absence of a substance they have adapted to.

Instead of developing healthy coping skills, most heroin users tend to rely on the drug for dealing with emotional or behavioral issues. If they suddenly remove the drug, they are left defenseless against their issues.

If someone relies heavily on drugs for feelings of pleasure and stimulation, removing the drug may cause them to feel they cannot be happy without it. This is impacted by the drugs chemical interaction with the brain.

And at the end of the day, physical addiction can have psychological side effects, and vice versa. That is why heroin detox should not only offer medical assistance, but also therapeutic resources.

Heroin Detox: Withdrawal Symptoms

Suddenly stopping heroin without any medical assistance is called going “cold turkey” and it throws you almost immediately into withdrawal. “Cold turkey” is not just uncomfortable, it is dangerous. These heroin withdrawals manifest both physically and psychologically, and the symptoms can range in severity and frequency. Some examples of heroin withdrawal symptoms including:

  • Sweating
  • Insomnia
  • Irritation
  • Depression
  • Extreme anxiety
  • Itchiness
  • Excessive yawning and sneezing
  • Runny nose
  • Cold sweats
  • Chills
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Fever
  • Cramp-like pains
  • Involuntary spasms in the limbs
  • Severe muscle and bone aches

Trying to go through withdrawal from heroin without help is extremely difficult. Some people find it impossible due to the severity of their symptoms. Many people find themselves trapped in a cycle or relapse and attempts to recovery because withdrawal symptoms can be so hard to overcome.

This is why heroin detox is so important. This level of care can help ease you off of heroin and other opiates gradually with the use of medications specifically designed to assist with heroin withdrawal symptoms. Having a safe and experienced medical staff makes this process much more manageable. With a physically and emotionally healthy environment, you can start to establish a comprehensive recovery plan.

Heroin Detox: Safe, Medical Care

Heroin detox should always consist of two phases: evaluation and stabilization.

  1. Evaluation

During this first stage of heroin detox, the individual will be given an assessment in order to determine the best course of treatment. It will include obtaining information about:

  • What drugs they have been using
  • The presence of drugs in their system
  • What quantities of drugs have they been using
  • How long have they have been using these drugs
  • Other medications
  • Co-occurring conditions

This is done through a drug screen, along with any further information you provide during the assessment. Because programs for heroin detox are in a medical setting, the results of your drug screen and information disclosed during your assessment are strictly confidential just like any other medical information is.

  1. Stabilization

During a heroin detox program, the stabilization stage will utilize all the information you provide during your initial assessment to design an effective detox plan. Taper medications are often used in order to wean you off of heroin in both a safe and comfortable way. Detoxing from heroin and other narcotic opiates like prescription painkillers should always be done in a professional and effective manner.

There are many kinds of medication designed to help combat opioid addiction. Carefully consider your options with the medical addiction specialist to ensure you are getting the best possible care. Be sure to provide them with accurate health information for the best results.

Quality care during stabilization should also include providing therapeutic resources for the emotional and psychological side effects. Having support for your mental and emotional well-being is also extremely important for relapse prevention. It lays the groundwork for developing healthy and sustainable coping skills. With the right care, you can take this time to design a personalized recovery plan that is right for you and addresses all of your specific needs to help you be more successful in recovery.

Are you struggling with a dependence on heroin? Are you trying to quit but have failed on your own? Consider reaching out to the caring and compassionate professionals of Palm Partners Recovery Center. If you or a loved one is struggling with heroin abuse or addiction, please call toll-free now. We want to help.

CALL NOW 1-800-951-6135

Client VS Culture: Addiction Treatment Only Works if We Do

Client VS Culture: Addiction Treatment Only Works if We Do

(This content is being used for illustrative purposes only; any person depicted in the content is a model)

Author: Justin Mckibben

As a recovered alcoholic and drug addict it is a truly gratifying experience to work in the field of addiction treatment, and even more so to work for the company that helped save my life. Palm Healthcare Company is a truly unique organization that is committed to compassionate and effective treatment, and there is no telling how many lives have been positively and permanently impacted because of what they (or should I say WE) do. It is an amazing thing to be a part of, and a worthy cause to work for.

That is a crucial part of addiction treatment and recovery; work. The real work is for those trying to recover.

One thing I notice about some clients these days in addiction treatment is less of a willingness to do that work. When I was getting treatment everyone seemed desperate to do anything that would make a difference in their lives. Yet these days I see some people who act as if the program is supposed to do the work for you.

Is our current addiction treatment culture somehow convincing people they don’t have to do the work for real change? How can we work together to change it?

On to the Next One

The culture surrounding addiction treatment and recovery has changed. Breaking the stigma surrounding addiction is a critical step in helping more people get the help they need. Expanding availability is amazing and we should all work toward making even more treatment options available. It could help save thousands of the people who die every year from overdose and drug-related issues.

However, it also seems some have the idea that they will always be able to find some treatment program, legitimate or not, willing to take them. This shift toward people thinking they can just keep hitting restart has almost watered down the opportunity or having a fresh start in the first place.

This might be comforting to some people; the idea that if they don’t like one program they have options. But ultimately what people have to understand is that a treatment program can only be effective if you participate in it. You can go to a dozen different programs and still get very little value if you do not show up and try to engage in the recovery process.

We can complain about the “revolving door” metaphor all we want, but if people aren’t going to take steps toward something better, they are volunteering for more of the same.

Sadly, some people still think there is always the next place. This is part of the reason programs that put an emphasis on relapse prevention and aftercare are so important. Continued accountability can help people maintain their progress without having a nonchalant attitude about the process.

What if you never make it to the next place? Regardless, why wouldn’t you want to make this place the last place?

Of course, both sides of the culture have to take steps. Public officials, treatment providers, and advocacy groups should continue working together to better enforce regulations for treatment, eliminating criminal operators and protecting client rights.

Taking it Serious

This point actually goes hand in hand with the first. As more people are exposed to more resources they might take the availability of new opportunities for granted.

In an industry obstructed by shady operators, people can also become jaded. If you have sought treatment with programs that provide little to no real resources or solutions you might stop taking addiction treatment seriously, even if you get a great opportunity with a reputable and innovative program.

If you don’t take the treatment seriously you probably won’t take your recovery seriously, either.

Of course no one is naïve enough to say the opioid epidemic and overdose rates aren’t serious. But if we know how bad it is; if we see the devastation caused in our own lives or those we love, why don’t we appreciate that gift of desperation and commit to doing the work? Has the addiction treatment client culture taught people that it doesn’t really matter? Do clients think recovery isn’t that serious once you get past the withdrawals or the troubles you get caught up in while using or drinking?

These are valid and sometimes difficult hurdles, but many still say that is the easy part. The rest of the work comes with committing to a treatment plan and following through.

Getting Back to Gratitude

I think this may be the core concept. The culture change within the recovery community is in many ways constructive, but it also has taken some of the raw truth out of the situation for some people.

I think we should try to get true gratitude back into the culture of addiction treatment. We should be grateful that we have more resources than ever, with more professionals working to revolutionize recovery. Let us be grateful that on a national level the world is starting to have greater respect and understanding for those suffering from addiction. We should be grateful for the opportunity to get help when we finally get it because a lot of people never do.

But to the client that contributes to the recovery culture- always remember that true gratitude takes action.

If you say you are grateful to be in treatment, take your treatment seriously and participate. If you are grateful for an opportunity, don’t waste it because you think you can bank on another one right around the corner. So if you want something different, do something different instead of thinking you need to go somewhere different.

And let us all be grateful that there are more opportunities for people to find a solution that could save their life.

Cultivate Better Culture

As holistic treatment providers, Palm Partners Recovery Center will continue working to support recovery professionals within the Palm Healthcare Company organization and within our industry; to strive for better services and to unite against illegitimate operators.

But we as alcoholic or addicted individuals in recovery also need to be willing to put in some work. For anyone like me, who spent years abusing substances to the point it felt like my life depended on it, it is going to take some real work to get better.

If we as individuals want to advocate for recovery, let us advocate that people do the work. Let us appreciate the value of mental health care. Let us appreciate the value of addiction education and cognitive behavioral therapy. We can cultivate a better culture for ourselves; as clients and as providers.

WE means all of us. It means the healthcare providers, the individuals in recovery who have been lucky enough to get this far and the addicts and alcoholics out there still suffering. Addiction treatment works; recovery works… if WE do.

I punch that clock every day. I’m grateful for this work, so I do it. But WE can do more.

As a culture, we have the power to transformed and elevate the lives of millions of people everywhere through recovery from drugs and alcohol. It takes work. If you are ready to take that step and work for a better future, Palm Partners wants to help. Please call toll-free now.

CALL NOW 1-800-951-6135

Constant Threats to Health Coverage Hurting National Addiction Recovery

Constant Threats to Health Coverage Hurting National Addiction Recovery

Author: Justin Mckibben

When we talk about national addiction recovery, what we mean is acknowledging how we as a country and a culture are recovering in our communities. How are we supporting those in addiction treatment? What services are we making available? How is our economy recovering? What are we doing to prevent the spread of addiction?

So if we are taking away resources that not only treat those already struggling, but also prevent more people from suffering, how do we expect to ever escape the devastation caused by the opioid epidemic and rise of overdose deaths?

One of the most divisive issues facing America today is access to healthcare and the extent to which health coverage should or should not be provided. The debate has gone on for a long time, and in the shuffle of each proposal, it seems mental health and addiction services are constantly threatened. Recently there have been more attacks on addiction treatment access. So how is the possibility of more decreases in health coverage going to hurt national addiction recovery?

The Parity Protections

Once upon a time in 2008, the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA) created guidelines that required health insurers to treat mental health and addiction coverage exactly the same as they would with medical and surgical care options. So this means that prior to the MHPAEA those who were lucky enough to have health insurance still could not be guaranteed to receive equitable benefits for mental health or substance abuse care.

These protections were even further expanded by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and legislation put forth by Congress in 2016 with the 21st Century Cures Act, which includes tougher enforcement of parity requirements.

Since the Trump administration stepped in adamantly proclaiming the goal or repealing and replacing the ACA there has been a lot of concern about whether or not any new proposals will decrease health coverage for mental health and addiction services. Many addiction and mental health advocates worry that parity protections and enforcement will also lose their power.

As of yet, politicians are still hoping for a compromise that will keep the protections and resources for treating addiction and mental health intact.

BCBS Cuts Mental Health Coverage

One instance of concerning changes in policy has come out of Minnesota. Just this September the largest insurance carrier in the area, Blue Cross Blue Shield, is making drastic decreases to payments to mental health providers.

We are talking about cuts in addiction and mental health coverage to the tune of that’s 33%!

This decision came after a recent survey showed that the individual therapy costs of Minnesota had exceeded the national average for the last two years. But mental health professionals immediately spoke out against this move. Protests actually took place on Thursday the 14th outside the headquarters of Blue Cross Blue Shield in Eagan, MN. Many advocates and protesters are saying these kinds of cuts will put mental health clinics out of business.

The insurance provider is now under fire as caregivers insist this change will discourage necessary, extended psychotherapy services. People in Minnesota see decisions like that of BCBS as being a violation of the protections offered by parity.

If this kind of policy shift within insurance providers becomes a trend, we could see a dramatic decrease in the people getting substance abuse and mental health treatment. These changes can hurt our national addiction recovery by slowly cutting off the people who need every chance they can get, especially during a devastating opioid epidemic.

Threats within Medicaid

Believe it or not, Medicaid is currently the single largest payer for behavioral health services in America. Threats to the Medicaid health coverage of services like this could do critical damage.

At one point the Trump administration and congressional leaders seemed partial to the idea of turning Medicaid into a block grant program. This strategy would give states a fixed amount of money to provide healthcare for low-income residents. However, policy experts say that means states would have to:

  • Reduce eligibility
  • Narrow the scope of benefits
  • Impose cost-sharing requirements

All of which would also impact the number of people seeking substance abuse and mental health treatment.

Recently GOP representatives and the Trump administration began the work of fundamentally altering state Medicaid programs. Some of these new requirements include governors pushing for:

So again, there is the very real possibility of more hurdles being put in-between those who need help and the already limited resources available to them.

Stigma Influencing Policy

The bigger part of this issue is that these shifts are happening in a way that shows how stigma is influencing policy. We are only further hurting our national addiction recovery by letting this idea that addiction is a moral failing or class issue limit what we are willing to provide to those who need help.

The reason behavioral and mental health services are so crucial is because the cause of addiction is not just the drugs themselves. The vast majority of recovery advocates endorse the concept that addiction develops from multiple factors, such as:

  • Lack of access to resources
  • Poor social networks
  • Trauma

So in fact, by limiting coverage to mental health services, the problem could be magnified.

Mental health services like behavioral therapy being lost with a decrease in coverage means that more children and young adults could go without the support systems. What this does is puts more people in the exact circumstances where we see substance abuse and addiction grow.

So in essence, not only could these constant threats to addiction and mental health coverage be taking away treatment for those already addicted, but it also takes away from prevention programs in communities that fight to keep addiction rates down.

National Addiction Recovery Effects Everyone

If we have any hope of having sustainable national addiction recovery then it is vital that our country continues to push for mental health parity in every discussion about healthcare. If we ever hope to overcome the demoralization of communities we have to fight for mental health and addiction services.

This isn’t about treating the individual’s symptoms with just medications either. Access to other crucial elements like housing, medical care, and basic preventative measures all contribute to the overall mental health of any individual.

When people have better access to the specific levels of care they need, we empower them to contribute to the better communities we need for healthy nation-wide recovery.

People struggling with substance abuse and mental health disorders deserve comprehensive and compassionate treatment, and we should all fight to protect coverage that makes treatment more available. If you or someone you love is struggling, please call toll-free now.

CALL NOW 1-800-951-6135

Rapper DMX Reportedly In New Hampshire For Drug Treatment

Rapper DMX Reportedly In New Hampshire For Drug Treatment

Author: Shernide Delva

A few weeks ago, my sister told me about an upcoming concert that would celebrate popular acts such as DMX and several others. The event was called the “Ruff Ryders and Friends – Reunion Tour – Past, Present and Future” and would be in Miami on September 7th.

Tickets were cheap so I figured why not. I opened my computer and prepared to purchase the tickets for the show until I read the letters in red: “Canceled.” This was certainly not what I had hoped for.

Why did the show get canceled? 

In fact, why did the entire tour get canceled?  I could not believe my eyes as I glanced over the list of cancellations. Cancelling an entire tour is practically unheard of. What happened? Sadly, the answer involves drug addiction.

After some careful searching, I discovered a TMZ article which reported back in April that DMX had to cancel his shows due to an “unspecified medical issue.” Sources at a Los Angeles show state the rapper had been drinking heavily.

His history with substance abuse is not anything surprising. In the past, the rapper was open about his journey to addiction recovery. Therefore, when news of his drinking spread, relapse concerns heightened.

It turns out  DMX has reportedly sought treatment for drug addiction. Addiction treatment reports surfaced a couple weeks after the rapper was put on house arrest for violating bail conditions.

According to speculations, the 46-year old is undergoing treatment in the Nashua, New Hampshire area or is living in a sober home. The Nashua Telegraph reported that DMX, whose real name is Earl Simmons, was spotted at a local Buffalo Wild Wings, a Shaw’s supermarket, and a Walmart.

Legal Troubles

Along with addiction troubles, Simmons is facing charges that he allegedly owes $1.7 million in back taxes dating back to 2000. He has pleaded not guilty to these charges and was freed on $500,000 bail, according to Billboard. Still, while he was on bail, the rapper failed drug test four times. These test found cocaine, opiates, and pot in his system. Because of these results, Manhattan Federal Judge Jed Rakoff put him under house confinement on August 11.

During the hearing, the judge stated that Simmons had violated bail “probably more times than I can remember,” according to Court House News. He chose not to send the rapper to jail, although he described Simmons’s drug addiction as “gross.” He said that his past run-ins with the law exemplified that he’s had “more than a passing acquaintance with illegal drugs.”

After that hearing, DMX told a reporter, “When God is for you, who can be against you?”

The judge reportedly lifted Simmons’s house arrest on the condition that he enter a sober program and travel with a sober coach around the clock. According to court documents reviewed by TMZ, the rapper would need permission to leave New York State.

According to his lawyer Murray Richman, the rapper has decided to go to rehab on his own.

“This is a voluntary move on his part,” Richman said.

It is clear that DMX has struggled on and off with drug addiction. We wish him the best as he seeks a life free from the grips of substance abuse. Recovery is possible, and it is the answer out of this cycle. If you are struggling with drugs or alcohol dependency, please call now. We are here to help. Do not wait.  

CALL NOW 1-800-951-6135

Celebrity Rehab Host Dr. Drew Blames Opioid Epidemic on Doctors

Celebrity Rehab Host Dr. Drew Blames Opioid Epidemic on Doctors

Celebrity Rehab Host Dr. Drew Blames Opioid Epidemic on Doctors

Dr. Drew Pinsky, a board-certified addictions specialist, famous as the host of Celebrity Rehab With Dr. Drew, recently responded to a New York Times analysis. The analysis revealed that drug-related deaths have spiked to 19% across the country in 2016.  According to the report, drug overdoses are now the leading cause of death for Americans under 50.

In response, Dr. Drew says this epidemic was brought on by the doctors. He blames doctors who continued prescribing opioids to patients despite their awareness of the high risk of addiction.

“The reason we have all these heroin addicts is because physicians over-prescribed opiates and then cut these patients off as opposed to getting them treatment,” he said recently on KABC radio. “And when you cut an opiate addict off, the state they’re in requires they find an alternative source of opiates. The cheapest best route now—fentanyl.”

Although his words are quite direct, they hold true.

Last week, an article published in The New England Journal of Medicine argued that the medical community wrongly cited a small 1980s editorial to repeatedly claim that opioids did not have highly addictive qualities.

“The crisis arose in part because physicians were told that the risk of addiction was low when opioids were prescribed for chronic pain. A one-paragraph letter that was published in the Journal in 1980 was widely invoked in support of this claim, even though no evidence was provided by the correspondents,” the editorial reads.

Essentially, doctors were using a letter rather than a clinical evidence to validate the claim that opioids were not addictive. This led many patients into believing that the medications they were using would not cause any form of dependence.

Addiction Stigma Further Wreaks Havoc

Furthermore, Dr. Drew states stigma surrounding addiction prevents doctors from addressing any concerns they may feel regarding their patients.

“They are afraid of the term addiction. They feel as though diagnosing someone with addiction is somehow judging them,” he continued.

Doctors who regularly prescribe opioids are at the root of the problem, Dr. Drew states, because the chances of dependence are high, and patients are often unaware of how real the risk really is.

“70 to 80% of people develop disabling consequences from their relationship with opiates,” Dr. Drew said,

The problem is when doctors continue to prescribe opioids despite the high risk of addiction, or worse, cut off a patient’s supply to opioids without providing some sort of addiction treatment option.

Patient Satisfaction is King

There is also a mindset in medicine that must abide by the patient when it comes to pain management.

“The discipline holds that ‘pain is what the patient says it is. Who are we to say when we have pain control? Pain control is achieved when the patient says it’s achieved.’ And that group will only admit to the fact that perhaps 30% of the patients get a little bit of a problem,” he said.

Stigma around addiction keeps physicians from talking to their patients about the risks of dependence. This leads to long-term dependence. While there have been regulations in place to prevent abuse, this often backfires.

Many people who were once dependent on opioid prescriptions turn to heroin due to the increased availability and decreased price cost. Heroin varies significantly in strength and many strands contain powerful substances like fentanyl which lead to overdose fatalities.

The opioid epidemic is a complex problem with a myriad of potential solutions. However, it is uncertain what solution will boast the best results.  If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free now.

CALL NOW 1-800-951-6135

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