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California says NO to Pot Delivering Drones

California says NO to Pot Delivering Drones

Californians expecting to get their marijuana delivered via drone should not hold their breath. A new set of regulations will make it harder for California businesses who try to deliver pot in unique ways.

The legalization of marijuana has raised a host of controversy. For one, the question of who has the right to distribute pot is already a complex issue. However, now there is the question of how these products get delivered.

Pot Drones? Should they be allowed?

California legislators are hoping to get these questions answered before issuing dispensary licenses next year. They came together this month to lay down the rules. Ultimately, it was decided that marijuana could NOT be delivered by drones.

The decision was part of the Commercial Cannabis Business Licensing Program Regulations released by the state.

“Transportation may not be done by aircraft, watercraft, rail, drones, human-powered vehicles, or unmanned vehicles,” the regulations read, according to Ars Technica.

While deliveries will be allowed, they must adhere to the following guidelines:

Deliveries may be made only in person by enclosed motor vehicle. Cannabis goods may not be visible to the public during deliveries. Cannabis goods may not be left in an unattended motor vehicle unless the vehicle has an active alarm system. Vehicles used for delivery must have a dedicated, active GPS device that enables the dispensary to identify the geographic location of the vehicle during delivery.”

The news will be a major disappointment to the handful of businesses in California who already promised future pot deliveries by drone. One company, MDelivers, said the opportunity to deliver marijuana via drone was “unmistakable.”

Nevertheless, the company CEO did not count on lawmakers forbidding drone deliveries:

After navigating the complexities of medical marijuana permitting, the state and FAA licensing process was actually pretty simple. Nobody can jump in at the 11th hour and rewrite the laws of aerodynamics,” Chris Boudreau, CEO and founder of MDelivers said in a blog post before the regulations were announced.

With the new policies in place, there is no telling how entrepreneurs will get marijuana to their customers. Even if drones are off the table, there are a variety of other new, interesting methods being considered.

We may see a vending machine attached to a self-driving car before we see a drone,” Marshall Hayner, CEO of Trees Delivery, told Mashable.

As California prepares to expand its cannabis market, there continues to be challenges among those against marijuana legalization, especially when it comes to the products crossing state lines illegally. This has already been a major concern for states where port had been legal for recreational use such as Colorado and Oregon.

Surrounding states are trying to address the marijuana diversion issue by requiring pot businesses to track their product from “seed to store.” Time will tell how these sorts of issues will be regulated.

Furthermore, there remains to be conflicting ideologies on whether or not marijuana use is beneficials. While there has been proven benefits of marijuana use, there are also negative effects of marijuana use. Like any drug, marijuana has the potential to be abused.

As more and more states legalize marijuana, logistical challenges remain such as how the products can be delivered. Marijuana remains illegal under federal law, where it’s still classified as a controlled substance. This results in a variety of challenges in states like Colorado where recreational marijuana is legal.

The federal government requires that Colorado and any state that legalizes marijuana work together to prevent:

  • Distribution of marijuana to minors.
  • Transporting marijuana from states where it’s legal to other states.
  • Growing marijuana on public lands.
  • Marijuana possession or use on federal property.
  • Other criminal activity or violence associated with the sale of marijuana.

It is important to remember that like any drug, marijuana has the potential to be abused. Do not feel shame for feeling out of control of your marijuana use. Stigma should not prevent you from seeking treatment. If you or someone you know is struggling with substance abuse, please reach out today. Do not wait. Call toll-free now.

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Palm Beach County Votes to Decriminalize Marijuana

Palm Beach County Votes to Decriminalize MarijuanaIn case you missed it, Palm Beach Country will now decriminalize marijuana. With a 4 to 1 vote made on Tuesday, Palm Beach is now following in the footsteps of West Palm Beach and Miami Beach in the effort to reduce marijuana arrests.

“We have to understand that we cannot legislate and lock up everybody for everything they do,” Commissioner Priscilla Taylor said at Tuesday’s commission meeting.

The new ordinance states that anyone with possession of 20 grams or less of marijuana will no longer be arrested. Instead, law enforcement will have the option to issue a $100 citation for the possession. Low on funds? Not a problem. Those who cannot pay the citation will have the option of working it off through community service hours.

Let’s Break This Down

Just to put it all into perspective, here is an overview on what the new ordinance means for residents in Palm Beach County:

  • How many grams? According to the ordinance, 20 grams or less of marijuana is eligible for a fine. If someone is found with more, they face harsher penalties.
  • What’s the punishment? If found possessing 20 grams or less of marijuana, officer would issue a $100 fine and a civil citation.
  • When does this go into effect? As soon as the law is filed with Florida Department of State, which estimated to be in about 10 days.
  • What if someone can’t pay? If you are unable to pay, you have the option of doing 10 hours of community service instead.
  • Does this mean marijuana is legal? No, marijuana is still a criminal offense in the state of Florida. Even if you are caught with less than 20 grams of pot in Palm Beach County, the officer has the choice of whether to issue a citation or a criminal arrest.
  • How many citations can I get? A person caught with a small possession of pot is allowed to receive a citation a maximum of two times.
  • Underage? The ordinance only applies to those that are 18 and older.

The Palm Beach ordinance passed with a 4 to 1 vote, and Commissioner Hal Valeche was the only one in opposition of the ordinance. Valeche said he believes marijuana is a gateway drug that leads to harder drugs. He is also worried about discrimination that can occur when it comes to an officer choosing to give a fine over a misdemeanor.

“You’ve gotta have pretty firm and hard guidelines as to how you chose which one to do,” Valeche says. “Otherwise I think you open yourself up to claims that you’re treating different individuals differently.”

Valeche could very well have a point. A 2013 report with the American Civil Liberties Union revealed that on average, black residents are close to four times more likely to be arrested for possession of marijuana than whites, despite the statistics that show marijuana use is equal among both races.

Looking at other states,  New York decriminalized the possession of less than 25 grams of marijuana way back in 1977. The law decriminalized pot provided it was not in “public view,” however this law was largely ignored for the better part of 38 years. Police officers found a loophole and forced suspects to empty their pockets, essentially taking the drugs into “public view.”

However, on Nov. 10, 2014, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and Police Commissioner Bill Bratton called a press conference and announced that the city would stop filing criminal charges for people carrying small amounts of pot. Since 2014, marijuana arrests have gone down significantly, however the city struggles with issues of discrimination in lower class neighborhoods compared to the higher class.

In Florida, those who advocate the ordinance say that younger people deserve a second chance. Between 2010 and 2014, more than more than 7,500 cases in the county involved possession of 20 grams of marijuana or less. In 90 percent of these cases, the person ended up in jail. This law will change that. Although marijuana reform continues to be a hard hitting topic increasing in support, many are concerned about the potential harm.

Addiction is a concern for many and if your substance abuse is becoming unmanageable, you should seek treatment, regardless of whether your drug of choice is legal or not. If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free 1-800-951-6135.

Author: Shernide Delva

Colorado Pot Crops Found to Have Dangerous Levels of Pesticides

Colorado Pot Crops Found to Have Dangerous Levels of PesticidesAs green as Colorado is known to be, it looks like their marijuana crops are not as green as one would hope.Recent studies reveal that Colorado’s marijuana crops have “dangerous levels” of pesticides and the news is inciting panic among people and the state’s agricultural agencies.

According to last week’s CNN report, at least one legal over-the-counter pot product tested positive for illegally high levels of the neurotoxin imidacloprid. The news of the pesticides led to a recall of 2,362 pot products.

Unfortunately, this is not the first study to find toxins in marijuana products. Just last September, a study from the Denver Post found that the marijuana products they tested contained six times the legal amount of pesticides in consumable products.

To put it in perspective, if the same amount of pesticides were found on a food product like avocados, they would be immediately pulled off the shelves. However, since Colorado only recently legalized marijuana, they are still figuring out how to deal with these types of issues.

Since marijuana remains illegal on a federal level, there is no FDA regulation to step in and correct the issue leaving pesticide legislation up to the states. This lack of government oversight leads to confusion on the quantities of pesticides that should be allowed in marijuana products.

The Ever-Changing Cannabis Laws

The marijuana businesses in Colorado are not required to test products for pesticides before they sell them. They also do not have to test products before making them available for sale. Instead, consumers and businesses must exercise extreme caution before selling and consuming unregulated products. Various state agencies are hoping to remedy this problem.

As for now, Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper just issued an executive order earlier this month allowing state agencies the authority to pull products off the shelves and destroy them if they contain higher than the approved levels of pesticides.

“When a pesticide is applied to a crop in a manner that is inconsistent with the pesticide’s label, and the crop is contaminated by that pesticide, it constitutes a threat to the public safety,” the order said.

The Denver Post reported that Colorado is also working to pass a legislation preventing illegal pesticides from being used in the first place. Legislator is working to pass rules that would limit the amount of pesticides used in marijuana that are approved for consumption. The goal is that eventually marijuana will be used safely in greenhouses and will be safer for human consumption. Until then, Colorado cannabis lover must remember to proceed with caution.

With the news of pesticides in marijuana products, it is important to know the environmental impacts of marijuana farms. We have discussed in detail how marijuana farms are causing serious damage to the environment in areas like California. In California, run-off from marijuana farms get into the water and causes damage to the ecosystem. Also, since marijuana requires high amount of water to grow successfully, California is facing a major water shortage and marijuana farms are part of the problem.

The fact that marijuana is only legal on a state by state basis makes the process of establishing clear procedures difficult since regulations are not able to be considered on a federal level. In states where marijuana is legal, businesses have to rely on cash-only transactions as they are unable to use federal banking systems.

Overall, the issue of marijuana reform is an increasingly complex issue and in the future, solutions to the problems of legalization will be addressed. If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free 1-800-951-6135

-Author: Shernide Delva

Vets with PTSD Smoke Marijuana for Government Study

Vets with PTSD Smoke Marijuana for Government Study

By Cheryl Steinberg

When you think “PTSD,” you probably imagine our war veterans returning home who are dealing with debilitating mental illness – especially post-traumatic stress disorder. Although PTSD can affect anyone who has experienced or even witnessed a traumatic event, our veterans, by far, make up a large portion of Americans with this form of mental illness.

With marijuana gaining more and more acceptance in the country, for both medical and recreational use, its high time we made it possible for vets to reap any benefits cannabis may have.

Well, now for the first time, vets who suffer from PTSD will be allowed to smoke marijuana as part of a government-backed study.

Vets with PTSD Smoke Marijuana for Government Study

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) recently decided to expand the nation’s marijuana cultivation program – in which it contracts with the University of Mississippi to grow marijuana for use in research studies – opening the door for new treatment studies to be conducted.

The contract was renewed in 2015, leading the way for more new treatment studies.

And now, one of the most significant studies that’s been caught up in red tape is finally coming to fruition: a study designed to help our military veterans cope better with the symptoms of post-traumatic stress syndrome.NIDA will supply new strains of federally-grown cannabis to the researchers. NIDA’s goal for its new growth program is to keep up with all of the diverse strains of cannabis that are currently being offered by the medical marijuana industry.

American Vets and PTSD

The Veterans Affairs Department estimates that between 11% and 20% of Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans respectively suffer from PTSD. Given the military-induced severity of post-traumatic stress disorder, it is hoped the marijuana will provide relief to thousands of veterans that fought so bravely for their country.

The Study

Seventy-six veterans will take part in the study that will measure the effects of different potencies of marijuana that is smoked in treating their symptoms related to PTSD.

A spokesman for the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies, Brad Burge, explained that the research project is, “the first whole-plant marijuana study.” This means that the marijuana used in the study will not be manufactured into a pill or a drink form; this PTSD study will actually allow the participating veterans to use marijuana as a medicine by smoking it.

Although the federal government approved the study a year ago, it has been on hold, pending approval by NIDA in order to gain access to the drug supply needed. Now that NIDA has renewed the contract with U of Miss., it looks like the study is finally going to be a ‘go.’

A major challenge of the study is that, thus far, NIDA has only produced three of the four strains of marijuana needed for the research. This includes a “placebo” strain. “We have approval to purchase it from NIDA, but they won’t give us a time estimate on when they’ll be able to deliver it,” Burge said.

If you or someone you love is struggling with a psychiatric disorder, such as PTSD, and has turned to drugs in order to cope, this can lead to more emotional and physical problems. Dual diagnosis treatment is available, which treats all issues simultaneously for the best treatment outcomes. Please call toll-free 1-800-951-6135.

The Cannabis Social Clubs of Italy

The Cannabis Social Clubs of Italy

The underground cannabis social clubs of Italy – CSCs – provide medical marijuana to their member-patients. All CSCs are non-commercial organizations that organize the production and distribution of small quantities of marijuana, just enough to cover the needs of members.

In Italy, personal consumption is somewhat tolerated but cultivating, buying, and selling weed is illegal. Italy legalized cannabis for medical purposes in 2013 under a special program overseen by local healthcare services, Azienda Sanitare Locale.

One CSC located, in the heart of Rome, started out as a small group who grew its own marijuana for the personal use of its members. In 2001, the social center identified three of its members who were medical patients, gave them their own bags of cannabis, and began looking for more people who could benefit from easy, continuous access to marijuana. Now with a focus on medical marijuana patients, the CSC was born.

“CSCs are based on the empowerment and responsibility [of individuals],” says Alberto, a CSC member and one of the main growers who cultivates the marijuana for the members who are unable to do so for themselves.

“Patients are not too afraid. Health is a basic human right,” says Alberto. Some members have gone to court for growing – cases that have since been thrown out – and the police once paid Alberto a visit. But as a CSC member’s daughter points out, “Who’s going to arrest a sick person?”

CSCs are a not-for-profit operation. Alberto emphasizes that “It’s a closed circuit. Everyone must show signed medical documentation clarifying their sickness and diagnosis, he explains, and all patients must already be consumers. He adds, “We don’t buy and we don’t sell.” Theoretically, this set-up helps to shield them from legal problems. And, although they operate in this gray area and provide what many believe is a valuable service for people, CSCs is still vaguely illicit.

In February 2014, Italy overturned Senator Giovandari’s co-authored bill that equated cannabis with heroin, making the penalties for marijuana possession much less strict. And the CSC benefits from Article 12 of the Charter of Fundamental Human Rights of the European Union, which states, “everyone has the right to freedom of peaceful assembly and association at all levels.”

Italy finally legalized cannabis for medical purposes in 2013 after growing pressure to do so from both medical and recreational marijuana supporters. As a result, Azienda Sanitare Locale was formed; it is the special medical marijuana program that is overseen by local healthcare services.

Under this program, medical marijuana is imported from the Netherlands, and then tax and transport costs are applied, driving up costs by nearly double what it would originally sell for. A gram can go for 38 euros, or $49. Depending on how much is needed, a patient can easily pay up to 1,000 euros, or $1,200, a month for treatment. As a result, only about 60 patients have signed up for the program. For those who want cheap and easy access to weed to alleviate their medical symptoms, the restrictions put in place by the government are at best a nuisance and at worst, dehumanizing.

So, for some small groups the CSCs are the best bet at getting the medicine they need.

With medical marijuana and recreational marijuana becoming more widely accepted in this country, it might be difficult to know if your use has become more of a habit or even an addiction. If you think that your marijuana habit has gotten out of control, help is available. More and more people are seeking treatment for weed because, for them, it has become a problem. Call us toll-free at 1-800-951-6135 to speak with an Addiction Specialist who can answer your questions, day or night.

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