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The answer is Palm Partners Recovery Center. It’s a proven path to getting sober and staying sober.

Palm Partners’ innovative and consistently successful treatment includes: a focus on holistic health, a multi-disciplinary approach, a 12-step recovery program and customized aftercare. Depend on us for help with:

Substance Showdown: Ritalin vs. Meth

Substance Showdown: Ritalin vs. Meth

 

Author: Justin Mckibben

The words Crystal Meth have a pretty solid reputation as the name of a dangerous and devastating drug. The physical signs of meth due to the recent surge of TV series covering this drug both in drama shows such as “Breaking Bad” to documentary style pieces dedicated to educating the public, which quite often feature before and after pictures of people on meth, like The Meth Project.

But why Ritalin? Is that not a prescription medication for behavioral issues like ADHD? So isn’t it safe? Well this stimulant medication is quickly gaining some notoriety of its own due to the adverse health effects caused by regular abuse and misuse of this medication. So today on the substance showdown we take a look at what may seem like a one sided fight, but should be a good example of why you should not under-estimate the under-dog: Crystal Meth vs Ritalin.

This is a substance showdown: Ritalin vs Meth

The two substances, Ritalin and meth will go head to head for three rounds based on: health effects, insidiousness and legality, and withdrawal. The winner is the worst of each category and the winner will be the one who wins the most categories. Let’s see who comes out on top in today’s main event, RITALIN vs. METH!

ROUND 1: HEALTH EFFECTS

RITALIN

This amphetamine-like substance causes the same types of effects on the body as other forms of speed! Some symptoms include things like loss of appetite, insomnia, increased heart rate. When Ritalin is abused in larger doses, especially through different forms of ingestion like injection or snorting, it puts an even greater stress on the body, and as a result excessive trauma on the heart can be fatal.

SHORT-TERM EFFECTS

  • Loss of appetite
  • Increased heart rate
  • Increased blood pressure
  • Increased body temperature
  • Dilation of pupils
  • Disturbed sleep patterns
  • Nausea
  • Bizarre, erratic, sometimes violent behavior
  • Hallucinations
  • Hyper-excitability
  • Irritability
  • Panic and psychosis
  • Convulsions, seizures
  • Death from high doses

LONG-TERM EFFECTS

  • Permanent damage to blood vessels of heart and brain, high blood pressure leading to heart attacks, strokes and death
  • Liver, kidney and lung damage
  • Destruction of tissues in nose if sniffed
  • Respiratory (breathing) problems if smoked
  • Infectious diseases and abscesses if injected
  • Malnutrition, weight loss
  • Disorientation, apathy, confused exhaustion
  • Strong psychological dependence
  • Psychosis
  • Depression
  • Damage to the brain including strokes and possibly epilepsy

METH:

Now, once we get into these health effects, pay really close attention to the similarities between the two, and see how many of these are the same.

SHORT-TERM EFFECTS

  • Loss of appetite
  • Increased heart rate
  • Increased blood pressure
  • Increased body temperature
  • Dilation of pupils
  • Disturbed sleep patterns
  • Nausea
  • Bizarre, erratic, sometimes violent behavior
  • Hallucinations
  • Hyper-excitability
  • Irritability
  • Panic and psychosis
  • Convulsions, seizures
  • Death from high doses

LONG-TERM EFFECTS

  • Permanent damage to blood vessels of heart and brain, high blood pressure leading to heart attacks, strokes and death
  • Liver, kidney and lung damage
  • Destruction of tissues in nose if sniffed
  • Respiratory (breathing) problems if smoked
  • Infectious diseases and abscesses if injected
  • Malnutrition, weight loss
  • Severe tooth decay
  • Disorientation, apathy, confused exhaustion
  • Strong psychological dependence
  • Psychosis
  • Depression
  • Damage to the brain similar to Alzheimer’s disease, stroke and epilepsy
  • Collapse or death

ROUND 1 HEALTH EFFECTS: WINNER IS NEITHER IT IS A DRAW- In case you didn’t notice, the short-term AND long-term effects of the two are THE SAME!

ROUND 2 INSIDIOUSNESS AND LEGALITY

Meth:

Schedule II drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with a high potential for abuse, less abuse potential than Schedule I drugs such as marijuana, with use potentially leading to severe psychological or physical dependence. Meth is a Schedule II drug under the Controlled Substances Act. Meth has little to no insidiousness because it is well known in its effects and addictiveness. Most people have seen The Meth Project’s before and after photos of meth users either on TV, on billboards, on the internet or maybe even in their D.A.R.E class. Most people who end up smoking meth know the horrors and dangers of it but think either it can’t or won’t happen again. As some of us have heard before the saying “just once” is what most future meth addicts say. This doesn’t make meth insidious. Although on a little side note, I was kind of surprised to find out that Schedule II substance along with prescription narcotics. I don’t know if this is supposed to be saying meth isn’t that dangerous or that prescription narcotics are more dangerous than people like to think.

Ritalin:

Methylphenidate is a Schedule II controlled substance, and both production and distribution are designed to be tightly controlled. While Ritalin use has recently declined in the past few years, prescription patterns involving similar drugs such as Adderall have sky-rocketed, primarily due to the progression of the demand within the United States for ADD and ADHD medications. In 2005, 1.9 million U.S. prescriptions were written for Ritalin, while prescriptions for Adderall-XR and Concerta totaled out around 8.7 million and 8.2 million. During that same year, use of methylphenidate and dextroamphetamine figured into 7,873 emergency-room visits in the United States alone. The U.S. has the highest rate of both ADD diagnosis and methylphenidate use in the world, with an estimated 1.5 million U.S. children currently using some form of the drug daily, with millions more taking such other ADHD medications as Adderall and Concerta.  While there is little evidence of physical addiction to Ritalin when used under medical supervision and correctly dosed and monitored, it can produce both tolerance and physical addiction when used recreationally to get high.

THE WINNER OF ROUND 2 IS RITALIN- Ritalin takes the title as being more insidious than meth because it is legal and actually dealt out to children. The dangers of meth are well documented and meth is very illegal, while Ritalin is considered to be safe to the point you can find is in house-hold cabinets across the country, and parents giving them to their kids, often unaware of the dangerous effects that can result from the abuse of this substance.

ROUND 3 ADDICTIVENESS AND WITHDRAWAL

Meth:

Methamphetamine can be taken orally, smoked, snorted, or injected. The user will experience a sudden “rush” of pleasure directly after smoking or injecting the drug. This sensation only lasts for about a minute or two while the effects of meth can last from 30 minutes to 12 hours. Meth also has a high risk of dependency in users. If the user becomes dependent, they need more and more of the substance to feel the high. Methamphetamine withdrawal varies depending on the level of addiction and frequency of meth use.

  1. Depression

It can be very difficult to deal with the mental anguish that you obtain from meth. Withdrawal from methamphetamine has been associated with depression.

  1. Fatigue

Once an individual stops using meth they can become extremely tired. Without the artificial source of energy, the person begins to feel uncomfortable and deprived of energy.

  1. Changes in Heart Rhythm

Methamphetamine is a stimulant, and can cause irregular heartbeats. When the addict stops using the drug changes in heart rhythm may occur.

Ritalin:

Ritalin withdrawal symptoms are most likely to be felt if you are taking a large dose of this medication. If you take a low or moderate dose, you are less likely to feel withdrawal symptoms when you stop taking Ritalin. Slowly tapering off over time can reduce your symptoms. So although Ritalin withdrawal is generally not life threatening, it can be uncomfortable. It can be so uncomfortable that people may start taking the drug again in order to relieve the withdrawal symptoms. Even more terrifying is the fact that if a pregnant woman is taking Ritalin her baby may have withdrawal symptoms after it is born, and have already developed some level of physical dependency.

  1. Depression

Being without this medication after abusing it for long periods of time can create serious depression due to the lack of focus and energy, and the combination of other adverse health effects and withdrawal symptoms.

  1. Fatigue

Again, with the lack of this stimulant being present there can be a chemical imbalance created that causes discomfort and lack of energy or enthusiasm.

  1. Changes in Heart Rhythm

As mentioned in health effects of Ritalin, this stimulant effects the heart and blood pressure in the body, so when someone abusing Ritalin regularly stops abruptly their heart rhythm may change and become even more irregular.

THE WINNER OF ROUND 3 IS METH-

The reason Meth wins out on this round is because anyone using meth even on a regular basis can experience withdrawals, and they intensify depending on the frequency and the amount of usage. Ritalin has the same type of effects on the body with withdrawals, but it takes someone over-using or abusing this medication against doctors’ orders. No doctor prescribes meth for a good reason.

THE WINNER OF THE SUBSTANCE SHOWDOWN RITALIN VS. METH IS. . . (drum roll please)

!!!RITALIN!!!

Ritalin, the often under-estimated and over-looked under-dog takes this fight for one simple reason, it is LEGAL. When comparing the adverse health effects caused by these to drugs, and the withdrawal symptoms, they are practically reflections of each-other as stimulants. Ritalin may not have some of the deterioration effect on the outer appearance, or the reputation from TV and media, but the fact that when abused it does the same kind of damage as meth can on the body is relevant. Ritalin is still kept in homes everywhere while looked at as an innocent medication to aid with ADHD, and while it does help a lot of people with severe Attention Deficit, it can be easily abused. The fact alone that it can hurt people the same way meth can and yet thousands of Americans dose themselves and even their children with it every day puts it in the winner’s circle, but regardless when either drug is abused, we lose!

Check out our other Substance Showdown blogs:

Alcohol v. Marijuana

Ecstasy v. Molly

Heroin v. Prescription Painkillers

Powder Cocaine v. Crack

Many drugs have vastly different effects on the mind and the body, and some are more noticeably harmful than others, but the disease of addiction does not discriminate, no matter what the drug is! If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free 1-800-951-6135.

Legal Amphetamines vs. Illegal Methamphetamine: How much difference is there really?

(Legal) Amphetamines vs. (Illegal) Methamphetamine: How much difference is there really?

Other than a few extra, albeit foul, ingredients used to “cut” the final product, methamphetamine (illegal) and pharmaceutical – that is ‘legal’ – amphetamine are pretty closely related, chemically speaking. In fact, the only difference between the two boils down to one molecule that lets meth cross the blood-brain barrier a little faster, giving it that extra ‘kick.’ After that, meth breaks down fast into dextroamphetamine, the dominant salt in Adderall, which just so happens to be America’s leading ADHD drug and favorite study aid.

There are a whole slew of reasons behind the whole “good” amphetamine versus “bad” methamphetamine but, actual chemistry isn’t one of them. There is very little difference between Adderall and street speed that really comes down to politics and the almighty dollar. As you might have guessed, Big Pharma is mostly to blame.

In the earlier part of the twentieth century, Americans consumed a wide variety of patented amphetamines, from the bestselling Benzedrine, Dexedrine and Dexamyl, not to mention a number of generic versions of the drug. What’s noteworthy is that more than a few of these brands also contained methamphetamine.

The 1960s and the Original Speed Epidemic

Post-war era in America saw a boom in amphetamine use as it was widely marketed to housewives as a way to keep trim while keeping up with all of the grueling housework. Let’s face it, being a housewife is a lot of work, even though still today, it is highly under-valued.

However, also during this time, it became painfully clear that this trend of amphetamine use was causing all kinds of problems. In fact, researchers during the ‘60s concluded that habitual amphetamine use produced a more accurate “model psychosis” than LSD.

It was also during this period, what with the U.S. ‘speed’ market peaking at around four billion pills annually, that the then young field of neuroscience began to understand why pharmaceutical speed was so popular yet so dangerous. In the words of one scholar, “given access to enough amphetamine, any rat, monkey, or man would eventually self-destruct.”

The World Health Organization got involved at this point, given that America’s speed crisis was now at its height, and concluded that the dangers of amphetamine use far outweighed their benefits when it came to general medical practices. Indeed, every industrial nation agreed with the WHO’s assessment, including the United States, therefore changing the laws accordingly. This led to a virtual backlash when it came to speed that was prevalent in critical press, public outrage, and even Congressional hearings that led to the creation of limits on the production, marketing, and sale of amphetamines.

The 1970s and American Speed

By 1970, nearly 10% of American women were using or were dependent on some form of amphetamine, most of whom were prescribed the drug for its weight loss properties.

With all the criticism coming to the forefront, even appearing in the form of exposés in women’s magazines, high-profile hearings ensued. These led to the Controlled Substances Act and the classification of amphetamines as a Schedule II drug, defining it with having a high risk of addiction and potential for abuse. For the first time, federal limits were placed on annual speed production.

As you can imagine, there was quite a lot of industry (Big Pharma) resistance, which, with help from their friends in Congress, have led to the steady loosening in recent years of such restrictions. In fact, industry regulations are now more closely reminiscent of those predating the 1970s.

Current Legal Amphetamine Trends

In his book, on Running Ritalin, Dr. Lawrence Diller states that the use of legal speed has surpassed opiate addiction as the leading reason behind admissions to addiction treatment centers in California.

Currently, one-in-five teenage boys in the U.S. have received an ADHD diagnosis – a clear indication that the prescription amphetamine market is in full swing again – as this number is has nearly doubled since 2008. And the number of prescription speed users arriving at ER rooms and rehab facilities is growing at an alarming rate.

Legal speed in America is now a $10 billion market that accounts for more than four-fifths of the world’s pharmaceutical amphetamine. And, by the end of 2015, America’s speed consumption is projected to rise by another quarter.

What Does It All Mean?

The current speed explosion is eerily familiar. As they say, “history repeats itself” and, along with industry projections, it seems as though America’s new trendy pill will soon recreate the same situation we’ve seen in the past – one that will end just as badly.

Now that legal speed has made its comeback as a treatment for Attention Deficit Disorder, it’s the same epidemic, just with a new twist backed by so-called medical diagnoses. The Journal of Neuroscience published a study in which researchers wrote that amphetamine and methamphetamine, such as crystal meth, are “about equipotent” and “produce qualitatively similar behavioral responses.” Both excite the central nervous system in nearly identical ways. That is, the brain responds the same way whether it’s produced by Big Pharma or your friendly neighborhood ‘cook.’

Substance abuse isn’t limited to illicit drugs like crystal meth; even prescription speed such as Adderall, Ritalin, Vyvanse, or Dexedrine can pose a problem. If you or someone you love is being prescribed amphetamines and you feel that it has become a problem, help is available in the form of addiction specialists who are available to speak with you regarding amphetamine and methamphetamine use. If you’re unsure about what constitutes a problem, give Palm Partners a call at 1-800-951-6135.

Substance Showdown: Zubsolv vs. Suboxone

Substance Showdown: Zubsolv vs. Suboxone

Zubsolv is a new name-brand drug being used to treat opiate addiction. It is the same as its predecessor, Suboxone, in that it contains the same two drugs: buprenorphine and naloxone, and it is prescribed for the same reasons.

Buprenorphine/naloxone  

Drugs containing buprenorphine and naloxone are approved for treating of opiate withdrawal in people who are opiate-dependent. Buprenorphine is an opiate agonist that was originally developed to treat pain problems. Naloxone is an opiate blocker. Medications that contain both are used in addiction treatment because of the way they work: the medication binds to the opiate receptors in the brain, which is the same exact receptor that morphine, heroin and other opiates bind to. The addition of the blocker is to keep the patient from getting ‘high’ from the medication.

Substance Showdown: Zubsolv vs. Suboxone

Similarities:

  • Both are prescribed for the treatment of opiate dependence
  • Both contain the same two active ingredients: buprenorphine (the partial opiate agonist) and naloxone (the opiate blocker, also added in order to prevent abuse by injection)
  • Both are dissolve under your tongue (taken sublingually)
  • Both have the same duration – they are generally taken either once or twice daily

Substance Showdown: Zubsolv vs. Suboxone

Differences:

  • Taste – Suboxone has a citrus taste and Zubsolv has a mint-like taste (in at least one study, people preferred the taste and feel of Zubsolv over Suboxone)
  • Size and form – Zubsolv is a very small tablet, Suboxone comes as a film
  • Absorption – perhaps one of the biggest differences as far as treatment goes, is that Zubsolv has better bioavailability, meaning that it is designed in such a way that the body can absorb it better.

Substance Showdown: Zubsolv vs. Suboxone

Because of the last aforementioned difference, another way in which Suboxone and Zubsolv differ is in their dosing. Since your body can more effectively absorb and make use of the buprenorphine in Zubsolv, the tablets contain slightly less of the active ingredients. With Suboxone tablets and films, the dosages are 2mg/0.5mg and 8mg/2mg buprenorphine/naloxone whereas Zubsolv comes in 1.4mg/0.36mg and 5.7mg/1.4mg. Though the tablet contains less medication, due to Zubsolv’s better bioavailability, your body gets the same useful amount.

Zubsolv is an “advanced sublingual tablet formulation” that “offers higher bioavailability relative to the tablet.” Basically, this means that more of the drug reaches your bloodstream, which then allow you to take a lower daily dose, because that is all you technically need.

Substance Showdown: Zubsolv vs. Suboxone

The truth of the matter is, when either Suboxone or Zubsolv is used for long-term maintenance, rather than for short-term treatment to alleviate withdrawal symptoms, you will continue to be dependent on a substance. Just like when you were using other opiates for which you are now taking (or considering taking) Suboxone or Zubsolv, you can’t simply quit cold turkey – you will also experience withdrawal symptoms. Again, these medications contain a partial opiate.

In both cases, Suboxone and Zubsolv, the medication is a prescription that is used to treat people who are addicted to opioid drugs, such as prescription painkillers or illicit drugs such as heroin. And, they are best used as part of a complete treatment program that also includes counseling and behavioral therapy in order to recover and achieve long-term sobriety.

If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, or is on Suboxone maintenance or is considering Zubsolv treatment, please call toll-free 1-800-951-6135.

 

 

Sources:

http://www.zubsolv.com/

http://www.choosehelp.com/topics/drug-rehab/suboxone-in-drug-rehab-a-more-humane-detox-off-of-heroin-or-pain-pills

The 10 Best Palm Partners Blogs of 2013

The 10 Best Palm Partners Blogs of 2013

As the year comes to a close, let’s take a look at 2013 in blogs. Here, we count down to the best blog of the year in this list of the 10 best Palm Partners blogs of 2013 as chosen by you, our dedicated readers!

#10: Natasha Lyonne Channels Her Inner Junkie on ‘Orange is the New Black’

Lyonne stars in the Netflix’s smash hit “Orange is the New Black,” which premiered in July. The critically acclaimed show is already garnering a very large following.

“I certainly think that my personal experience gave me a lot of access to my character’s internal world,” Lyonne tells The Post. “She’s not too different from me. She comes from a pretty good home, not a ton of financial difficulty, but still with its own dysfunction.”

(interesting side note:  at one point in the “Orange is the New Black”, we see a huge scar on Lyonne’s chest from a heart surgery her character received related to her drug abuse. In reality, she actually had that exact surgery and that scar is real.)

Read more here:

http://blog.palmpartners.com/natasha-lyonne-channels-her-inner-junkie-on-orange-is-the-new-black/

#9: History of Drug Abuse: The 80’s

The ‘80s might as well have been called the “cocaine ‘80s.”

Faced with dropping prices for their illegal product, drug dealers made a decision to convert the powder to “crack,” a solid smoke able form of cocaine that could be sold in smaller quantities, to more people. It was cheap, simple to produce, ready to use, and highly profitable for dealers to develop.

Crack first began to be used on a large scale in Los Angeles in 1984. The distribution and use of the drug exploded that same year. By the end of 1986, it was available in 28 states and the District of Columbia.

Read more about cocaine and the crack epidemic here:

http://blog.palmpartners.com/history-of-drug-abuse-the-80s/

#8: 5 Ways to Stop Being Codependent

Ask yourself:

Do you keep quiet to avoid arguments? Are you always worried about others’ opinions of you? Have you ever lived with someone with an alcohol or drug problem? Are the opinions of others more important than your own? Do you feel rejected when significant others spend time with friends?

You may be codependent if you answered “yes” to any of these. One of the 5 ways to stop being codependent is to set and maintain healthy boundaries.

Here’s how: http://blog.palmpartners.com/5-ways-to-stop-being-codependent/

#7: Drug Myths Debunked: Heroin

What many people know about heroin is from what they see portrayed on television. Heroin and heroin users are surrounded by a cloud of hysteria, horrific media, and quick judgment. We are here to set the record straight. Because while heroin, yes, is very dangerous and addictive, some of what you may or may not know about this drug and its users are myth not fact.

For instance, many people think that heroin is more dangerous than alcohol.

This, in fact, is false. Heroin is not more dangerous than alcohol. In reality, alcohol is just as dangerous as heroin. The truth is alcohol in a lot of ways is even more dangerous than heroin. Alcohol just happens to be more socially accepted.

Don’t believe us? Read more here: http://blog.palmpartners.com/drug-myths-debunked-heroin/

#6: Can my employer fire me for going to rehab?

Many addicts and alcoholics are ignorant about their own rights. The truth is that while addicts will have plenty to worry about if they quality of their work declines due to drug and alcohol use, those who are willing to get help are protected under two federal laws: the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Family and Medical Leave act.

Learn more about your rights here:

http://blog.palmpartners.com/can-my-employer-fire-me-for-going-to-rehab/

#5: Substance Showdown: Bath Salts vs. Meth

Most of us are familiar with The Meth Project which has brought us the train-wreck images that exemplify “meth mouth.” So, what about bath salts? Well, bath salts gained notoriety pretty quick due to the little incident of one man eating another man’s face that gave every zombie fan everywhere something to worry about. Luckily, last year’s cannibalism was a false alarm on the zombie apocalypse even though all the warnings about bath salts weren’t and well meth is still going steady as it always has.

Find out which drug ranks as the worst here:

http://blog.palmpartners.com/substance-showdown-bath-salts-vs-meth/

#4: Parent’s Guide to Drug Abuse: Drug Paraphernalia

Most parents are uneducated in what’s going on in the “streets” and the terms being used to refer to drugs and drug paraphernalia.

So what is drug paraphernalia? And, where can your kids get drug paraphernalia?

Find out more here: http://blog.palmpartners.com/parents-guide-to-drug-abuse-drug-paraphernalia/

#3: 13 Worst Sobriety Tattoos Ever

I would recommend waiting until you have a little bit of sober time under your belt before you go out and get permanent ink on your body, or don’t. It is entirely up to you, just remember that getting tattoos removed is SUPER expensive!

Here are some serious sobriety tattoo fails:

http://blog.palmpartners.com/13-worst-sobriety-tattoos-ever/

#2: Everyday Things that Can Make You Fail a Drug Test

Anyone who has ever had a false positive on a drug test knows the frustration and stress it can cause. You find yourself in defense mode knowing you did nothing wrong and yet the test clearly shows you failed for THC, PCP, meth, whatever it is. How do you combat with scientific proof?

Here is a list of everyday things that can make you fail a drug test:

http://blog.palmpartners.com/everyday-things-that-can-make-you-fail-a-drug-test/

And the top Palm Partners blog of 2013 is…

#1: Your Face on Drugs: Cocaine

The infamous coke bloat…the best way to describe this is really just to tell you to google images for “Kate Moss.” Throughout the years, her face has undergone many a transformation – and we’re not talking about the usual celebrity plastic surgery. No, Kate Moss’ face has been dealt a brutal blow from well, blow. Other than the obvious accelerated signs of aging, Moss’ face has taken on the uneven puffiness that is characteristic of faces of cocaine addicts.

Read more details about how cocaine distorts your face here:

http://blog.palmpartners.com/your-face-on-drugs-cocaine/

If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free 1-800-951-6135.

Substance Showdown: Benzodiazepines vs. Barbiturates

Substance Showdown: Benzodiazipines vs. Barbiturates

Today’s showdown is between two “downers”: benzodiazepines and barbiturates. Benzodiazepines and barbiturates are the most commonly abused prescriptions in the tranquilizer and sedative drug class. These medications, often referred to as Central Nervous System or CNS depressants, are generally used to treat disorders related to sleep and anxiety. Barbiturates and benzodiazepines decrease brain activity causing the person to feel more calm, drowsy, and/or peaceful.

Just like our other substance showdowns, benzodiazepines and barbiturates will go head to head in three rounds based on: health effects, insidiousness and legality as well as withdrawal. The worst of each round will be the winner. The substance with the most rounds won will be the overall winner and declared the more dangerous of the two. LET THE SUBSTANC SHOWDOWN BEGIN!

ROUND 1 Health Effects

Benzodiazepines

•Diazepam (Valium)

•Chlordizapoxide HCI (Librium)

•Alprazolam (Xanax)

•Triazolam (Halcion)

•Estazolam (ProSom)

Side effects of benzodiazepine may include:

  • Drowsiness
  • Confusion
  • Dizziness
  • Trembling
  • Impaired coordination
  • Vision problems
  • Grogginess
  • Feelings of depression
  • Headache
  • Risks

Benzodiazepines are also physically addictive. The withdrawal symptoms of benzodiazepines include trouble sleeping, feelings of depression and sweating.  If someone has become dependent on a benzodiazepine it is crucial that they do not suddenly stop therapy cold turkey. Stopping cold turkey can result in life threatening seizures, tremors, and muscle cramps. Therefore, it is important to taper off benzodiazepines very slowly with professional help.

Barbiturates

  • Bleeding sores on lips
  • Chest pain
  • Fever
  • Muscle or joint pain
  • Red, thickened, or scaly skin
  • Skin rash or hives
  • Sores, ulcers, or white spots in mouth (painful)
  • Sore throat and/or fever
  • Swelling of eyelids, face, or lips
  • Wheezing or tightness in chest
  • Confusion
  • Mental depression
  • Unusual excitement
  • Rare
  • Hallucinations (seeing, hearing, or feeling things that are not there)
  • Unusual bleeding or bruising
  • Unusual tiredness or weakness

With long-term or chronic use

  • Bone pain, tenderness, or aching
  • Loss of appetite
  • Muscle weakness
  • Weight loss
  • Yellow eyes or skin

WINNER OF ROUND 1 IS BARBITURATES

ROUND 2 LEGALITY AND INSIDIOUSNESS

Benzodiazepines

Benzodiazepines are controlled in schedule IV of the Controlled Substance Act.  Benzodiazepines are only legally available through prescription. Many abusers maintain their drug supply by getting prescriptions from several doctors, forging prescriptions, or buying them illicitly. Alprazolam and diazepam are the two most frequently encountered benzodiazepines on the illicit market. Benzodiazepines are very insidious due to the fact that are simply a prescription drugs and in the present day as well as in the past have been frequently prescribed to anyone with even slight anxiety. Most people who get prescriptions to benzodiazepines have no idea that the addictive potential of these drugs and just like with prescription painkillers; after a period of time will not be able to stop taking the drugs without getting very sick. In fact, benzodiazepines are so dangerously addictive that trying to suddenly stop taking the drugs after becoming physically addicted, could be fatal. This makes benzodiazepines very insidious and their legality and prescription from a doctor just make them doubly so.

Barbiturates

Barbiturates are Schedule II, III, and IV under the Controlled Substances Act. Barbiturates are a prescription-only medicine and a class B controlled drug (Schedules 2 and 3). This indicates that it is illegal to possess the drug without a prescription or to supply it to others. Injectable barbiturates are class A drugs. For possession of barbiturates injections the maximum penalty is seven years imprisonment and/or unlimited fine. For dealing in these injectable barbiturates there may be life sentence and/or unlimited fine. For possession of barbiturates capsules the maximum penalty is five years imprisonment and/or unlimited fine. For dealing in these capsule barbiturates there may be 14 years imprisonment and/or unlimited fine. Barbiturates are rarely prescribed these days and are used more for general anesthesia before surgery etc. Benzodiazepines have replaced barbiturates as the more commonly prescribed sedative. Barbiturates are just as highly addictive as benzodiazepines but are not as commonly prescribed which only makes them slightly insidious. Most people will be prescribed a benzodiazepine before a barbiturate if they are prescribed a barbiturate at all. Barbiturates are still insidious for those who do get prescribed to them for the same reasons benzodiazepines are.

THE WINNER OF ROUND 2 IS BENZODIAZEPINE

ROUND 3 WITHDRAWAL

Benzodiazepine withdrawal emerges when a person who has taken benzodiazepines has developed a physical dependence lowers their dose or stop taking the medication all together. It is characterized by often severe sleep disturbance, irritability, increased tension and anxiety, panic attacks, hand tremor, sweating, difficulty in concentration, confusion and cognitive difficulty, memory problems, dry retching and nausea, weight loss, palpitations, headache, muscular pain and stiffness, a host of perceptual changes, hallucinations, seizures, psychosis, and suicide.

Someone who is addicted to barbiturates will begin to feel acute withdrawal symptoms within 8-16 hours after the last dose. Symptoms can be present for as long as 15 days and are most severe at the beginning of withdrawal. Barbiturates withdrawal symptoms can include restlessness, insomnia, weakness, dizziness, nausea, sweating and anxiety. There may be tremors, seizures, hallucinations and psychosis. Users may become hostile and violent. Without proper treatment, hyperthermia, circulatory failure, and death can result.

ROUND 3 IS A DRAW Both benzodiazepines and barbiturates have a dangerous and painful withdrawal.

AND THE WINNER OF THE SUBSTANCE SHOWDOWN: benzodiazepines vs. barbiturates is. . . BENZODIAZEPINES. Due to benzodiazepines insidiousness it is our winner. Not only our benzodiazepines insidious because of their legality but also because they can be found in many American’s medicines cabinets and are used frequently by teens as well as adults. Benzodiazepines are highly dangerous and highly addictive. This makes benzodiazepines the winner of this fight.

 

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