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All across this country in small towns, rural areas and cities, alcoholism and drug abuse are destroying the lives of men, women and their families. Where to turn for help? What to do when friends, dignity and perhaps employment are lost?

The answer is Palm Partners Recovery Center. It’s a proven path to getting sober and staying sober.

Palm Partners’ innovative and consistently successful treatment includes: a focus on holistic health, a multi-disciplinary approach, a 12-step recovery program and customized aftercare. Depend on us for help with:

Dialectical Behavioral Therapy: Selena Gomez Says DBT Changed Her Life

Dialectical Behavioral Therapy: The Therapy Selena Gomez Says Changed Her Life

(This content is being used for illustrative purposes only; any person depicted in the content is a model)

Author: Shernide Delva

Recently, a form of therapy has garnered massive media attention. It is known as Dialectical Behavioral Therapy or DBT. Even Selena Gomez said it changed her life. Around August of last year, Gomez abruptly ended her Revival tour to recover from “anxiety, panic attacks, and depression,” she states was a result of her lupus condition. She says DBT specifically, allowed her to relearn the coping tools she desperately needed.

But what is DBT?

Dialectical behavioral therapy is a type of cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy used to treat multiple types of mental health disorders. The theory behind the approach is that certain people are prone to react in an intense manner toward certain emotional situations, primarily those found in romantic, family or friend relationships. Often, DBT is used to treat patients with borderline personality disorder or bipolar disorder.

DBT suggests certain people have a higher sensitivity to emotional stimuli. Their emotions tend to spike more quickly than the average person. Because of this, it takes time for them to recover emotionally after experiencing these spikes in emotions.

For example, people with borderline personality disorder struggle with extreme swings in their emotions. They see the world in black-and-white shades, and always jump from one crisis to another. Those around them do not understand their reactions, so this isolates their behavior even more. They lack the coping strategies of dealing with their high surges in emotion. That’s where DBT comes in. DBT teaches them to handle their emotions better.

DBT in three formats:

  • Support-oriented:

    DBT focuses on helping a person identify their strengths and build on them so they can feel better about themselves and their future.

  • Cognitive-Based:

    DBT helps with identifying the thoughts, beliefs, and assumptions that make life harder. For example, the need for perfectionism is a common theme in many people’s lives. The need to be perfect may prevent someone from succeeding entirely. Therefore, DBT helps people acquire new ways of thinking that makes life more bearable. Another common emotion is anger. A person may feel if they get angry, it is their fault, and they are a horrible person. DBT teaches that anger is a natural human emotion.

  • Collaborative:

    DBT works in a collaborative environment. Patients are encouraged to work out any relationship conflicts they may have with their therapist and therapists are told to do the same. DBT asks patients to complete homework assignments, role-play and practice coping skills. Then, the individual therapist works one-on-one with the patient to help them master their DBT skills.

Typically, dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) has two main components:

  1. Individual weekly psychotherapy sessions:

    These emphasize problem-solving behaviors for the past week’s issues and troubles that arose in a person’s life. Any self-injurious or suicidal behaviors take priority, followed by any problems that could interfere with the therapy process. The weekly sessions in DBT focus on decreasing and dealing with post-traumatic stress response from previous trauma and helping a person enhance their self-worth.

  2. Weekly group therapy sessions:

    A trained DBT therapist will lead sessions where people learn skills related to interpersonal effectiveness, distress tolerance/reality acceptance skills, emotion regulation, and mindfulness skills.

The Four Modules of Dialectical Behavior Therapy

Furthermore, there are four modules of dialectical behavioral therapy. They focus on:

  • Emotion Regulation:

    Individuals who are suicidal or borderline struggle with emotional intensity. They benefit in learning how to regulate their emotions. Furthermore, DBT teaches skills for emotional regulation such as:

    • Identifying and labeling emotions
    • Identifying obstacles to changing emotions
    • Reducing vulnerability to “emotion mind.”
    • Increasing positive emotional events
    • Increasing mindfulness to current emotions
    • Taking opposite action
  • Distress Tolerance:

    Lastly, this area approaches mental health by changing distressing events and circumstances. Individuals learn to bear pain skillfully. They learn to accept themselves and the current situation. While the focus is on nonjudgmental thinking, this does not mean they must approve of the reality: “Acceptance of reality is not approval of reality.”

  • Interpersonal Effectiveness:

    This principle focuses on asking what one needs and learning to say no. It also emphasizes coping with interpersonal conflict. Those with borderline personality disorder usually have good interpersonal skills. They may lack the skills necessary for generating or analyzing their personal circumstances. This part of DBT focuses on applying coping skills in their particular situation.

  • Mindfulness:

    In DBT, patients learn the core principles of mindfulness.  The focus is on emphasizing what tasks are necessary to practice core mindfulness skills. Furthermore, this area concentrates on the “how” skills and allows the individual to incorporate mindfulness into their daily lives.


Therapy is an essential tool in early recovery. Whether you are struggling with addiction or mental illness, it is crucial to take the first step in transforming your life. Do not feel ashamed if you are currently battling a mental illness or addiction. Instead, take charge of your life by seeking the assistance of professionals. We are waiting for your call. Do not wait. Call today.

   CALL NOW 1-800-951-6135

Crazy News Stories: Meth Smuggling Monk, Bad TSA Employees, And More

Crazy News Stories: Meth Smuggling Monk, Bad TSA Employees, And More

(This content is being used for illustrative purposes only; any person depicted in the content is a model)

Author: Shernide Delva

Guess what’s back? Back again? Crazy news stories, of course!
The year 2017 is still fresh, but some of the stories to come out recently are so crazy, we just had to talk about them. We hope these stories give you some insight into addiction and remind you why it is so important to reach out if you need help in your recovery.

Here are some crazy news stories stemming from the New Year:

  • Woman in Labor Demanded Friend Inject Her With Heroin and Meth

This story is both ridiculous and just plain sad. Most women in labor want support from their friends and family.  Felicia Farruggia, 29, wanted drugs. Farruggia went into labor at her home and demanded her friend inject her with heroin and methamphetamines before the firefighters and ambulance arrived. The even crazier part of the story is that her friend actually gave them to her.

Her friend, Rhianna Frennete, 37, was arrested for obliging with the request. Both face charges of felony reckless conduct. Frennete faces a misdemeanor count of the same offense. Police arrested Farruggia this week, and the baby is currently in state custody.

“This case is just, honestly, absolutely appalling in my mind,” Lieutenant Sean Ford said. “No one died, but the risk to that child and to the mother. … This stuff is just getting out of control.”

Police state Frenette used an unsanitary syringe to inject Farruggia at least once before she was successful. Following the injection, Farruggia’s boyfriend called 911. Shortly after firefighters arrive, Farruggia gave birth while entering the ambulance.

  • TSA Employees Arrested for Cocaine Smuggling in Puerto Rico

TSA employees are responsible for ensuring our safety while flying. However, over a dozen TSA employees in Puerto Rico were more concerned with smuggling cocaine.  It was a massive operation, the U.S. Attorney’s Office announced.

The defendants are accused of helping to smuggle close to 20 tons of cocaine through Luis Muñoz Marín International Airport over the course of 18 years, from 1998 to 2016. The investigation was launched by the TSA in an effort to target employee misconduct and reduce insider threats. The investigation discovered that employees would smuggle suitcases through TSA checkpoints at the airports and onto flights.

  • Buddhist Monk Busted For Hiding Over 4.2 Million Meth Pills In Monastery

The country of Myanmar is cracking down on drug trafficking, and not even monks are safe.  While Myanmar is one of the most Buddhist nations in the world, it is also Southeast Asia’s largest narcotics producer. Therefore it should not be too shocking that the two come together every now and then. Last month, police discovered a stash of more than four million methamphetamine pills hidden within the inconspicuous Shwe Baho monastery.

How it happened: After receiving a tip, police found Monk Arsara, a respected leader at the monastery, driving towards Bangladesh transporting some 400,000 meth tablets, as well as hundreds of dollars’ worth of local currency in his car. The police then visited the monastery and discovered another 4.2 million pills, along with a grenade and some other ammunition. The pills are worth more than $4 million USD on the street.  That’s not very monk-like to me. Can you say Na-meth-tay?

  • Neanderthals may have self-medicated long before pills existed

Finally, we will end on a throwback. Like wayyy back. Turns out, Neanderthals were not so different from us after all.  A new study found that when they were in pain, they also self-medicated. Researchers found evidence that a Neanderthal treated a dental abscess with medicinal plants, highlighting an ability to seek pain relief long before pills came into existence. The researchers specifically study Neanderthals in Spain. One of the two Neanderthals from Spain appeared to have used plants to treat his painful dental pain. Plaque from his teeth showed he was eating poplar, which contains the active ingredient of aspirin. These findings contradict past studies which suggested Neanderthals had a very simple existence.

Can you blame them, though? Dental pain is the absolute worse!


So there you have it, folks. Crazy news stories are fascinating and sometimes funny, but they also highlight how insane addiction can be. What story stood out to you? If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free.

   CALL NOW 1-800-951-6135

4 Questions on Self-Love VS Narcissism

4 Questions of Self-Love VS Narcissism

(This content is being used for illustrative purposes only; any person depicted in the content is a model)

Author: Justin Mckibben

Narcissism is a word that gets thrown around a lot these days. The “selfie society” that exists in a world of social media has some people saying we are more concerned with ourselves than ever. The new heightened sense of self-promotion causes many to feel we have become less interested in true connection with others. The truth is, there is nothing wrong with healthy self-love. Some may see it as simply embarking on self-exploration and celebration. Others may see it as self-seeking and being conceded. Are you more conscious, or are you pretentious? Are you introspective or disconnected?

At times the distinction becomes blurred, and that might not be your fault. Sometimes others will perceive us differently and it’s not our responsibility to change their minds. Sometimes people are afraid to give themselves the self-love they need because they don’t want to seem self-centered, but isn’t there a strong difference between self-love and narcissism?

True Narcissism

Let us be clear; narcissists seem to love themselves to an extreme, with the exclusion of others. This is often considered as a feature of a mental health disorder and includes an excessive interest in one’s self, especially physical appearances. It is the pursuit of gratification from vanity or egotistic admiration of one’s own attributes.

If you were to look up the definition of narcissism, you would probably find it also described as a social or cultural problem. It is a factor in trait theory used in various self-report inventories of personality.

Narcissism is most typically considered an issue in an individual’s or group’s relationships with self and others.

Egocentrism

Let us also be clear that narcissism is not the same as egocentrism. It is true that both egocentrism and narcissism appear comparable. However there is a distinct difference.

Much like a narcissist, a person who is egocentric believes they are the center of attention. However, this individual does not receive gratification by one’s own admiration, as the narcissist does. In other words, the egocentric individual must receive validation and admiration from outside itself, so the self-love aspect is not so much an issue from the egocentric perspective.

Self-Love

Self-love is being more subject to the broad-stroke of “narcissism” over time, but should be viewed in a different light. For example, two forms of narcissism are not considered to be as detrimental:

  • Primary Narcissism

Freud suggested that, simply put, the desire and energy that drives one’s instinct to survive is something he dubbed primary narcissism. This sense of self-preservation is supposedly ingrained in everyone as a sense of self that protects us, without abandoning empathy or loving others.

  • Healthy Self-love

The “healthy narcissist” can be characterized as possessing realistic self-esteem without being cut off from a shared emotional life. This expression of self-love, or “health narcissism,” is about having a honest appraisal of ones worth, and still valuing others.

All of this brings us back to the question; How can we love ourselves in a way that feels good and enhances the quality of our lives, but isn’t narcissistic?

Research finds four consistent differences between healthy self-love and narcissistic love. Take a look at these 4 questions that can help you with self-love vs narcissism.

  1. Do I need to be validated by others?

Narcissists need the validation of others; it is a primary motive for a lot of their actions. A true narcissist craves constant affirmation. They need to be verified by others because they haven’t created a self-sustaining sense of worthiness or self-compassion. They may seem to hold themselves highly, however they have no genuine instinct of high self-regard.

The narcissist will do things to win praise and recognition. They seek materials as tools to measure their own worthiness. Even the people they develop relationships with are possessions they use as a means of validation.

Healthy self-love is fundamentally different in the sense of measuring self-worth. With health self-love, an individual’s internal values are a primary influence of their actions. They behave in a way that is consistent with those values, and these convictions help to sustain their good feelings about themselves.

In other words, basing your self-worth on your beliefs, instead of what others may believe about you, is self-love.

  1. Am I focusing on my appearance or my performance?

This isn’t just for the sake of aesthetics either. It ties right into the last question.

A true narcissist will often make a great actor. They play many parts, such as:

  • Caring friend
  • Devoted lover
  • Good employee

But they are better at keeping up appearances than actually performing the role with expertise and aptitude. Like when an action movie hero does well at looking like they beat up a room full of ninjas, but in reality they have CGI and stunt doubles.

A narcissist doesn’t invest too much emotionally in the actual quality of their performance. They don’t mind how their role as a friend or lover actually impact the other person, they just want to make it look good, especially if other people are looking. It is another form of validation.

People with authentic self-love take real care in doing a good job and taking responsibility for their part in things, particularly in relationships. So it is very acceptable to be concerned with your contribution to relationships and how you impact others, because in a way you earn your own self-love from the way you treat others.

  1. Am I focusing on comparison or compassion?

Another huge piece of this puzzle is comparison. How do you perceive others in contrast to yourself?

Typically, narcissists are not self-loving or secure in their worth. Because of this, they often seek to compare ourselves with others. Now this isn’t especially exclusive to full-blown narcissism, because we all have a tendency to try and measure up.

But the narcissist will thrive on the belief that they are better than, or even the best. We all feel better about ourselves when we are accomplished or exceptional at something, but to require to always outshine others is a little more relevant to narcissism. The focus here isn’t so much on us being able to appreciate our own achievement as much as it is the need for other people to be less. In order for a narcissist to be more, other people have to be beneath them. It isn’t self-worth; it is self-inflation through the dispossession of others.

Healthy self-love and self-esteem is based on believing that we have a number of positive qualities, and that other people have such qualities. It puts us on a more level playing field and allows us to be compassionate whether or not someone is as accomplished in something as we are. So it is OK to excel at something, as long as you don’t make it about other people being less.

  1. Do emotions and attitudes seem “black and white?”

We have mentioned before the real dangers of black and white thinking. In the words of the great Obi-Wan Kenobi,

“Only a Sith deals in absolutes.”

Basically, the issue is that some people only let it be one of two ways. It has to be black or white, no room for grey area or compromise.

Research indicates a narcissists tends to either love or hate things. They don’t to tolerate the middle ground. Usually, something with themselves or others is either preferable and exceptional or totally unacceptable. They are either everything or nothing, instead of just letting it be.

As a result, when we can’t abide our own uncomfortable feelings, we’re more likely to project them onto others. Once we force those feelings onto others we create conflict, isolation, and self-disillusionment.

Healthy self-love allows us to tolerate uncertainty. It is important to have self-love because with a strong sense of self-love we have the ability to experience our own vulnerability. Where a narcissist feels angry or intolerant of their own vulnerability, a healthy, self-loving person will naturally resort to self-compassion. This same compassion for ourselves gives us a chance to feel more connected to others.

So don’t look at self-compassion as “letting yourself off the hook,” look at it as accepting your imperfections with humility.

Recovery is Self-Love

At the end of the day, what is the moral of the story here?

Is it OK to just assume that people who have a high opinion of themselves, who believe in their own capacity to be unique and successful, and who value and respect their own impact on other people should be considered narcissists? Should the term “healthy narcissist” be something we swap for self-love once in a while to consider it as a virtue?

In recovery we hear a lot about how addicts and alcoholics are especially selfish. As often as we are told this, should we also be reminded to use our own nature as selfish people in recovery to shape that sense of self into something more constructive and empowering instead of thinking we need to abandon it completely?

Let us not be so quick to label one another as narcissists, and learn to love ourselves thoroughly as we learn again to love each other.

Mental health and self-esteem is extremely important in regards to addiction recovery. Holistic treatment programs like Palm Partners are specifically designed to address unique issues in unique ways. If you or someone you love is struggling, please call toll-free now. We want to help.

   CALL NOW 1-800-951-6135

Instagram App Offering Mental Health Intervention

Instagram App Offering Mental Health Intervention

(This content is being used for illustrative purposes only; any person depicted in the content is a model)

Author: Justin Mckibben

Social media and online networking are such a relevant aspect of our world today. With entire enterprises rising from online marketing, and children carrying smartphones, technology continues to be integrated into all areas of life by leaps and bounds. So with social media being utilized for basically every purpose, from personal to business, it is no surprise that some forward thinkers continue to find ways to put these all-encompassing outlets to good use.

Though stunning selfies full of filters, scenes of nature with inspiring quotes, and aesthetically perfect pictures of food dominate the Instagram app, the social media site isn’t void of some damaging content. Instagram is still used as a platform for some questionable photos, like pro-anorexia and pro-self-harm posts.

To fight back Instagram is now launching a new tool that allows users to issues. But they don’t stop there. The Instagram app also steps in to offer intervention options.

Instagram App VS Eating Disorders

The Instagram app already actively takes a stand on promoting positive mental health in some areas. It tried in 2012 to put a stop to pro-eating disorder posts. Often hashtags like #thinspiration and #ana are attached to these posts, so to prevent these tags from attracting admiration, the Instagram app tried to make these tags unsearchable. They also disabled accounts and added content advisories.

Some hashtags are banned completely, such as:

  • #thinspo, short for the pro-anorexia phrase “thinspiration”
  • #proana, another pro-anorexia phrase

Still, other potentially problematic tags fall into a gray area and are still allowed. The Instagram app had to witness the issue head-on when researchers examined 2.5 million posts between 2011 and 2014, also analyzing 15 pro-eating disorder hashtags that were banned or moderated. What they found was truly disheartening. For each banned/moderated hashtag, there was an average of 40 spin-off hashtags.

For example:

  • #anorexia, as banned, there were 99 variations of the hashtag, such as- #anorexique or #anoexica
  • #thighgap had variations of #thygap and #thigh gap
  • #bulimia would be transformed into #bulimiah

According to the study, these variations even boasted more comments and more “likes” than the originals. So when the Instagram app tried to shut down the pro-eating disorder exploitation of their forum, users found loop-holes. Spin-off hashtags are also noted to exhibit a higher focus of self-harm related posts.

The Instagram app was trying to make a difference, but the fight evolved with their efforts. It is time to implement new strategies.

Instagram’s #Intervention

Now the Instagram app is putting some of the power to act in the hands of other users. Users can now anonymously flag posts about self-harm or other mental health issues, and Instagram will step in.

But Instagram isn’t militantly and automatically shutting down every post that gets flagged. Instead, the Instagram app is taking a compassionate and proactive approach. Once a picture is flagged, the user who put up the image will see a message offering help:

“Someone saw one of your posts and thinks you might be going through a difficult time. If you need support, we’d like to help.”

Then, the app will offer to connect them with a helpline, assistance in talking to a friend or getting tips. If Instagram app users search any of those questionable tags, they’ll also be directed to the same support page.

#MentalHealthMatters

Instagram developed the new tool in dexterity by uniting with a variety of resources, including:

  • National Eating Disorders Association
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

They even reached out to real people who have struggled with eating disorders, self-harm and suicidal thoughts personally to come up with the most effective and compassionate message. Instagram COO Marne Levine said in a recent interview that,

“We listen to mental health experts when they tell us that outreach from a loved one can make a real difference for those who may be in distress. At the same time, we understand friends and family often want to offer support but don’t know how best to reach out,”

“These tools are designed to let you know that you are surrounded by a community that cares about you, at a moment when you might most need that reminder.”

In this writer’s opinion, this is an awesome innovation. This doesn’t attack the individual making the post, but instead offers support and displays concern in a positive light. Not to say there is anything wrong with banning hashtags or other methods of regulating social media. This just seems like it does not isolate the individual as much, and instead shows someone who may be suffering care and kindness. Instead of silencing a cry for help or sweeping it under the rug, it puts a solution on the table.

This kind of intervention by the Instagram app not only tries to protect those who may be susceptible to the negative impact of these images, it also promotes mental health solutions through positive outreach.

Well done Instagram.

Eating disorders and other mental health disorders are often co-occurring with addiction or substance abuse. Understanding dual diagnosis and providing holistic treatment can be very essential for effective and lasting recovery. If you or someone you love is struggling, please don’t wait. Call toll-free and find out how to get help.

   CALL NOW 1-800-951-6135

Social Media Strikes the Stigma Out of Suicide

Social Media Strikes the Stigma Out of Suicide

(This content is being used for illustrative purposes only; any person depicted in the content is a model)

Author: Justin Mckibben

Depression, social media and suicide. These words have a relationship that might not seem obvious all at once, but one that’s been getting some attention recently. However maybe it’s time that social media’s positive influence on the status of suicide and stigma be brought to the public. While it is true that scrolling through status updates and obsessing over ‘likes’, shares and comments is nothing short of unhealthy, is it possible Facebook is helping eliminate stigma from depression?

Megan Moreno is a physician at the Social Media and Adolescent Health Research Team (SMAHRT) at Seattle Children’s Hospital. She recently wrote recently about her own experience and opinions regarding the connection of depression to the status of social media, and the relevance of that connection in our socitey. She even nodded to the history of depression as a stigmatizing illness, and discussed that shame and misunderstanding at some of its ugliest moments; in the family.

One of the clearest and most important distinctions I believe Moreno made in her article was that stigma is one of the leading causes of the most severe and tragic side-effects of depression; suicide. Far too many people all over the world have resorted to the most extreme forms of escaping their emotional emptiness, such as self-mutilation or taking their own lives.

While some have speculated that social media has made a large contribution to continued depression, Moreno goes on to note that there has been a recent, subtle but effective shift in stigma has taken place largely online, in such shared spaces for social media including:

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • YouTube

In this study the researchers from the Pew Internet and American Life Project found that young adults and adolescents used Facebook up to above 80% in most studies.

Facebook Post-Pattern-Depression

During a study on the patterns of college students sharing posts related to drinking on Facebook, a researcher noticed references on a Facebook profile to depression. Throughout the research team members noticed displayed depression symptoms, and after several instances where this was pointed out it became apparent this was not mistake.

The researchers immediately launched a new study to evaluate patterns of depression symptoms being posted on Facebook. The symptoms they referred back to were defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) in order to collect definitive data.

The team examined the Facebook profiles of 200 college students for 1 year, and at one point Moreno was shocked to have noted that out of 200 Facebook profiles being referenced, about 25% had one or more references of depression. In some cases a student would only exhibit one post showing signs of depression, and others would create patterns of varying symptoms over the entire year.

Social Media Smashes Depression Stigma

Because of the nature of social media networks, not only were the statistics of students showing signs of depression measured, but so were the responses of their peers. One tremendous factor was that most often friends showed signs of support, not shame and neglect.

This brings up one of the most empowering and inspiring points of this research, which is that the shame and embarrassment once harbored by previous generations and the stigma for depression was not even present! Social media seems to have added a new element that allows for public disclosure to be received and accepted with support and a sense of community.

Follow-up studies by the same researchers found depression symptoms in various social media formats, including:

  • About 1/4 to 1/3 of young adults are displayed on their Facebook
  • 200,000 Tweets in 1 week using the terms ‘depression’ and ‘depressed
  • Self-harm communities sharing photos and offering support on Instagram

Sharing Suicidal Status

With the shattering of stigma by social media, there also comes a swift change in the culture of suicide. Now suicide notes are posted online, and not left to be discovered much too late. This has transformed the suicide note from an afterthought into a cry for help, creating some room for someone to reach out and impact that person’s decision.

There have even been reports of someone sharing something that caused others to act, which ultimately saved lives.

Not all posts are as direct and helpful as others, so sometimes there is not clarity to act upon. Then there is still some evidence to the issue that things like cyber-bullying on social media also make a contribution to depression and suicide.

Taking all factors into consideration, social media has definitely made a mark on the culture of depression and suicide. Some say it has only had an impact in the worst ways, but even though excessive and obsessive habits of using Facebook and social media can create an issue for those suffering from depression, could it also be possible that Facebook has made a vast difference when it comes to stigma and the way the depression is viewed on the public level by our society?

At the end of the day, doesn’t the actual post make the real difference? When you isolate, overshare and constantly compare yourself to the lives others choose to present to you than you are bound to get negative results. Facebook and social media does help the issue of suicide and depression by putting it all out there, removing the shame so common with stigma, and giving people who would normally keep their torment to themselves an avenue to explore for catharsis.

Addiction to drugs and alcohol is a terrible reality, and depression can go with or without that added affliction. Excessive use and dependence on social media can be its own addiction, and with depression it can magnify those feelings you’re struggling to cope with, but there is help. If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free 1-800-951-6135

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