Safe, effective drug/alcohol treatment

All across this country in small towns, rural areas and cities, alcoholism and drug abuse are destroying the lives of men, women and their families. Where to turn for help? What to do when friends, dignity and perhaps employment are lost?

The answer is Palm Partners Recovery Center. It’s a proven path to getting sober and staying sober.

Palm Partners’ innovative and consistently successful treatment includes: a focus on holistic health, a multi-disciplinary approach, a 12-step recovery program and customized aftercare. Depend on us for help with:

The Second Deadliest Drug in the United States is Cocaine

Author: Shernide Delva

The opioid addiction epidemic continues to increase in fatalities each and every year.  The use of opioids tripled between 2010 to 2014 and opioid overdoses occur every 19 minutes, according to the most recent surgeon general’s report. However, all the news about the opioid epidemic overshadowed the second deadliest drug in the United States. What is it, you ask?

Cocaine.

That’s right. The popularity of cocaine has not dwindled in the midst of the opioid epidemic. People are doing it, and doing lots of it. In fact, a recent CDC report revealed that heroin and cocaine are the drugs most frequently involved in overdose deaths in the US.

An analysis from U.S. News and World Report revealed that cocaine is the second most common drug involved in fatal overdoses.  Nevertheless, do not be fooled by these statistics. Opioids are much more deadly than cocaine and have a strong lead in comparison.

Breaking Down the Numbers: Heroin Leading Big Time

While heroin was responsible for 10,863 deaths in 2014 (23.1%), cocaine was responsible for 5,856 deaths (12.4%).  To gather the results, researchers looked at data from death certificates where medical examiners and coroners rule on the cause of death.

“The method was applied to provide a more in-depth understanding of the national picture of the drugs involved in drug overdose deaths,” the researchers wrote.

In addition to revealing the amounts of deaths, the data showed how the prevalence of heroin deaths have increased significantly, while cocaine deaths have remained for the most part stable. For example, in 2010, heroin caused 3,020 fatal overdoses. Only four years later, in 2014 that number tripled to 10,863 deaths. Yet, cocaine stayed relatively stable. In 2010, cocaine deaths were at 4,312 and rose to 5,856 deaths in 2014.

Other drugs that saw dramatic increases were antianxiety medications (4,212 deaths) and fentanyl (4,200 deaths). Although these numbers serve a valuable purpose, researchers do caution comparing numbers across years because increased reporting and detection can skew results.

Drug Interactions: A Deadly Combination

Another important part to note is that 49% of these overdose drugs involved more than one drug, according to 2014 data. Most of the time, overdose deaths involve more than one substance so the numbers could coincide with one another.

“For example, the majority of the drug overdose deaths [in 2014] involving methamphetamine did not involve other drugs,” the researchers wrote. “In contrast, among deaths involving alprazolam and diazepam, more than 95% involved other drugs.”

Overall, the number of overdose deaths increased by 23%, rising from 38,329 in 2010 to 47,055 in 2014. Although drugs other than opioids contributed to the rising overdose rates, the data confirm that opioids have a massive impact on overdose death rates.

“The most frequently mentioned drugs involved in these deaths were the opioids: heroin, oxycodone, methadone, morphine, hydrocodone, and fentanyl,” researchers wrote.

In addition to data about specific drugs, researchers called for more accurate data on overdose deaths to be kept. In the future, they would like a more detailed analysis on these increasing drug overdoses.

“The report also demonstrates the ability of a new method for abstracting data from the death certificate to enhance national monitoring of drug overdose deaths, and it emphasizes the need to include specific drugs involved in the death on the death certificate,” said the researchers.


Whether it is cocaine or opioids like heroin or oxycodone, the epidemic is resulting in massive fatalities. With the new year right around the corner, the time is now to make a change. Your past should not dictate your future. We are here to guide you in the right direction. If you are struggling with drugs or mental illness, do not wait. Call toll-free today.

   CALL NOW 1-800-951-6135

New Mental Health Movement Wants to Train Millions of Americans

New Mental Health Movement Wants to Train Millions of Americans

Author: Justin Mckibben

Mental health disorders, along with substance abuse and addiction, are increasingly ubiquitous among the population of the United States of America. Every day people are sick, suffering and dying due to untreated issues with mental health or drug use, and every day there are dedicated and compassionate individuals fighting to make a difference, but still too many are turning away from those who need help. Not because of cruelty, but because of stigma or lack of understanding the problem.

The National Council for Behavioral Health is hoping to break this cycle of misunderstanding, misinformation and untreated illness by changing the way mental health treatment works in America. The council has officially announced the launch of a new campaign, “Be 1 in a Million,” which was created in order to try and train 1 million people in Mental Health First Aid.

American Mental Health 

According to the National Council for Behavioral Health, one in four Americans will suffer from a mental illness or addiction every year. Recent studies have shown that more youth are becoming depressed.

  • There was a 1.2% increase in youth with depression
  • 3% increase in youth with severe depression between 2010 and 2013

Even more troubling then some of the most daunting statistics about the state of mental health in America is the deplorable rates at which people with serious disorders are going untreated. According to Mental Health America:

  • Nationally, 57% of adults with mental illness receive no treatment
  • In some states (Nevada and Hawaii), nearly 70% of adults with mental illness receive no treatment
  • 64% of youth with depression do not receive any treatment
  • Among youths with severe depression, 63% do not receive any outpatient services

Experts say that because of the lack of treatment, for those who struggle with a mental health disorder symptoms and impairment are likely to exacerbate over time, leading individuals to experience significant deterioration in quality of life.

New Mental Health Training Movement

The purpose of this new campaign for Mental Health First Aid training is to help fund scholarships for instructors who specialize in mental health and substance use, and provide grants to help instructors target more vulnerable US populations such as:

Thus far the National Council has already made a $1 million contribution to the campaign, which also received more than $15 million from Congress.

The crusade to combat mental health disorders has rallied the efforts of more than 500,000 people, including the First Lady Michelle Obama, trying to improve on the ways in which we identify someone who may be experiencing a mental health or substance abuse problem and how to encourage them to seek help.

To make a more pungent point on the prevalence of mental health issues Laira Roth, project manager for the National Council for Behavioral Health’s first aid course stated that compared to someone with a physical medical emergency,

“The truth of the matter is that you are more likely to encounter someone who is experiencing a behavioral health condition or crisis”

All over America various organizations have made a compassionate and resolute commitment to training people in Mental Health First Aid in the coming year. Bill DeBlasio, the Mayor of New York City, has pledged to train 250,000 New Yorkers for Mental Health First Aid, and the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention held more than 100 training sessions already this last year.

Making a Move for First Aid

The National Council for Behavioral Health is adamantly urging every American to get trained in Mental Health First Aid, seeing as how odds are in a nation so mixed with millions of people and cultures every single American citizen is more than likely to know someone with a mental health disorder. Linda Rosenberg, president and CEO of the National Council said,

“This training is relevant to all of us. When you complete the Mental Health First Aid training, you will know how to intervene with someone who is actively suicidal, or help someone who is having a panic attack. You will be able to support a veteran experiencing PTSD symptoms, or a college student with a serious eating disorder. You will be able to recognize a coworker who may be struggling with addiction or a friend who is feeling depressed.”

So the overall goal for this campaign this year is to inspire more people to be more actively involved and aware of how mental health and substance abuse issues impacts every life and community to some extent or another, and that as we shatter stigma and create compassion we should all be willing to make a difference.

For more information on how you could help a friend or family member in need, check out: www.mentalhealthfirstaid.org

Palm Partners understands the importance of mental health treatment when it comes to substance abuse, and dual diagnosis treatment is designed to acknowledge the overlapping nature of these disorders and create the right recovery plan to overcome the disease of addiction and confront issues with mental health. If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free 1-800-951-6135. We want to help, you are not alone.

 

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Drug Treatment

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Drug Treatment

Cognitive behavioral therapy in drug treatment is the most common type of therapy in drug rehab; it can be used in group therapy and individual therapy.Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), when used in drug treatment, is based on the idea that feelings and behaviors are caused by a person’s thoughts, not on outside circumstances and events.

People are not always able to change their circumstances but, CBT says, they can change their thoughts thus changing how they feel and behave. As for drug addicts, this therapeutic approach brings awareness the way they behaved and felt when using drugs and alcohol. With cognitive behavioral therapy in drug treatment, they can change these destructive behaviors and develop new, healthy ones.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Drug Treatment: What is CBT?

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) refers to behavior therapy, cognitive therapy, and therapy based upon a combination of basic behavioral and cognitive principles. It is a “structured, short-term, present-oriented psychotherapy for depression, directed toward solving current problems and modifying dysfunctional (inaccurate and/or unhelpful) thinking and behavior.”

CBT has been shown to be effective in treating a variety of conditions, including mood, personality, eating, substance abuse, and psychotic disorders. Evidence-based treatment, where specific treatments for symptom-based diagnoses are recommended, has favored CBT over other approaches such as psychodynamic treatments.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Drug Treatment: Mood Disorders

It’s quite common for people who struggle with substance use disorders, such as addiction, to also be suffering with mental illness, such as a mood disorder (i.e. depression, anxiety). Therefore, the most successful programs offer dual diagnosis treatment. Dual diagnosis treatment approaches treating the client for both of their conditions simultaneously for the best treatment outcomes.

Because CBT is useful in treating clients when it comes to addiction as well as those with mood disorder, cognitive behavioral therapy in drug treatment for those with a dual diagnosis is a valid, beneficial and therefore often-used approach.

Most therapists working with patients dealing with anxiety and depression use a blend of cognitive and behavioral therapy. This technique acknowledges that there may be behaviors that cannot be controlled through rational thought, but rather emerge based on prior conditioning from the environment and other external and/or internal stimuli.

Mainstream cognitive behavioral therapy assumes that changing maladaptive thinking leads to change in affect and behavior as well as emphasizes changes in the client’s relationship to maladaptive thinking rather than changes in thinking itself. Therapists use CBT techniques to help clients challenge their patterns and beliefs and replace what they call “errors in thinking such as overgeneralizing, magnifying negatives, minimizing positives and catastrophizing” with “more realistic and effective thoughts, thus decreasing emotional distress and self-defeating behavior.”

Modern Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Drug Treatment

Modern forms of CBT include a number of diverse but related techniques such as exposure therapy, stress inoculation training, cognitive processing therapy, cognitive therapy, relaxation training, dialectical behavior therapy, and acceptance and commitment therapy. Some practitioners promote a form of mindful cognitive therapy which includes a greater emphasis on self-awareness as part of the therapeutic process.

Cognitive behavioral therapy in drug treatment has six phases:

  • Assessment or psychological assessment;
  • Reconceptualization;
  • Skills acquisition;
  • Skills consolidation and application training;
  • Generalization and maintenance;
  • Post-treatment assessment follow-up.

CBT is “problem focused,” meaning that it is used to address specific problems as well as “action oriented” – the CBT therapist assists the client in creating specific strategies in order to address the identified problems.

If you are struggling with a psychological disorder and/or substance use disorder, CBT and dual diagnosis treatment can get you on the path to health and recovery. At Palm Partners, we employ CBT methods as well as several other approaches to treatment, including holistic methods, in order to help our clients reach successful outcomes of their cognitive behavioral therapy in drug treatment program. Please call toll-free 1-800-951-6135 to speak with one of our knowledgeable and compassionate Addiction Specialists; we are available 24/7.

Outpatient Treatment in South Florida

Outpatient Treatment in South Florida

Author: Justin Mckibben

Drug addiction and alcoholism are both devastating afflictions, and when someone had gotten to the point where they have acknowledged the severity of their situation, they will want to know what kind of help is available to them. Drug addiction and alcoholism impact not just the individual, but also friends, relatives, and partners, and can have a catastrophic impact on people’s lives. Outpatient treatment in south Florida is just one of many options out there to help someone make the change that could save their life.

Sometimes addicts and alcoholics continue to drink or use drugs even in the face of severe consequences, and often they are in a very dark place when they finally decide they need help. Outpatient treatment in south Florida can be the best starting place for recovery from a serious state of addiction.

Outpatient Treatment in South Florida: The First Steps

The first steps to locating outpatient treatment in south Florida can seem intimidating, but in reality they are simple enough. You should take the time to assess your personal treatment needs, because if someone is physically dependent on drugs or alcohol, it is often recommended that they complete a detox program before attending outpatient alcohol treatment.

Detoxing can be very uncomfortable. Alcohol and some drugs can be so dangerous to detox from on your own at home, and some withdrawals can lead to seizures and even death. Not to mention, a medical detox is a safer environment for any adverse health effects.

Too many people relapse during the detox phase and don’t make it any further than that in recovery when they try to do it themselves, and that can be simply because of the physical discomfort and the fear of feeling that discomfort. Before outpatient treatment in south Florida a medical detox ensures a safe, comfortable process.

Outpatient treatment in south Florida makes sure during the detox phase that individuals are provided medication to relieve the discomfort of withdrawal, and the patient is monitored throughout the course of the treatment. Usually, the outpatient treatment in south Florida you choose will either have an on-site detox or will be able to direct you to a quality detox facility.

Outpatient Treatment in South Florida: Why is Inpatient Important?

In most cases before attending a program for outpatient treatment in south Florida it is recommended that you complete an inpatient treatment program, which are also very available in south Florida. This is a facility where you have an opportunity to experience various forms of therapy all day. The therapy sessions are designed to teach you the skills to live a sober, drug-free life.

Outpatient treatment in south Florida is a good follow up to inpatient treatment because it keeps you accountable and helps you deal with things that come up once you are living on your own. Most treatment programs in south Florida will offer both inpatient and intensive outpatient (IOP) level treatment. The most dangerous time for a lot of people is right after they leave inpatient treatment, which is what makes IOP at outpatient treatment in south Florida such an important part.

The risk for relapse is very high for those who never have a level of IOP care. Inpatient treatment gives an individual a chance of learning effective ways to live outside of rehab, and then outpatient treatment in south Florida can also drastically improve the chances of staying sober.

Outpatient Treatment in South Florida: Can I only do Outpatient?

Some people cannot attend inpatient alcohol treatment. IOP may be their only option because they cannot take 30 to 90 days out of their schedule to attend a residential treatment program. Sometimes it’s that they are the only parent available to take care of their children, or sometimes they have a career they cannot take time off from. Outpatient treatment in south Florida can be a good solution for those that are unable to go to inpatient treatment.

Outpatient treatment in Florida usually requires that a person come in for treatment 3 to 5 days a week, depending on their IOP program. Individuals seeking treatment will typically attend both group therapy and individual therapy sessions much like an inpatient treatment center, but the person will go home at the end of the day instead of living at the residential facility.

It is important when locating an outpatient alcohol treatment to do the homework on the IOP programs in south Florida you are considering. If you have a co-occurring disease, such as:

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Eating disorder

You should make sure that the program you are going to attending for outpatient treatment in south Florida has experience dealing with dual diagnosis. Also be sure to research the credentials of the outpatient alcohol treatment in south Florida to make sure they are certified in addiction treatment.

Outpatient treatment in south Florida is a great start to an amazing future for those who are willing to go the distance and take the necessary steps in order to further their happiness and enrich their future. Recovery does not end with outpatient treatment in south Florida, but it can be as great a place to get started as any. While inpatient should never be taken completely off the table, you do have options.

Treatment for drug and alcohol abuse and addiction comes in many forms and with different levels of care. Palm Partners is dedicated to helping individuals develop a recovery plan that is right for you, and helping you reach every goal you set for your outpatient treatment in south Florida. If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free 1-800-951-6135

Mental Health Addiction Treatment in Florida

Mental Health Addiction Treatment in Florida

Mental health addiction treatment in Florida is often referred to as the Recovery Capital (and also the Rehab Capital) of the world. There is such a large recovery community, coupled with a more notable diversity of mental health addiction treatment in Florida. Much of this has to do with the climate and the culture of the area. In other words the atmosphere and surroundings of the gorgeous southern shores and beautiful residential areas are ideal for the process of a mental health addiction treatment in Florida.

Mental Health Addiction Treatment in Florida: Dual Diagnosis

Often times mental health disorders and substance abuse occur simultaneously. Because these are both recognized as medical conditions by the medical community, there is specialized treatment available that treats these coexisting disorders. This form treatment is often called ‘dual diagnosis’ treatment, and it’s included as a large portion of most programs and therapeutic methods of mental health addiction treatment in Florida.

Mental Health Addiction Treatment in Florida: Addiction and Mental Health Assessment

When you enroll into a facility for mental health addiction treatment in Florida, you will sit down with an intake specialist who will ask you some questions about both your mental health history as well as your substance abuse history. You will also be given a drug test to see what substances are in your system at the time of your admission. All of this information, both what you report and the results of your drug screen is protected by HIPAA, a federal law that protects your medical information by ensuring confidentiality.

A team of specialists including:

  • Psychiatrist
  • Therapist
  • Medical doctor
  • Nurses
  • Case worker

Are assigned and all work together to design a treatment plan specifically for you, with the information gathered during your evaluation. This will help to determine the course of treatment, such as medications and therapy methods that will go into your care while you’re at the facility for mental health addiction treatment in Florida.

Mental Health Addiction Treatment in Florida: Medical Detox

A monitored and medical detox takes place over the first couple of days to a week. During this brief period you will meet with each of your care specialists, including the psychiatrist and physician, to be sure you will be prescribed properly and given any medications that are determined necessary in the course of your care.

Mental Health Addiction Treatment in Florida: Inpatient Rehabilitation

Inpatient rehabilitation takes place over a a period that is typically between 30-90 days, depending what you and your team of clinical care professionals establish to be necessary, and is a time where you will begin to feel better both physically, mentally, and emotionally. The substances you were abusing will be leaving the bodies system while the therapeutic medications such as anti-depressants or anti-anxiety prescriptions can begin to help you transition, without the interaction of the other drugs you had been using.

Also during this time, you will begin to reap the benefits of both individual and group therapy sessions, where you will learn important information regarding the disease of addiction and how addiction and mental illness often coincide. As well, you will learn vital, life-saving tools that important to the recovery process.

Mental Health Addiction Treatment in Florida: Intensive Outpatient Program

An intensive outpatient program (IOP) usually follows the inpatient rehab stage of mental health addiction treatment in Florida. Attending an IOP is a level of care in-between that is not quite as intensive as the inpatient phase of treatment yet it offers some structure as well as continued work with a therapist and in peer groups. The point of an IOP is to continue to offer some support while you begin to reestablish yourself into a life outside treatment: getting or returning to your job, rejoining your family, attending family matters, etc.

Mental Health Addiction Treatment in Florida: After Care

While attending the outpatient program you will continue to work with a case worker as well as your therapist and psychiatrist. All of these individuals will assist with creating an aftercare plan that is tailor-made according to your needs and circumstances. Because it is dual diagnosis mental health addiction treatment in Florida, having a program of continued care is not only a good idea; it’s also a requirement – by law – that ensures you will be set up with certain medical specialists so as to continue with both your therapeutic treatment as well as with your prescribed medications.

Struggling with your mental health and your addiction all at once can seem far to overwhelming to ensure lasting recovery, but Palm Partners is a capable and accredited dual diagnosis treatment program right in the heart of Palm Beach County that serves people both locally and from all parts of the country as one of the greatest locations for mental health addiction treatment in Florida. If you or someone you love is struggling with mental health and substance abuse, please call today toll-free 1-800-951-6135

free treatment ebook

Categories

Accepted Insurance Types Please call to inquire
Call Now