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All across this country in small towns, rural areas and cities, alcoholism and drug abuse are destroying the lives of men, women and their families. Where to turn for help? What to do when friends, dignity and perhaps employment are lost?

The answer is Palm Partners Recovery Center. It’s a proven path to getting sober and staying sober.

Palm Partners’ innovative and consistently successful treatment includes: a focus on holistic health, a multi-disciplinary approach, a 12-step recovery program and customized aftercare. Depend on us for help with:

LGBT Community at High Risk of Eating Disorders

LGBT Community at High Risk of Eating Disorders

Author: Justin Mckibben

The lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community is not without its own history of facing conflict and adversity, as the civil rights of these individuals are often debated and questioned, and certain people in the LGBT community have been speculated to have a unique susceptibility to specific health risks. Lesbian women have been said to be more vulnerable to breast cancer, while gay men are suggested to have an increased risk of HIV or other infections.

With the various notions of threats to these individuals health, it may not be too much of a shock that there is some conjecture of another serious health risk for the LGBT community, as recent research proposes these individuals may be at a higher risk of developing an eating disorder than straight and cisgender individuals, with transgender people at the highest risk.

Talking Transgender

Just to clarify some general information:

Cisgender (cissexual) – Related types of gender identity where individuals’ experiences of their own gender match the sex they were assigned at birth

TransgenderWhen gender identity or gender expression does not match one’s assigned sex. Transgender is independent of sexual orientation; transgender people may identify as:

  • Heterosexual
  • Homosexual
  • Bisexual
  • Asexual, etc.

This relates to a report published on April 28th in the Journal of Adolescent Health with data drawn from the first study examining eating disordered behavior among a significant proportion of transgender people compared to cisgender people, with numbers making it sufficient enough to make a meaningful comparison.

Researchers surveyed students from 223 universities across the United States between 2008 and 2011, inquiring about several aspects including:

  • Mental health
  • Substance use
  • Sexual behavior
  • Nutrition history

Out of those included in the study:

  • 200,000 were heterosexuals
  • 5,000 were “unsure” of sexual orientation
  • 15,000 were gay/lesbian/bisexual
  • 479 were transgender

The survey found that cisgender heterosexual men were at the lowest risk of eating disorders, while transgender people were at the highest risk out of those surveyed. This again does not prove to be rule of thumb, but is the idea presented by the research.

Reading Results

According to the study’s lead author, Alexis E. Duncan from Washington University in St. Louis, that in broad terms they determined cisgender heterosexual men had the lowest rates of eating disorders, while cisgender heterosexual women found themselves in the middle, and transgender individuals were found to have the highest risk.

  • Approximately 1.5% of the students reported being diagnosed with an eating disorder during the previous year
  • Nearly 3% had self-induced vomited or used laxatives to control weight
  • More than 3% had used diet pills in the previous month

Out of these overall averages transgender individuals had the highest rates, so from reading these results it seems to support the concept that these issues are more commonly combatted in the LGBT community.

Shifting Stigma

Now this new research may actually provide a shift in stigma that has labeled eating disorders as a ‘women’s issue.’ Past studies of eating disordered behaviors have been generally focused on heterosexual women, who are considered the most at risk, to the extent that so many assume the stigma of disordered eating being a ‘female issue’ and ignoring the growing number of males who suffer from eating disorders as well.

This study could raise a red flag that creates a change, because it revealed that transgender students were actually more than 4 times as likely as cisgender heterosexual women to report an eating disorder diagnosis. Transgender students were also 2 times as likely as cisgender females to have used unsafe methods to control their weight such as:

  • Diet pills
  • Self-induced vomiting
  • Laxatives

These are only part of the data collected that suggests the outdated ideas behind eating disorders being a gender-specific issue are not as founded in facts as many may believe, and more can always be revealed.

Counting Conclusions

Monica Algars of Abo Akademi University in Turku, Finland once conducted a study on eating disorders that determined there is a connection between eating disorders, gender dysphoria and body dissatisfaction among transgender people, which means to infer that transgender people may adopt unhealthy and harmful eating habits to manipulate their bodies to try and fit the gender the identify with, or revolt against one they do not.

Algars explains that these attempts to suppress features of their birth gender may manifest as a desire to control weight, and the added stress created by stigma and discrimination may also contribute to the problem. But all this has the possibility of being alleviated by gender reassignment therapy.

Out of all the conclusions one can come to, one definitively counts: stigma is hurting people, and even killing people who never get the help they need. Be it someone from the LGBT community or a cisgender heterosexual individual, stigma puts us all at a greater risk. It can fuel body dissatisfaction, eating disorders, and even substance abuse. And once someone has fallen prey to these conditions, they can be trapped in a never ending cycle of abuse, stigma and self-mutilation in the form of obsession and deprivation.

Regardless of someone’s sexual orientation, they deserve the same life of love and freedom from stigma as the rest of us. It is up to all of us to make recovery and unity a reality.

Eating disorders and substance abuse are tormenting and fatal symptoms of the disease of addiction, but recovery from that hopelessness is possible for everyone who seeks it. If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free 1-800-951-6135

LGBT Drug Rehab

LGBT Drug Rehab

Author: Justin Mckibben

LGBT is more than just a few upper-case letters to a lot of people. LGBT typically signifies the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender community in terms of treatment, and LGBT drug rehab is designed to provide a safe environment for anyone and everyone who is actively seeking treatment for their issues with substance abuse or addiction, and in a LGBT Drug Rehab (LGBQT Drug Rehab) there is an atmosphere for equal and understanding support systems to be set up. LGBT drug rehab facilities and their staff do not judge individuals based on any aspect of their personal lives. Your race, sex, age, sexual orientation, nationality, ethnicity, economic situation, past, etc. is never used as a basis for discrimination, and a LGBT Drug Rehab will do everything to make your experience comfortable. LGBT or LGBQT Drug Rehab facilities are here to help you beat your addiction and help you feel great about yourself during this transition.

If and when you do come to Palm Partners we know that you are an individual and you may have special needs or request in order to further enhance your recovery.

If you consider yourself to be a part of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgendered (LGBT) or Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Queer and Transgender (LGBQT) community, please be aware that LGBT drug rehab and LGBQT drug rehab facilities offer services to address your needs. LGBT drug rehab programs and LGBQT drug rehab centers are aware of the issues that affect the LGBT community differently, as well as issues that are unique to the LGBT or LGBQT drug rehab community, and LGBT drug rehab can provide you with therapy and services that address those specific needs with an experienced and compassionate staff.

LGBT Drug Rehab: Addiction in the LGBT Community

Recent studies have indicated that approximately between 20% and 30% of gay and transgender people abuse substances, compared to about 9% of the general population. According to statistics in the United States there are three main factors leading to these rates of substance use and abuse among gay and transgender people in the country. These three contributing elements are:

  • High level of stress that comes from social prejudice and discriminatory laws in areas of daily life such as employment, relationship recognition, and health care.
  • Lack of cultural competency in the health care system discourages gay and transgender people from seeking treatment for substance abuse, and—if they do seek help—often leads to inappropriate or irrelevant services.
  • Targeted marketing efforts by alcohol and tobacco companies exploit the connection many gay and transgender people have to bars and clubs as safe spaces for socializing and increase easy access to tobacco products and alcohol.

LGBT drug rehab and LGBQT drug rehab programs embrace the LGBT community, and support these individuals with LGBT friendly recovery criteria. They provide groups unique to LGBT individuals in recovery, as well as specialized therapist on staff who work specifically in LGBT therapy. There is a great deal of effort put forth in the best LGBT drug rehab programs to create connections between clients and the local LGBT community, in order to provide them with resources that can help them after they leave LGBT drug rehab.

LGBT Drug Rehab: Addressing All Aspects of Addiction

The best LGBT drug rehab will offer therapy that includes a variety of treatment methods pertaining to all different facets and aspects of addiction. Some of these are more relevant for lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and transgender individuals who need help with substance abuse. Some of the things LGBT drug rehab and LGBQT drug rehab centers address are:

  • AIDS/HIV positive issues
  • Sexuality issues
  • Relationship issues for the addict and the co-addict
  • Incest/child abuse
  • Sexual identity and crossover issues
  • Crisis intervention
  • Medication management
  • Alcohol and drug dependency
  • Adult children of alcoholics
  • Eating disorders and food addictions
  • Couples conflict and intimacy issues

Not all drug treatment centers are created equal, but all people are!  Not all drug rehabs have programs that are LGBT friendly, but those who do are powerful tools in recovery for anyone who is part of that community.

LGBT Drug Rehab: Palm Partners Treatment Program

There are many things that Palm Partners does that make the Palm Partners treatment program unique with the LGBT community are:

  • Helping lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and transgender persons: help with coming out
  • Internal and external homophobia
  • Socialization and sobriety skills
  • Sexual compulsivity
  • Sex addiction

The therapy for those that are in LGBT drug rehab and LGBQT drug rehab also includes therapy for trauma

  • Incest/child abuse and rape
  • Codependency
  • Couples conflict resolution.

As part of the LGBT therapy Palm Partners also offers HIV/AIDS education and awareness groups and classes, as well as groups to deal with grief and loss. There is also education and counseling for the families of those who are lesbian, gay men, bisexual or transgender to acknowledge that substance abuse, addiction, and recovery are a process that affects the whole family.

LGBT and LGBQT friendly drug rehab programs may not seem like the easiest thing to find, but there are incredible programs available that are fully supportive and proactive when it comes to treating LGBT/LGBQT clients with the respect and compassion that we all deserve, while giving them the constructive and empowering tools for their recovery, and for their future. If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse or addiction, please call toll-free 1-800-951-6135. We want to help. You are not alone.

Why the Expansion of the Family and Medical Leave Act is Good News for People Struggling with Addiction

Why the Expansion of the Family and Medical Leave Act is Good News for People Struggling with Addiction

I am a person in recovery and was able to go to into a substance abuse treatment facility thanks to my job at the time. I had medical benefits through my employer, which means that I also was covered by something called the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA). That piece of legislation allowed me to go to inpatient rehab for my substance abuse and addiction issues without penalty, meaning that I had job security: I couldn’t be fired for getting help.

In fact, I had 3 months of paid leave while I went into a program to save my life. It was a relief knowing that I had the law on my side when I finally decided to face my problem.

I learned a lot about the FMLA through my personal experiences of using it to my benefit. Now, as someone who advocates on behalf of others who are in the same position I was once in – seeking treatment but fearing retribution from their employer, such as dismissal, I found out that the FMLA also covers family members who are taking care of a loved one who is seeking treatment. That is, the FMLA doesn’t just cover the person seeking help but, also any of their family members who may be caring for them or their affairs – such as a grandparent taking care of the patient’s children – while they are in treatment.

This is such an awesome thing. However, for people who identify as gay or lesbian, there wasn’t a guarantee of that extended coverage. Just like with other rights and, especially when it came to medical benefits, same-sex partners were often not recognized as family members. This is the heart of the argument for pro-marriage equality laws. More and more states are adopting laws protecting marriage equality, changing the way things work in a profound way. Namely, who we consider to be “family members” and how they should be covered when it comes to certain benefits.

And now, more groundbreaking changes are taking place – with the FMLA, specifically.

The Labor Department issued a proposed rule Friday stating that any employee is eligible for leave to care for a same-sex spouse under the Family and Medical Leave Act regardless of whether they live in a state that recognizes their marital status.

Since last year’s Supreme Court decision striking down the 1996 Defense of Marriage Act, the proposed rule is the latest effort by the Obama administration to extend federal benefits to same-sex couples. The ruling in the case Windsor v. the United States, found that gay couples that were married in states where it’s legal are entitled to receive the same federal health, tax, Social Security and other benefits that heterosexual couples receive.

In almost all instances, same-sex married couples will receive the same federal benefits and obligations as their heterosexual counterparts, regardless of where they live.

Human Rights Campaign spokesman Fred Sainz called the administration’s application of the Windsor decision to federal policy is “easily the largest conferral of rights, benefits and obligations to gay and lesbian Americans in our nation’s history.”

There are two exceptions remaining, which are regarding Social Security and Veterans’ benefits. Currently, these are determined based on the law where individuals live, as opposed to where their marriage took place. The Human Rights Campaign, the American Civil Liberties Union, as well as several other gay and civil rights groups have been pressing lawmakers to extend those federal benefits to same-sex couples.

Labor Secretary Thomas E. Perez said, “The basic promise of the FMLA is that no one should have to choose between succeeding at work and being a loving family caregiver. Under the proposed revisions, the FMLA will be applied to all families equally, enabling individuals in same-sex marriages to fully exercise their rights and fulfill their responsibilities to their families.”

If you or someone you love is struggling with substance abuse and addiction, please call toll-free 1-800-951-6135.

Is Palm Partners LGBT Friendly?

Is Palm Partners LGBT Friendly

Is Palm Partners LGBT Friendly?

At Palm Partners our doors and hearts are open to everyone. We provide a safe environment for anyone who is willing to seek treatment for their addiction. We do not judge you on your past, race, sex, age, sexual orientation, nationality, ethnicity, economic situation, etc. Neither we, nor anyone else can judge you. We are here to help you beat your addiction and help you feel great about yourself; that is all.

If and when you do come to Palm Partners we know that you are an individual and you may have special needs or request in order to further enhance your recovery.

If you consider yourself to be a part of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgendered community please be aware that we offer services here to address your needs. We know that the issues that affect you are unique in themselves and we can provide you with therapy and services that address those specific issues.

Did you know that about, “20 percent to 30 percent of gay and transgender people abuse substances, compared to about 9 percent of the general population”?

According to American Progress the three main factors leading to these rates of substance use and abuse among gay and transgender people are due to:

  • High level of stress that comes from social prejudice and discriminatory laws in areas of daily life such as employment, relationship recognition, and health care.
  • Lack of cultural competency in the health care system discourages gay and transgender people from seeking treatment for substance abuse, and—if they do seek help—often leads to inappropriate or irrelevant services.
  • Targeted marketing efforts by alcohol and tobacco companies exploit the connection many gay and transgender people have to bars and clubs as safe spaces for socializing and increase easy access to tobacco products and alcohol.

At Palm Partners we openly embrace the LGBT community and are a LGBT friendly drug rehab. Palm Partners offers unique LGBT groups and also has a therapist on staff that specializes in LGBT therapy. We connect clients with the local LGBT community and provide them with resources that can help them after they’ve left us.

The LGBT therapy includes multiple different facets of addiction for lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and transgender persons. Some of the things Palm Partners helps with are:

  • AIDS/HIV positive issues
  • Sexuality issues
  • Relationship issues for the addict and the co-addict
  • Incest/child abuse
  • Sexual identity and crossover issues
  • Crisis intervention
  • Medication management
  • Alcohol and drug dependency
  • Adult children of alcoholics
  • Eating disorders and food addictions
  • Couples conflict and intimacy issues

Not all drug treatment centers are created equal and not all of them have programs that are LGBT friendly. Here are some other things that Palm Partners does that make them unique with the LGBT community.

In helping lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and transgender persons; Palm Partners can help with coming out, internal and external homophobia, socialization and sobriety skills. Not just that but Palm Partners can also help sexual compulsivity and addiction to sex. The therapy for those that are LGBT also includes therapy for trauma, incest/child abuse and rape, codependency, and couples conflict resolution.

As part of the LGBT therapy Palm Partners also offers HIV/AIDS groups and classes as well as groups to deal with grief and loss. There is also education and counseling for the families of those who are lesbian, gay men, bisexual or transgender.

If your loved one is in need of addiction treatment, please give us a call at 800-951-6135.

Sources:

http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/lgbt/report/2012/03/09/11228/why-the-gay-and-transgender-population-experiences-higher-rates-of-substance-use/

 

 

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